Tuesday, September 13, 2016

  • The U.S. just got a big pay raise. Why don’t we feel it?
    It’s a major issue on the campaign trail: American angst about jobs and wages. New census data from last year shows that for the first time in almost a decade, household incomes in the U.S. have gone up and the poverty rate has gone down. Lisa Desjardins takes a look at those numbers and at why many Americans feel like they are inconsistent with their experiences.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
    Construction workers work the construction of a new building partly covered with a large US flag on September 25, 2013 in Los Angeles, California, where the state's Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation  that will raise the California minimum wage from $8 to $10 per hour by 2016. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Debunking Donald Trump’s claims about charity
    Hillary Clinton has been scrutinized for questions about the Clinton Foundation. Now Donald Trump is catching heat for how his own foundation operates. Judy Woodruff speaks with The Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold, who has spent the past few months researching Trump’s charitable donations and seeming lack of personal contributions to his own cause.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Asheville, North Carolina, U.S., September 12, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Segar - RTSNG36
  • Is this farm helping migrants or just a field of schemes?
    It seemed like a rare positive story about the migrant crisis: African refugees, relocated to Sardinia from their war-torn countries, providing for themselves by farming. But when the NewsHour arrived at the farm, no workers were there. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant’s ensuing investigation was winding and, at times, hostile. Were there ever any farmers, or was something else going on?
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
    Field in Sardinia, Italy, purported to be a field farmed by migrants. Image by Malcolm Brabant
  • How the sugar industry paid experts to downplay health risks
    Researchers have discovered documents showing that the sugar industry paid researchers to downplay the health risks of sugar and play up the risks of saturated fat in the 1960s. Gwen Ifill speaks with Marion Nestle of New York University about the revelations, the health impacts of consuming sugar and the complexities of studying nutrition.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
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  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 13, 2016
    Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. incomes rise for the first time in almost a decade as poverty rates drop. Also: Questions arise around Donald Trump’s charity, an Italian farm in Italy that’s run by immigrants is missing a key ingredient, how the sugar industry influenced research on heart disease, rethinking college to include more Latino men and the latest tale from writer Ann Patchett.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
    United States one dollar bills are seen on a light table at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington November 14, 2014. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File Photo                  GLOBAL BUSINESS WEEK AHEAD PACKAGE Ð SEARCH ÒBUSINESS WEEK AHEAD SEPTEMBER 12Ó FOR ALL IMAGES - RTSNAGH
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 13, 2016
  • A mentoring program that aims to keep Latino males in school
    On college campuses, Latino males are perhaps the most underrepresented group. These men are often expected to provide for their families, which can mean a choice between getting an education and getting a job. Hari Sreenivasan reports as part of our Rethinking College series on one program that’s trying to combat the issue by creating mentorship opportunities.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
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  • Ann Patchett on how independent bookstores build community
    If you shop at the East Nashville Farmers’ Market you can buy fruits and vegetables; but you can also meet a famous author with a stop by the traveling bookmobile. Ann Patchett is a co-owner of the Parnassus Books, founded at a time when bookstores were disappearing. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Patchett about her latest novel, “Commonwealth,” a story that she says hits close to home.
    Original Air Date: September 13, 2016
    NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 8: Author Ann Patchett sits for a portrait at The Wales Hotel in New York, New York on November 8th, 2013. Patchett is currently on tour promoting her new book This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, which is a collection of non-fiction essays including her story championing the comeback of the small, independent, book store. (Photo by Jesse Dittmar for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Monday, September 12, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 12, 2016
    Monday on the NewsHour, Hillary Clinton takes a break from campaigning after a pneumonia diagnosis. We explore how a candidate’s health can become a campaign issue. Also: Lifelong Republicans in Colorado rethink their loyalty, revealing corruption among South Sudan’s leaders, a struggling urban college rethinks its mission and puts its students to work and rebuilding an iconic Afghan palace.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
    U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives for ceremonies to mark the 15th anniversary of the September 11 attacks at the National 9/11 Memorial in New York, New York, United States September 11, 2016.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder  - RTSN7US
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 12, 2016
  • How much health data should candidates disclose?
    How much should voters know about the presidential candidates’ health? On Sunday, Hillary Clinton left a 9/11 memorial ceremony in lower Manhattan after a stumble. It was later revealed that the Democratic nominee had been diagnosed with pneumonia a few days before. Judy Woodruff speaks with University of Michigan’s Dr. Howard Markel about Clinton’s pneumonia and what voters have a right to know.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
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  • Clinton campaign pledges more health information
    Questions about Hillary Clinton’s health dominated headlines on Sunday after she left a 9/11 memorial ceremony in Manhattan. After it was confirmed that she was suffering from pneumonia, her campaign promised more information on her health. Meanwhile, Clinton’s comment that Donald Trump supporters are a “basket of deplorables” is providing fodder for her opponent's ads. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
    U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton climbs into her van outside her daughter Chelsea's home in New York, New York, United States September 11, 2016, after Clinton left ceremonies commemorating the 15th anniversary of the September 11 attacks feeling "overheated."  REUTERS/Brian Snyder  - RTSN8Q0
  • News Wrap: Assad insists he means to retain control of Syria
    In our news wrap Monday, a cease-fire in Syria, negotiated by the United States and Russia, took effect at sunset, despite government attacks in Aleppo. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad appeared in a recaptured Damascus suburb to say that he means to control the country again. Also, China rejected U.S. requests that it do more to intervene in North Korea after its latest nuclear test.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
    Rebel fighters rest with their weapons in Quneitra countryside, Syria. Photo by Alaa Al-Faqir/Reuters
  • Questioning the candidates’ transparency on health, charity
    Amid questions about her health, Hillary Clinton has caused a stir with comments about Donald Trump supporters. Gwen Ifill talks to Susan Page of USA Today and Tamara Keith of NPR about Clinton’s privacy about her pneumonia diagnosis and a Washington Post investigation into Trump’s charitable contributions.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
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  • In Colorado, some Republicans rethink their loyalty
    In most elections, Colorado has been a key battleground state. But this season, Hillary Clinton is polling far ahead of Donald Trump. Gwen Ifill speaks with voters in one of the state’s most conservative counties, home to five military installations and where Mitt Romney was a slam dunk in 2012. Now, some conservatives are turning to third-party candidates and even to the Democratic opposition.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
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  • Investigation reveals South Sudan leaders looted billions
    Founded in 2011, South Sudan is the world’s newest country; but for much of its statehood, it has been engulfed in civil war. The violence has killed tens of thousands and displaced more than two million people. A report released on Monday by rights group The Sentry accuses South Sudanese political leaders of making a fortune off the conflict. The NewsHour’s P.J. Tobia reports.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
    South Sudanese women and children queue to receive emergency food at the United Nations protection of civilians (POC) site 3 hosting about 30,000 people displaced during the recent fighting in Juba, South Sudan July 25, 2016. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian - RTSJJBH
  • The Texas college where students grow into workers
    At Paul Quinn College, where once there was a football field, now there’s an organic farm. It’s not just a symbol of renewal for this once-struggling historically black college in Dallas; it’s where students work to pay tuition. As part of our Rethinking College series, Hari Sreenivasan explores how students learn to understand the expectations of a career while gaining a liberal arts education.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
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  • Rebuilding a palace, restoring Afghanistan’s independence
    Nearly 100 years ago, Darulaman Palace rose as a symbol of modern, progressive, independent Afghanistan. The building has since deteriorated, and Afghanistan itself, shaken by war, is struggling to be self-sufficient. But the palace is being rebuilt, using all Afghan resources -- a symbol that the country is trying to stand on its own once again. Special correspondent Jennifer Glasse reports.
    Original Air Date: September 12, 2016
    Afghan men walk past the ruins of Darulaman Palace in Kabul November 9, 2012. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY) - RTR3A7DW

Sunday, September 11, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Sept. 11, 2016
    On this edition for Sunday, Sept. 11, Americans remember the terrorist attacks on the 15th anniversary of 9/11 and nearly 2 million Muslim pilgrims attend the hajj in Mecca. Later, learn how many responders are contending with health issues years after their work on the World Trade Center. Alison Stewart anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: September 11, 2016
    A woman lays her head on a row of names at the National September 11 Memorial, ahead of the 15th anniversary of the attacks in Manhattan, New York, September 10, 2016.  REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich - RTSN4P7
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 11, 2016
  • After 9/11, Americans 'summoned strength,' Obama says
    Fifteen years ago, the U.S. faced the worst attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor. In New York, family members read the names of the victims at a ceremony marking the anniversary, while Obama spoke at the Pentagon. Watch some of the highlights of the 15th anniversary.
    Original Air Date: September 11, 2016
    U.S. President Barack Obama places a wreath during a ceremony marking the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks at the Pentagon in Washington, U.S., September 11, 2016.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RTSN88Y
  • Looking beyond the polls in this year’s election
    Most national polls show Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton maintaining a lead over Republican Donald Trump. But with 57 days left, and a number of factors influencing the election, what comes next? NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Alison Stewart to discuss where the race stands.
    Original Air Date: September 11, 2016
    Supporters of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential Donald Trump cheer outside a campaign event in Williamson, West Virginia, United States, May 2, 2016.     REUTERS/Jim Young  - RTX2CIFI
  • 15 years after 9/11, illnesses compound for first responders
    Tens of thousands of people who worked at ground zero are still coping with the long-term health effects from the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history. 15 years after the attack, doctors and researchers continue to study the connection between the toxins at the site and physical ailments, along with complications from mental health issues like post-traumatic stress disorder. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Karla Murthy reports.
    Original Air Date: September 11, 2016
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Saturday, September 10, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Sept. 10, 2016
    On this edition for Saturday, Sept. 10, the U.S. and Russia agree to a new plans for a ceasefire in Syria that includes fighting the Islamic State together. Later, hear about five men at Guantanamo Bay who were blamed for planning the September 11 attacks 15 years ago but have yet to be tried. Alison Stewart anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: September 10, 2016
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov shake hands at the conclusion of their press conference following their meeting in Geneva, Switzerland where they discussed the crisis in Syria September 9, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - RTSN25I
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 10, 2016
  • These vivid NYC murals spotlight climate-threatened birds
    According to the National Audubon Society, climate change poses a serious threat to a large number of North America’s birds. But a street art project in New York City aims to call attention to their plight by creating large-scale murals of the birds. NewsHour Weekend Correspondent Megan Thompson reports.
    Original Air Date: September 10, 2016
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  • U.S. and Russia create joint plan to defeat ISIS
    The U.S. and Russia have embarked on a new plan to end Syria’s civil war that calls for a ceasefire in the country that will take effect Monday. If the truce lasts for a week, the U.S. and Russia will join forces to attack terrorist organizations including the Islamic State. David Sanger, a New York Times national security correspondent who just returned from Geneva, joins Alison Stewart to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 10, 2016
    A woman walks past a damaged building after an airstrike in the rebel held Douma neighbourhood of Damascus, Syria September 9, 2016. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh - RTX2OU3C
  • Should 9/11 trials be held at Guantanamo Bay?
    The five men blamed for planning the attacks of September 11 have yet to be tried in a military commission. Nearly 15 years after that day, they remain detained at the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Now, some critics are asking if federal trials based in the U.S. are more effective in prosecuting alleged terrorists. NewsHour Weekend's Phil Hirschkorn reports.
    Original Air Date: September 10, 2016
    A U.S. Army guard stands in a corridor of cells in Camp Five, a facility at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba September 4, 2007. This photo has been reviewed by the U.S. Military. The names and nationalities of detainees cannot be revealed and facial identification is not permitted by the U.S. Military.    REUTERS/Joe Skipper     (UNITED STATES) - RTR1TFUK

Friday, September 9, 2016

  • Visiting the 9/11 memorials with those most closely affected
    There are three national memorials that honor the victims of the 9/11 attacks. For some, they provide a mechanism of healing, for others, a chance to remember, and still for others, a way to understand the historical significance of that day’s catastrophic events. The NewsHour asked the victims’ families what the memorials mean to them.
    Original Air Date: September 9, 2016
    New York Police Department Joint Terrorism Task Force Detective Patrick Lantry, who was at the scene of the World Trade Center on 9-11, visits the Flight 93 National Memorial, which officially opened yesterday in Shanksville, Pennsylvania September 11, 2015. The $50m visitor center designed by Paul Murdoch commemorates the 40 passengers and crew who died near Shanksville, Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001, when one of the four planes overtaken by al Qaeda terrorists crashed into a Pennsylvania field.  A 9-11 memorial ceremony will take place this morning. REUTERS/Mark Makela - RTSN9G
  • North Dakota pipeline protesters vow to fight on
    There’s been a months-long standoff over the construction of a $3.8 billion pipeline extension designed to run near tribal land in North Dakota. On Friday, a federal judge denied the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request to stop the project. But minutes later, three federal agencies asked the company to voluntarily put the project on hold. Lisa Desjardins speaks with William Brangham for more.
    Original Air Date: September 9, 2016
    A protester demonstrates against the Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. September 9, 2016.  REUTERS/Andrew Cullen - RTX2OVHV
  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 9, 2016
    Friday on the NewsHour, North Korea conducts its biggest nuclear test yet, sparking global condemnation. Also: A judge’s refusal to block a pipeline project in North Dakota sparks outrage, Shields and Brooks weigh in on the week’s news, a look at the renewed fight to push back the Taliban, plus what the 9/11 memorials mean to the victims’ families.
    Original Air Date: September 9, 2016
    Ryoo Yong-gyu, Earthquake and Volcano Monitoring Division Director, points at where seismic waves observed in South Korea came from, during a media briefing at Korea Meteorological Administration in Seoul, South Korea, September 9, 2016.  REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX2OQYK
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 9, 2016
  • Shields and Brooks on high stakes for debate moderators
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the presidential candidates’ performances on NBC’s “Commander-in-Chief Forum,” as well as that of the forum moderator, plus possible explanations for a tightening in the presidential polls and more.
    Original Air Date: September 9, 2016
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