Thursday, December 29, 2016

  • What it means that U.S. is not part of the Syria cease-fire
    There is a new cease-fire agreement in Syria, but this time without the U.S. at the negotiating table. Will it last when so many others have failed? William Brangham speaks with Andrew Tabler of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and Joshua Landis of the University of Oklahoma about the symbolic significance of the move and what’s next for the rebels, the Assad regime and Syria.
    Original Air Date: December 29, 2016
  • U.S. retaliates to expose, dissuade Russian aggression
    The Obama administration wanted to send a message to Russia and top levels of its government: there will be consequences for election meddling and other aggressions. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Lisa Monaco, special assistant to the president, about the intended impact of the retaliatory measures announced by President Obama.
    Original Air Date: December 29, 2016

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

  • The shows you should have watched in 2016
    What were the best TV or streaming shows of 2016? Jeffrey Brown sits down with television critics UPROXX’s Alan Sepinwall and NPR’s Eric Deggans to discuss their picks.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016
  • News Wrap: Trump touts jobs coming to the U.S.
    In our news wrap Wednesday, President-elect Donald Trump announced new jobs coming to the U.S. from telecom giant Sprint and satellite firm OneWeb. Speaking late in the afternoon at his Mar-a-Lago resort, Mr. Trump said it’s all part of a Japanese billionaire's pledge to invest $50 billion in the U.S. Also, President Obama has designated new national monuments in Utah and Nevada.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016
  • What does Kerry’s speech mean for U.S.-Israel relations?
    With Secretary of State John Kerry’s tough, parting words on Israel and the recent UN Security Council resolution vote, former State Department officials James Jeffrey and Ilan Goldberg join Hari Sreenivasan to examine the state of relations between the two countries and what may come next under the Trump administration.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016
  • Can Trump change Washington?
    “Drain the swamp” was one of President-elect Donald Trump’s frequent refrains on the campaign trail. Lisa Desjardins talks with Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, and Paul Miller, president of The National Institute for Lobbying & Ethics, about the president-elect’s proposals and their potential consequences.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016
    December 28, 2016
  • The science that shaped 2016
    What did 2016 mean for science? Science correspondent Miles O’Brien sits down with William Brangham to discuss some of the more remarkable discoveries, innovations and setbacks this year, including the confirmation one of Einstein's major predictions, the global outbreak of Zika, a breakthrough in gene editing, self-driving cars and more.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016
    December 28, 2016
  • This inner city school is a bridge to empowerment
    In one of the poorest and most violent neighborhoods in Brooklyn, in one of the most segregated school systems in the country, principal Nadia Lopez is trying to help kids defy the odds. Lopez talks to special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault about how she’s adopted teaching methods and curricula with an understanding of where the students come from and what they need to succeed.
    Original Air Date: December 28, 2016

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

  • What we know--and don't--about Trump’s charitable foundation
    On Monday, President-elect Trump posted two tweets staunchly defending his charitable organization, the Donald J. Trump Foundation, as generous and efficient. But some say the comments are misleading or downright false, considering an ongoing New York investigation into the charity's practices, questions around a donation to a Florida politician and other criticism. Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016
  • This school is caring for kids when addicted parents can’t
    In opioid-stricken West Virginia, this school is taking on the role of parent. Lisa Stark of Education Week visits Cottageville Elementary, where students often lack food, clothes and transportation because of drug-addicted parents. In addition to increasing communication with local law enforcement, the school has created a mentor program that pairs neglected kids with role models they can trust.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016
  • The best books of 2016, according to 2 best-selling authors
    What were the best books of 2016? Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with best-selling authors Jacqueline Woodson and Daniel Pink at popular Washington, D.C., bookstore Politics and Prose to discuss their picks.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016
  • Are we witnessing a pre-inauguration power struggle?
    The period since Election Day has been characterized by major policy decisions on the part of President Obama and an unconventional transition for President-elect Trump. To discuss these active few weeks and provide context, Hari Sreenivasan is joined by presidential historian Michael Beschloss and April Ryan of American Urban Radio Networks.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016
  • Aleppo’s survivors face a grim, uncertain future
    Last week, the Syrian government declared that it had retaken full control of Aleppo from rebel forces. But this success came at a high cost: survivors have lost their homes and family members, and many have been severely wounded. Their future may lie in refugee camps. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson visits Aleppo to speak to those who outlasted the years of war.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016
  • Four more books our critics loved this year
    What were the best books of 2016? Best-selling authors Jacqueline Woodson and Daniel Pink shared their favorites on our show, but we couldn't fit all their picks. Here are 4 more favorites.
    Original Air Date: December 27, 2016

Monday, December 26, 2016

  • Jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd on musical intoxication
    For the latest installment in our music series, the NewsHour’s Frank Carlson caught up with jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd. Lloyd reflects on his lifelong love of music, his childhood in the musical haven of Memphis and why he believes jazz is the genre of “freedom and wonder.”
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016
  • Another bloody weekend in violence-stricken Chicago
    It was yet another bloody holiday weekend in Chicago; five more people were also shot Monday morning, bringing the 3-day toll to nearly 50. To examine why violence is so entrenched in the city and to see how residents are trying to change that, we turn to a report from John Yang's visit to Chicago earlier this year.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016
  • What George Michael’s career meant for music and sexuality
    One of pop’s biggest stars in the 1980s and '90s, George Michael died on Sunday at age 53. Michael shot to fame as a member of the duo Wham! and then embarked upon a successful solo career. Tim Teeman of The Daily Beast joins William Brangham to discuss Michael's music and personal struggles, his openness about his sexuality and the legacy he leaves behind.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016
  • An Israeli author on the country’s founding -- and future
    Amos Oz grew up in Israel in the early years of its statehood. Now, in his first book in over a decade, the writer looks back at that time through the eyes of three characters -- each at a different life stage and with a distinctive attitude toward the new state. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Oz to discuss his writing process, the “gift of literature" and prospects for a two-state solution.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016
  • Greek village welcomes migrants, while others turn them away
    Amidst the wave of anti-migrant sentiment coursing through Europe, one village has shown a rare level of hospitality to those making the journey across the Mediterranean. In Skala Sykaminia, located on the Greek island of Lesbos, Nobel-nominated villagers rescue and shelter migrants -- but they're an exception to the rule. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016
  • Will Trump’s unconventional interjections translate to policy?
    President-elect Trump has defied tradition by inserting himself into policy matters prior to taking office. William Brangham speaks with Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Stuart Rothenberg of The Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report to discuss Mr. Trump's messaging and motivation, his vow to dissolve his charitable foundation and anticipating an unconventional presidency.
    Original Air Date: December 26, 2016

Sunday, December 25, 2016

  • Chefs in Europe experiment with insects
    In Europe, adventurous eaters are calling crickets, mealworms and grasshoppers a new “super food” due to their high levels of essential amino and fatty acids. Eating insects also has ecological benefits because they can be easier to farm than other animals. But they are still uncommon in food throughout Europe and the U.S. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Amy Guttman reports.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2016
  • Preserving the history of America’s first black filmmakers
    In the early part of the 20th century, black filmmakers were forced to work outside the white Hollywood mainstream -- and produced around 500 films, mainly for black audiences. To preserve this history, the company Kino Lorber released a five-disc collection this year containing 20 hours of these films. Executive producer Paul Miller joins NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Karla Murthy.
    Original Air Date: December 25, 2016

Saturday, December 24, 2016

  • Iconic Portland skate park on front lines of gentrification
    When skaters built a park in an industrial area of Portland beneath the Burnside Bridge 25 years ago without the city’s permission, they did not anticipate the major housing developments that are taking shape there today. Now, what has become a subculture cornerstone is now under pressure -- even as developers say they will respect that history. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker reports.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2016
  • ‘Othello: The Remix’ gives Shakespeare the hip-hop treatment
    At the Westside Theatre in New York City, audiences are watching "Othello: the Remix," a retelling of William Shakespeare's classic play that transforms the protagonist into a rising hip-hop star. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano sits down with the Q Brothers, the rap and theater artists who created the show, and other cast members.
    Original Air Date: December 24, 2016

Friday, December 23, 2016

  • Holiday music from U.S. military around the world
    From around the world, members of the United States military sing the classic Christmas carol, “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” The segment was done in collaboration with the Pentagon.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2016
  • Donald Trump’s fighting words are worrying to some
    President-elect Trump tweeted this week that the U.S. needs to build up its nuclear arsenal. He also declared that should an arms race occur, the U.S. would triumph over any adversary. John Yang talks to Joseph Cirincione of the Ploughshares Fund and Matthew Kroenig of Georgetown University about the reaction to Mr. Trump’s words and the status of American weaponry.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2016
  • Why didn’t the US veto the UN’s rebuke of Israel?
    The United States has broken with decades of diplomacy by abstaining on a U.N. rebuke of Israel, rather than vetoing it in support of its longtime ally. The Security Council voted 14 to 0 that Israel is committing a “flagrant violation” of international law by building settlements on land Palestinians want. Judy Woodruff speaks with Ben Rhodes, deputy national security adviser, about the decision.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2016
  • News Wrap: FBI says ISIS is urging holiday attacks on U.S.
    In our news wrap Friday, the FBI is warning that Islamic State supporters are urging attacks on holiday gatherings and churches in the U.S. Also, the suspect who plowed a truck into a Berlin Christmas market has been shot dead. Anis Amri was killed by a police officer after an early-morning shootout in Milan.
    Original Air Date: December 23, 2016

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