Wednesday, March 8, 2017

  • News Wrap: ISIS claims responsibility for Afghan attack
    In our news wrap Wednesday, heavily armed gunmen who were disguised in white lab coats stormed a military hospital in Kabul. At least 30 people were killed. Also, the U.S. military accused Russia of deploying a land-based cruise missile that violates a nuclear arms treaty.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
  • How will GOP tax credits compare with insurance premiums?
    Under the new Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, tax credits would assist uninsured people to buy coverage. But the criteria that determine eligibility is shifting, with age becoming a greater factor than income. Judy Woodruff talks to Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News about the impact if the plan becomes law.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
  • How scientists are tracking a massive iceberg in the making
    Antarctica's Larsen Ice Shelf is disappearing section by section. A fast-growing rift, one of the largest ever seen, is now teetering on the edge of breaking away from the glacier. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien explores how scientists have tracked the steady loss of ice.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
  • Panetta: WikiLeaks dump of CIA info 'seriously damaging'
    A day after WikiLeaks published documents on the CIA's tools for hacking into personal electronics, Reuters reported that intelligence officials are focused on contractors as the likeliest source of the leak. How is the CIA likely responding to the revelations? Former CIA Director Leon Panetta joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the consequences for counterterrorism efforts and more.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
  • Finding Emily Dickinson in the power of her poetry
    Who was Emily Dickinson? A new exhibition at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York takes a closer look at the iconic American cultural figure through her poems and the remnants of her life, and finds a less reclusive woman than we thought we knew. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 8, 2017
    Wednesday on the NewsHour, we take a deep dive into the fight to replace the Affordable Care Act and consider what the Republicans' health care plan could mean for millions. Also: Former CIA Director Leon Panetta discusses the WikiLeaks hack, women show their economic strength by striking, the threat of a growing ice rift in the Antarctic and our enduring fascination with Emily Dickinson.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 8, 2017

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 7, 2017
    Tuesday on the NewsHour, Republicans roll out a new health care plan to upend the Affordable Care Act. Also: A GOP senator weighs in on the ongoing Russia investigation, WikiLeaks documents show CIA hacking efforts, the military's model pre-K program, a fictional TV series about Russian spies intersects with reality and a French artist lives in a giant rock for a week.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 7, 2017
  • Lankford: Trump tax records not relevant to Russia probe
    The first public hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was announced by the House Intelligence Committee, while Senate Democrats have called for a special counsel. Republican Sen. James Lankford, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, says a lot of the work will remain behind closed doors. He speaks with Judy Woodruff about the Senate’s probes and more.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • Quality child care gives military families peace of mind
    Child care for U.S. military families is among the best in the country and is significantly less expensive than the average civilian care. Special correspondent Kavitha Cardoza of Education Week traveled to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina to see how the military invested in quality care that builds brains and emotional security.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • News Wrap: DOJ nominee questioned over Russia investigation
    In our news wrap Tuesday, Rod Rosenstein, nominee for the number two position at the Justice Department, faced questioning at his confirmation hearing over investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Rosenstein would oversee the probe if he's confirmed. Also, claims of bombs and even a sniper were called in to Jewish community centers and the Anti-Defamation League in several cities.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • How would the American Health Care Act affect cost, access?
    The House bill that Republicans plan to pass to replace the Affordable Care Act keeps some of the most popular provisions of the law, but it does not mandate coverage and shifts how the government would provide financial help. John Yang looks at key aspects of the plan with Sabrina Corlette of the Health Policy Institute and Lanhee Chen of the Hoover Institution.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • 'The Americans' sees a perfect moment to humanize espionage
    As investigations examine Russia’s role in last year’s election, the highly acclaimed television series “The Americans” has been delivering an intimate, fictional look at the old Cold War and the lives of two Russian spies working undercover in the U.S. William Brangham reports.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • Resistance to GOP health care bill comes from both sides
    On day one of the push to sell a long-awaited replacement for the Affordable Care Act, Republican leaders mounted an all-out offensive with help from both the president and vice president. Dubbed the American Health Care Act, the plan changes aspects of its predecessor, including contentious matters of Medicaid and tax credits. Lisa Desjardins reports from Capitol Hill.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • What it’s like to curl up inside a rock for a week
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, performance artist Abraham Poincheval knows what it's like to be stuck between a rock and a hard place: For an entire week, he lived inside a boulder at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • WikiLeaks publishes purported CIA cyber tools
    WikiLeaks published thousands of pages on Tuesday of what it says are files about the CIA and its hacking activities. The material comes reportedly from the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence and includes a range of documents which describe cyber tools for hacking cellphones, computers, television and even vehicles. Jeffrey Brown speaks Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times about the revelations.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017

Monday, March 6, 2017

  • News Wrap: High court won’t hear transgender bathroom case
    In our news wrap Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court won't hear a case on transgender bathroom use in public schools. The court's action sends the case back to the lower case for further review. Also, North Korea successfully test-launched four more missiles. Three landed in Japanese waters, and drew condemnation from Japan and South Korea.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
    The U.S. Supreme Court building is pictured in Washington, D.C. Photo by REUTERS/Carlos Barria.
  • What's behind Trump's charge that Obama ordered wiretap?
    President Trump sparked a firestorm with a tweet over the weekend, accusing his predecessor -- without offering evidence -- of wiretapping Trump Tower ahead of the election and asking Congress to investigate. John Yang speaks with Rep. Adam Schiff, ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, and former Department of Homeland Security official Stewart Baker.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • Trump administration’s new travel ban makes critical changes
    The Trump administration targets a group of mostly Muslim nations in its second try at a travel ban by executive order. But it makes critical changes in hope of avoiding the issues that led courts to block it. The new order removes Iraq from the list of barred countries, limits the ban on Syrian refugees to 120 days and drops explicit exceptions for religious minorities. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • How the Obamacare replacement will test Republicans
    Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR join John Yang to discuss the origin of and fallout from President Trump’s recent wiretap accusations, as well as how Republican lawmakers and President Trump will have to work to pass a replacement for the Affordable Care Act.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • 'Get Out' dials up the scary side of race in America
    A trip to meet the parents in well-heeled, white suburban America -- what could go wrong? The new horror film "Get Out" is about the very real horror of racism. Jeffrey Brown sits down with director Jordan Peele to discuss his debut film that’s become a breakout hit.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • Is Trump’s revised travel ban constitutional?
    President Trump signed a new executive order that restricts travel from six Muslim majority countries after a first attempt was shot down by the courts. Will the new order pass legal muster? Jeffrey Brown gets debate from Neal Katyal, a former acting solicitor general under President Obama, and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, about whether it will hold up in court.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • Students devise science experiment that will really take off
    Students from 21 schools across the U.S. and Canada competed for the chance to have their science experiments sent to the International Space Station. One of the student teams selected, from East High School in Rochester, New York, designed an experiment on the process of photosynthesis. Special correspondent Sasha-Ann Simons from PBS station WXXI reports.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • How Republicans are planning to replace the ACA
    Republican lawmakers released their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Monday evening. Proposed changes include ending direct government subsidies in favor of tax credits, ending penalties of the individual mandate and phasing out the expansion of Medicaid in 2020. Lisa Desjardins talks with John Yang from Capitol Hill.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 6, 2017
    Monday on the NewsHour, the Trump administration unveils a revised travel ban after the first was blocked by the courts. Also: Making sense of President Trump's accusation that President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower, GOP lawmakers lay out a plan to replace Obamacare, a horror film about race in America and students compete to send science experiments to space.
    Original Air Date: March 6, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 6, 2017

Sunday, March 5, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 5, 2017
    On this edition for Sunday, March 5, the fallout continues after President Donald Trump claimed without providing evidence that former President Barack Obama had wiretapped Trump Tower during the presidential campaign. Later, the cost of water that was contaminated with lead in Flint, Michigan will rise when the state ends a subsidy program. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 5, 2017
  • Washington reacts to Trump’s claims of secret surveillance
    On this edition for Sunday, March 5, the fallout continues after President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that he was a victim of wiretapping during his campaign. Later, a new national park honors the life and legacy of leading abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 5, 2017
  • Flint water cost to rise as state ends subsidy
    In Flint, Michigan, residents still must use a filter to drink tap water, but the cost of that water will soon increase. The state is ending a subsidy program that reduced customers’ water bills after Flint's water was contaminated with lead in 2014. Michigan Radio reporter Steve Carmody joins Hari Sreenivasan from Flint to discuss.
    Original Air Date: March 5, 2017
  • New national park celebrates Harriet Tubman's legacy
    After Harriet Tubman, famed conductor of the Underground Railroad, rescued dozens of people from slavery and served in the Civil War, she settled down in the small city of Auburn in upstate New York and continued a life of service. The National Park Service recently made her property a national park, celebrating the later chapters of her life. NewsHour Weekend's Megan Thompson reports.
    Original Air Date: March 5, 2017

VIDEO SEARCH