Wednesday, November 20, 2013

  • President Obama honors of 16 Americans with Medal of Freedom
    President Obama awarded the Medal of Freedom to 16 new honorees, the highest award given to civilians in the United States. The medal winners represented a diverse set of accomplishments, from scientists and sports stars to musicians, activists and politicians. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Astronaut Hadfield shares 'unbeatable point of inspiration'
    Col. Chris Hadfield captured the world's curiosity when he tweeted videos of everyday life on the space station and covered David Bowie's song "Space Oddity." Science correspondent Miles O'Brien talks to the retired Canadian astronaut, author of "An Astronauts Guide to Life on Earth," about the importance of space exploration.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Extending canceled health care plans has legal complications
    Kathleen Baker of Denver hoped to keep her health care plan into the future, but she was one of the millions whose policy was canceled under the Affordable Care Act. Judy Woodruff talks to NPR's Julie Rovner for the bigger picture on whether Americans will be able to extend their canceled policies through 2014.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Aid reaches remote parts of Philippines but challenges ahead
    As an island nation, the Philippines presents a geographical challenge to typhoon relief efforts, but aid has finally started to arrive in some of the most remote regions. Gwen Ifill talks to Nancy Lindborg of the U.S. Agency for International Development about the challenge ahead in helping survivors rebuild their lives.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Divided Senate debates action for military sexual assault
    The Senate began debate on an amendment to the Defense Authorization Act proposed by New York Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand that would take the decision to prosecute military sexual assault cases out of the chain of command. But as Kwame Holman reports, the bill is up against some opposition from senators and military leaders.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Trust concerns delay substantive talk about Iran in Geneva
    World powers gathered in Geneva for the third round of intensive negotiations over Iran's nuclear program. The first day of renewed talks featured some positive interactions as well as a few "sour notes." Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss what factors are affecting the start of substantive discussion.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: Conspiracy or not?
    In 1976, the House of Representatives created the Select Committee on Assassinations to further investigate Kennedy’s shooting. In 1979, it reported the assassination was likely the result of a conspiracy. But after years of news coverage and investigations, NewsHour co-founders Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer agree that there was insufficient evidence to conclude any theory of conspiracy.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: How presidential security has changed
    President Barack Obama travels in a heavily armored Chevrolet Cadillac, dubbed the Beast, specially designed to protect the head of state and has a Secret Service made up of 3,200 special agents and 1,300 uniformed officers. But PBS NewsHour co-founder Robert MacNeil remembers the 1960s when it was not nearly as difficult to get close to the commander-in-chief.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: A nation grieves the loss of Kennedy
    After President John F. Kennedy’s death, a nation grieved. Hundreds of thousands of people lined up at the U.S. Capitol to view the president as he lay in state. As reporters, NewsHour co-founders Jim Lehrer and Robert MacNeil gathered any information to make sense of the tragedy. But it was personal too. Lehrer and MacNeil reflect on the profound impact of the Kennedy’s death on their lives.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: Confirming Kennedy’s death
    Without the conveniences of cell phones or Internet access, Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer spent a lot of time finding telephone landlines to report details on President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. MacNeil describes the moment when then-press secretary Malcolm Kilduff confirmed that Kennedy had died of a gunshot wound to the brain.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: The president has been shot
    As a reporter for the Dallas Times-Herald, Jim Lehrer was still at the airport when he heard that President John F. Kennedy had been shot. Judy Woodruff talks to NewsHour co-founders Lehrer and Robert MacNeil about their search for facts after the shooting on Kennedy's health and the police investigations of suspected shooters.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: Gunshots ring in Dealey Plaza
    As a correspondent for NBC News, Robert MacNeil rode in one of the press buses, seven cars behind President John F. Kennedy’s limousine. The motorcade entered Dealey Plaza in Dallas when MacNeil heard three loud bangs. Judy Woodruff talks to NewsHour co-founder MacNeil about his reaction to the gunfire, before anyone knew the shots had killed the president.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: The Kennedys arrive in Dallas
    When the Kennedy family arrived at Love Field airport in Dallas, they were greeted by thousands of supporters. As reporters, NewsHour co-founders Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer witnessed the warm welcome. MacNeil describes the unexpected scene on the tarmac and along the motorcade route on Nov. 22, 1963.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • "Lab before blab" lights up elementary school science
    Elementary school teacher Leigh Ann Anderson does "the lab before the blab", giving her students lab experiments and letting them work through solutions before delivering the science lesson. Fourth graders must make a light bulb glow with tin foil and a battery, and fifth graders need to figure out force and trajectory to throw a rubber cat one meter.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: The decision to remove the ‘bubble top’
    On Nov. 22, 1963, the Secret Service prepared for President John F. Kennedy’s procession through Dallas. Agents removed an optional feature of the president's 1961 Lincoln Continental, a plastic cover to protect the family from bad weather. As a Dallas Herald-Tribune reporter, Jim Lehrer recounts the decision to remove the “bubble top,” and whether the Plexiglass could have saved Kennedy.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013
  • Covering JFK: Anti-Kennedy sentiment in Texas prior to visit
    There were many Texans in 1963 who despised John F. Kennedy and everything he stood for. NewsHour co-founder Jim Lehrer talks to Judy Woodruff about the growing anti-Kennedy sentiment in Dallas prior to the president’s fateful visit to the city on Nov. 22.
    Original Air Date: November 20, 2013

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

  • Screenwriter John Ridley on '12 Years a Slave'
    In depicting American slavery, Hollywood has long left some of the most brutal realities largely unseen. But the filmmakers behind "12 Years a Slave" tried not to flinch in showing the full system of human subjugation. Jeffrey Brown talks to screenwriter John Ridley about the challenge of humanizing a dehumanizing institution.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
  • Lincoln's words spark debate, dedication to American freedom
    President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address articulated a powerful message 150 years ago that endures today. How did a speech with so few words come to effect such great meaning in American history? Drew Gilpin Faust of Harvard University and Richard Norton Smith of George Mason University join Jeffrey Brown to offer reflections.
    Original Air Date: November 19, 2013
  • Judicial confirmation impasse impacting American justice?
    In recent weeks, three of President Obama's nominees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit have failed to pass the Senate. Gwen Ifill gets views on the impact of the standoff from Caroline Fredrickson of the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and Carrie Severino of the Judicial Crisis Network.
    Original Air Date: November 19, 2013
  • Massachusetts seeks cost-cutting that improves health care
    With an outcome of near universal health coverage for residents of the Bay State, the 2006 reform of Massachusetts' health care system has also come with higher prices. Paul Solman reports on the state's effort to slow rising costs by looking for ways to cut spending on care that doesn't add value or improve health.
    Original Air Date: November 19, 2013
  • Susan Rice: 'Now is not the time for new sanctions' on Iran
    President Obama urged lawmakers to hold off on seeking new sanctions against Iran, prompting some senators to urge the president to remain tough on that country. National Security Advisor Susan Rice talks to Judy Woodruff about the upcoming round of Iran nuclear negotiations, as well as challenges in Afghanistan and Syria.
    Original Air Date: November 19, 2013
  • Will JPMorgan's settlement set incentives for better banking
    JP Morgan Chase agreed to pay a record $13 billion in fines and compensation to investors and struggling homeowners. The nation's largest bank admitted it misrepresented mortgage-backed securities that collapsed in 2008. Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Lynn Stout of Cornell University and banking consultant Bert Ely.
    Original Air Date: November 19, 2013

Monday, November 18, 2013

  • Screenwriter John Ridley on '12 Years a Slave'
    In depicting American slavery, Hollywood has long left some of the most brutal realities largely unseen. But the filmmakers behind "12 Years a Slave" tried not to flinch in showing the full system of human subjugation. Jeffrey Brown talks to screenwriter John Ridley about the challenge of humanizing a dehumanizing institution.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
    Chiwetel Ejiofor
  • Screenwriter John Ridley on '12 Years a Slave'
    In depicting American slavery, Hollywood has long left some of the most brutal realities largely unseen. But the filmmakers behind "12 Years a Slave" tried not to flinch in showing the full system of human subjugation. Jeffrey Brown talks to screenwriter John Ridley about the challenge of humanizing a dehumanizing institution.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
  • ATF director Todd discusses ending urban violence
    In part two of our interview with B. Todd Jones, the new director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, he talks to Judy Woodruff about goals for his agency and past high-profile controversies, including "Fast and Furious" and terrorists profiting from cigarette smuggling.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
  • Silicon Valley entrepreneurs set sights on space travel
    Move over NASA, Silicon Valley is joining the space race. Entrepreneurs from the nation's high-tech hub are designing lunar landers, making plans to mine the moon and gearing up to blast off into commercial space flight. Thuy Vu of KQED reports on how private ventures and investors are investing in space exploration.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
  • Tax credit helps end a family's search for health insurance
    The Montez family of Colorado have been living without insurance, forcing them to avoid care and pay for medical expenses out of pocket. But now they are able to afford a health care plan under the Affordable Care Act. Julie Rovner of NPR joins Judy Woodruff to explain how tax subsidies are helping families get coverage.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013
  • Timing of strong storms in the Midwest is 'very unusual'
    The string of storms that devastated the Midwest over the weekend was very rare for the timing, both time of year and time of day. Gwen Ifill talks to Howard Bluestein of the University of Oklahoma about the special conditions that triggered the deadly tornadoes.
    Original Air Date: November 18, 2013

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