Monday, August 22, 2016

  • Meet the couple on a mission to end hunger in their town
    The idea started at David and Alicia Blais’ dinner table: what if they could end hunger in their town? Their traveling trailer delivers meals to 200-300 people a night, motivated by the memory of their son, Daniel. Special correspondent Tina Martin of WGBH reports from Framingham, Massachusetts.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2016
  • Normal rules of campaign spending don’t apply to Trump
    Hillary Clinton’s campaign spending has massively exceeded Donald Trump’s. What does that mean for the race? Judy Woodruff speaks with Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and NPR’s Tamara Keith about campaign cash, why the Republican nominee is saying he will be “firm but fair” in his deportation policy and a new round of questions and perceptions about Clinton’s email.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2016
  • Clinton is vastly outspending Trump on ads
    To date, the Clinton campaign has spent $319 million, while the Trump campaign has spent $89.5 million. That’s according to new Federal Election Commission reports that spell out how much each candidate has raised and spent. Judy Woodruff learns more the current campaign spending and the role of money in the race from The Washington Post’s Matea Gold.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2016
  • The Syrian volunteers who risk their lives to save others
    Once tailors, bakers, pharmacists, some 3,000 ordinary Syrians are now the unwitting heroes of the Syrian war. Nicknamed "the White Helmets," members of the Syrian Civil Defense work under the harshest conditions to claw through the remains of buildings flattened by barrel bombs, the Syrian regime's weapon of choice. Special correspondent Marcia Biggs reports from Turkey.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2016
  • How legal questions about transgender rules affect schools
    Just in time for the start of school, a federal judge in Texas has blocked the Obama administration's directive regarding transgender bathrooms and locker rooms. That rule said that students should be able to choose the facilities that match their gender identity. William Brangham talks with Education Week’s Evie Blad about how schools are responding.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2016

Sunday, August 21, 2016

  • California wildfires take a toll on firefighters
    A fire that burned through 58 square miles and destroyed 103 residences in southern California last week is now 83 percent contained, even as six other wildfires continue burning around the state. NewsHour Weekend Correspondent Mori Rothman reports the toll that the constant alarms are taking a toll on firefighters.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2016
  • How Florida is handling invasive lionfish
    Florida's southern coast is one of the most popular dive spots in the world, home to the only tropical coral reef in the continental U.S. But hundreds of fish species here are in danger from the worst-known case of an invasive species: lionfish. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Yasmeen Qureshi has the story.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2016
  • Brazil’s president to begin impeachment trial
    As the summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro end, Brazilians will turn their attention to the start of an impeachment trial Thursday of the nation’s suspended President Dilma Rousseff, who stands accused of violating budget laws. Wall Street Journal reporter Paolo Trevisani joins Allison Stewart.
    Original Air Date: August 21, 2016
  • Black-and-white portraits from apartheid-era South Africa
    South Africa’s apartheid era -- when segregation was legal and the white minority ruled -- is remembered as a time of rampant violence and divisiveness. But a photo exhibit this summer showcases the private lives that some South Africans carved out amid this environment.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2016

Saturday, August 20, 2016

  • Why so many gay and bisexual men can’t donate blood in the U.S.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is asking for new scientific research as it reevaluates a controversial policy banning men from donating blood if they admit to having had sex with another man in the past year. Gay rights advocates say the rules are not based in science, but on decades of stigma regarding gay men and AIDS. NewsHour Weekend’s Ivette Feliciano reports.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2016
  • Justice Department will not renew contracts with private prisons
    Twelve percent of inmates serving sentences for federal crimes in the U.S. are located in private prisons. This week, the Justice Department announced it would phase out its contracts with those prisons, following findings that they are less safe and more expensive than government-run prisons. NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson joins Allison Stewart to discuss.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2016
  • Aetna announces it will leave health care markets in 11 states
    Since the Affordable Care Act took effect three years ago, more than 20 million more Americans have obtained health coverage. But this week, Aetna -- one of the nation's largest private insurers -- decided to drop out of Affordable Care Act markets next year in 11 states, leaving consumers there with fewer options. Bloomberg healthcare reporter Zach Tracer joins Allison Stewart.
    Original Air Date: August 20, 2016

Friday, August 19, 2016

  • Shields and Rubin on Trump's staff and Clinton's ethics
    This week, the Trump campaign underwent possibly its biggest overhaul yet -- the candidate made major staffing changes and publicly said he regrets some past comments. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton is excelling in the polls, but her emails and foundation still haunt her. For the political scoop, Judy Woodruff speaks with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • State Department admits Iran payment was used as ‘leverage’
    In January, Iran released American hostages in a development coinciding with a U.S. payout of $400 million -- money that had been owed for decades. The Obama administration previously denied a connection between the two events, but on Friday, the State Department modified its response, saying the money was used as “leverage.” Judy Woodruff talks to department spokesman Adm. John Kirby for more.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • A portrait of turmoil in South Sudan, from behind the lens
    South Sudan, the world’s newest country, is again on the brink of a civil war. Photographer Sebastian Rich has covered the conflict in the country for more than four decades, and he is there now on a mission with UNICEF, documenting the turmoil and the toll it has taken on civilians. The area is plagued by malnutrition and the lowest education levels in the world. John Yang speaks with Rich.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • TV ads, resignation and ‘regret’ for shifting Trump campaign
    On Friday, Paul Manafort became the second head of Donald Trump's campaign to resign. The Republican nominee was in Baton Rouge surveying the damage from devastating flooding this past week. As for Hillary Clinton, the New York Times reported she told FBI investigators that Colin Powell had advised her to use a private email account for unclassified information. Lisa Desjardins has more.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • News Wrap: CDC warns pregnant women to avoid Miami Beach
    In our news wrap Friday, the CDC warned pregnant women to avoid traveling to Florida’s Miami Beach in light of the recent Zika outbreak there. Officials say mosquitoes are now transmitting the virus in the tourist destination; five local cases have been reported. Also, 86,500 people have filed for federal aid in the wake of the Louisiana floods, and many remain without power or in shelters.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • Lochte scandal casts shadow over Rio, but Bolt still shines
    The Olympics conclude this weekend, but the news coming out of Rio is still nonstop. Four U.S. swimmers who said they had been robbed now admit fabricating their story, while Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt could earn his ninth career gold. Also, the Paralympics are in jeopardy due to budgetary issues. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Christine Brennan of USA Today and NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro for details.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016
  • Legendary filmmaker explores the internet and human nature
    In his newest film, Werner Herzog is again asking existential questions -- this time, about the internet. In “Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World,” released in theaters on Friday, Herzog analyzes this ever-expanding fortress of information, and how it promises possibilities of both progress and catastrophe. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Herzog about his latest inquiry into human nature.
    Original Air Date: August 19, 2016

Thursday, August 18, 2016

  • In Aleppo, the fight to survive can begin even before birth
    In Aleppo, Syria's largest city and a stronghold of the Islamic State, warfare usually means an end to life, not its beginning. Recently, a woman nearing labor and walking to the hospital was seriously injured in a bombing. But after an emergency cesarean section and a long struggle to help the infant breathe, a cry was heard. Filmmaker Waad Al-Kateab documents this dual fight for life.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • 2016 Hutchins Forum: Race & the Race to the White House
    Join us for a discussion on Race and the White House, moderated by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Featuring Charles Blow, Donna Brazile, Armstrong Williams and Leah Wright-Rigueur. Additional remarks by Lawrence D. Bobo.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • The editor of The New Yorker helps writers find their voice
    David Remnick has been a writer for The New Yorker since 1992 and its editor since 1998. In the age of modern media, his job requires not only producing a quality magazine, but also keeping up financially and technologically. One of his favorite experiences is encountering a young writer with something new to say. Here he shares his Brief but Spectacular philosophy on editing -- and being edited.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • Wall Street millionaire shares healthy food with the needy
    Sam Polk was making millions on Wall Street when he had a life-changing revelation: he wanted to help those in need. His focus became so-called "food deserts," regions with limited access to healthy food. Polk founded Everytable to serve nutritious meals at minimal prices for low-income populations, but higher prices for customers who can afford them. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • In an unconventional race, even the electoral map surprises
    During most election years, the electoral map is fairly predictable, except for ten or twelve swing states. But in this year's highly unorthodox race, Hillary Clinton has taken a substantial lead in five of these battlegrounds and is pursuing states that are typically solid red. Judy Woodruff talks to Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler, Tampa Bay Times’ Adam Smith and Lisa Desjardins for analysis.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • News Wrap: California fire advances; Syrian prison horrors
    In our news wrap Thursday, the fast-moving fire just 60 miles east of Los Angeles flared even more; 1500 firefighters are battling flames only 4 percent contained. The inferno has charred nearly 50 square miles since Tuesday and forced 82,000 to evacuate. Also, Amnesty International reports that 18,000 detainees have died in Syrian government prisons, while others suffered torture and disease.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016
  • How Louisiana plans to rebuild after damaging floods
    As the Louisiana flooding begins to subside, the state looks toward rebuilding. The disaster affected over 20 parishes, including areas outside flood zones -- meaning residents there do not have flood insurance. William Brangham speaks with Billy Nungesser, Louisiana's lieutenant governor, about how the state is planning to use FEMA funds, the help of volunteers and Red Cross shelters to recover.
    Original Air Date: August 18, 2016

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

  • The NSA code breach in the context of overall cybersecurity
    On Saturday, programming code for National Security Agency hacking tools was shared online. The content appears to be legitimate, but it is not clear if it was intentionally hacked or accidentally leaked. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with The Washington Post’s Ellen Nakashima and Paul Vixie of Farsight Security about where this development fits in the context of other recent cybersecurity breaches.
    Original Air Date: August 17, 2016
  • On the longest-flowing volcano, searching for future clues
    Hawaii’s Kilauea has been erupting for over 30 years, making it the longest-flowing volcano on earth. Because of this remarkable activity, it is also currently the most researched. Geologist Mike Garcia has studied Kilauea for decades and believes that analyzing the chemical composition of pieces of the volcano may yield clues to its future behavior. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports.
    Original Air Date: August 17, 2016

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