Thursday, January 28, 2016

  • How Jad Abumrad turned childhood awkwardness into his job
    Jad Abumrad, co-host of Radiolab, says he grew up in a kind of in-between space, as an Arab kid in Nashville. That experience molded him as a journalist, able to stand back as an observer, and to allow the fumbling awkwardness of discovery to come through. Now Abumrad offers his Brief But Spectacular take on why radio will never die.
    Original Air Date: January 28, 2016
    Jad Abumrad
  • Remembering Challenger, disaster that shook up space flight
    Thirty years ago, the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded just after takeoff, a tragedy that was broadcast on live television. Nationwide excitement for the mission turned to horror over the crew of seven who died on board. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss how the disaster changed space travel and the perception of NASA.
    Original Air Date: January 28, 2016
    The Challenger crew takes a break during countdown training at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in this January 9, 1986 NASA file photograph. L-R: Teacher-in-Space payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe, payload specialist Gregory Jarvis, and astronauts Judith A. Resnik, mission specialist; Francis R. (Dick) Scobee, mission commander; Ronald E. McNair, mission specialist; Mike J. Smith, pilot; and Ellison S. Onizuka, mission specialist. The NASA lost seven of its own on the morning of January 28, 1986, when a booster engine failed, causing the Shuttle Challenger to break apart just 73 seconds after launch.   REUTERS/NASA/Handout  (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY OBITUARY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - RTR3D375

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

  • Why wildlife preserves in Kenya resemble war zones
    With rhinoceros horn now more valuable than gold on the black market, poaching has reached unprecedented levels. Some wildlife preserves in Africa resemble war zones, as rangers struggle to keep pace with poachers, who may have ties to terrorist groups. Daphne Matziaraki and James Pace-Cornsilk, students at UC Berkeley, traveled to Kenya to learn more.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
    Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) rangers take Oath of Allegiance during the passing out parade for 592 rangers at the Law Enforcement Academy Manyani in Tsavo West National Park, October 27, 2015. Kenya Wildlife Services Law Enforcement Academy conducts training programs for uniformed personnel including general security courses for staff from institutions outside the wildlife conservation fraternity especially to combat poaching, KWS officials said. Poaching has surged in the last few years across sub-Saharan Africa, where gangs kill elephants and rhinos to feed Asian demand for ivory and horns for use in folk medicines. Kenya has imposed stiffer penalties -- longer jail terms and bigger fines -- for wildlife poaching or trafficking, saying poaching is harming tourism, a major earner of foreign exchange. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya - RTX1TIJK
  • Freed reporter works to reclaim life after Iran detention
    Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian was released from an Iranian prison after more than 500 days of detention, as part of an exchange between the two countries. Martin Baron, executive editor of The Washington Post, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Rezaian’s release and what may lie ahead.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
    Jason Rezaian, Washington Post reporter and one of the U.S. citizens recently released from detention in Iran, poses to media together with his wife Yeganeh Salehi outside the Emergency Room of the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) in the southwestern town of Landstuhl, Germany, January 20, 2016. Rezaian was one of four American prisoners released by Iran ahead of the lifting of international sanctions on Iran January 16, 2016 as part of a deal between major powers and Iran to curb Tehran's nuclear program.   REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach - RTX2388C
  • The only girl in school to spark an interest in welding
    Kalei Kipp is the only girl in the welding program at her high school. Why don't more women go into that profession? Our Student Reporting Labs report as part of Outside the Box, a series on the ways that young people are challenging traditional gender stereotypes.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
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  • Keeping the memory of WWI alive with plans for a memorial
    Millions of Americans who served during the Great War may soon be memorialized in the nation’s capital. The winning design by 25-year-old architect Joe Weishaar was selected from more than 360 proposals for the National World War I Memorial in Washington. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
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  • A.I. program conquers world’s trickiest board game
    The Chinese board game Go is considered one of the most complex in the world, with trillions of possible move combinations. But scientists at Google have designed an artificial intelligence program capable of beating the top human players, a feat previously thought impossible. Hari Sreenivasan talks to science correspondent Miles O’Brien about the implications of this technological breakthrough.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
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  • Trump sidesteps debate as Clinton calls for one more
    Donald Trump continues to grab headlines even when he exits the stage. The Republican front-runner said he will shun the next debate because he feels one of the FOX News moderators is biased against him. Political director Lisa Desjardins offers a closer look and Gwen Ifill gets a campaign update from Paul Steinhauser of the NH1 News Network and O. Kay Henderson of Radio Iowa.
    Original Air Date: January 27, 2016
    U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Scott Morgan - RTX245TD

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

  • Days left before Iowa, intensity reigns on the trail
    Every day is now an intense fight for votes in the lead up to the nation's first election contest in Iowa. While Democrats engaged on questions of readiness and judgment at a forum in Des Moines, some Republicans tried playing up the idea of a less divisive rhetoric on the campaign trail. Political director Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
    U.S. Democratic presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders talks to reporters after a campaign event at the United Steelworkers Local in Des Moines, Iowa January 26, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTX243ZC
  • How will Obama's solitary confinement ban impact prisoners?
    President Obama has pledged to ban solitary confinement for juveniles in the federal prison system and to reform the rules for other prisoners. What effect will his executive actions have? Hari Sreenivasan discusses the proposed changes with Maurice Chammah of The Marshall Project and Shaka Senghor of #Cut50, who spent seven years in solitary confinement.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
    The prison yard at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, Oklahoma, July 16, 2015, is seen during a visit by US President Barack Obama. Obama is the first sitting US President to visit a federal prison, in a push to reform one of the most expensive and crowded prison systems in the world. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
  • What past elections can teach us about fear politics
    Fear of terrorism has been a recurring theme of the current presidential race -- from grave callbacks to November’s Paris attacks to promises of bans on Muslim immigrants -- but the tactic is nothing new in American politics. Judy Woodruff talks to Stephen Walt of Harvard University and Beverly Gage of Yale University for some historical perspective on fear in electoral politics.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
    People gather to protest against the United States' acceptance of Syrian refugees at the Washington State capitol in Olympia, Washington, November 20, 2015. REUTERS/David Ryder - RTS86MA
  • New guidelines suggest depression screenings amid pregnancy
    There's new evidence that postpartum depression is more common than previously believed, according to the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, which calls for women to be screened during pregnancy and again after giving birth. William Brangham discusses the recommendations with Dr. Hal Lawrence III of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
    Black pregnant woman holding her stomach at window
  • This boy dances in defiance of those who call it girly
    Sean Varner long tried to hide his love of dance from his peers. But over time, he's found a close group of friends who like him for who he is, and continues to use dance as a physical, emotional and creative outlet. Our Student Reporting Labs report as part of Outside the Box, a series on the ways that young people are challenging traditional gender stereotypes.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
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  • Should more kids skip college for workforce training?
    Of all the U.S. high school students who graduate high school and go on to college, a large proportion will never earn their degree. How can educators better train those who may struggle in trying to pick a course of study? One solution may lie in putting greater emphasis on high school vocational training, but critics disagree. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Education Week reports.
    Original Air Date: January 26, 2016
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Monday, January 25, 2016

  • State investigator named to Flint water crisis probe
    The massive lead contamination of the drinking water in Flint, Michigan, has put public officials in the hot seat for the way concerns and revelations were handled. Now the state's attorney general has named a former prosecutor to investigate whether any laws were broken, but there are questions about how independent the investigation will be. WIlliam Brangham talks with Judy Woodruff.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    A water collection device is handed out to citizens of Flint for testing  contaminated  water on in Flint, Michigan. A new report released Wednesday concluded that the primary responsibility for the Flint water crisis lied with the state. Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images
  • 5 years since uprising, Egyptian opposition demoralized
    It's been a tumultuous five years since Egyptians took to the street in mass protest. Now Egyptians are marking a somber and tense anniversary of a day that led to the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, the election and then military-led removal of Mohamed Morsi and the subsequent rise of the current president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi. Hari Sreenivasan talks with special correspondent Nick Schifrin.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    Security forces stand guard in Alexandria during the fifth anniversary of the uprising that ended the 30-year reign of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt, January 25, 2016.  REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih   - RTX23Y7W
  • Girl on the gridiron changes how her team sees gender
    It started as a bet with her mom, but Lexi Dressing won a spot as starting kicker on her South Carolina high school football team. Our Student Reporting Labs report as part of Outside the Box, a series on the ways that young people are challenging traditional gender stereotypes.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    football
  • Can candidates translate enthusiasm into caucus support?
    A week out from the start of voting in the race for president, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR sit down with Judy Woodruff to discuss the candidates’ rush in Iowa and other early states to garner solid support from voters.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    Politics Monday
  • News Wrap: Abnormal cold snap kills dozens in East Asia
    In our news wrap Monday, decades-low temperatures have swept across parts of Asia, causing more than 65 deaths and producing the first snow seen by the Chinese city of Guangzhou since 1967. Also, suicide bombers left more than 50 dead in Syria and Cameroon.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    Icicles are seen under a bridge handrail on the West Lake in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA. - RTX23VA3
  • Hunt for gold in Washington’s waterways dredges up conflict
    Gold fever is alive in the mountains of Washington state, but the use of new machinery in waterways is causing conflict with activists. Local fishermen are pushing for regulations on hydraulic dredging, a method that boosts the efficacy of small-scale mining operations but may cause lasting damage to fish populations in the area. Special correspondent Nils Cowan of KCTS reports.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
    Gold dredging in Washington state
  • An ancient Greek art form, preserved by catastrophe
    Fewer than 200 bronze sculptures from the Hellenistic era -- a period that began more than 2,000 years ago -- survive today. About a quarter of those are gathered in an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art called "Power and Pathos," which offers a view into the spread of ancient Greek culture around the world, and the rise of a new art form. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: January 25, 2016
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Sunday, January 24, 2016

  • Photos reveal that protecting animal habitats is working
    For nearly a decade, scientists have used motion-triggered cameras to capture animals living in protected areas around the world. Researchers from the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network have sifted through those pictures, which show that efforts to preserve habitats worldwide may be paying off. Lydia Beaudrot joins NewsHour's Stephen Fee to discuss.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2016
    Screen Shot 2016-01-24 at 5.44.41 PM
  • The legal, logistical obstacles of closing Guantánamo Bay
    Since the beginning of his presidency, President Barack Obama has vowed to close the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, which he says is expensive, unnecessary and serves as a recruitment tool for America's enemies. Miami Herald reporter Carol Rosenberg joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the legal and logistical obstacles of President Obama's goal.
    Original Air Date: January 24, 2016
    The Exercise yard at Camp 6 is pictured at the Camp Delta detention center for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay

Saturday, January 23, 2016

  • U.S., Turkey prepared for military solution ISIS in Syria
    Vice President Joe Biden says the United States and Turkey are prepared for a military solution in Syria if a political settlement is not possible. On Saturday, 45 opposition groups issued a statement saying they support a political process but the biggest players are still at odds. New York Times reporter Anne Barnard joins Alison Stewart via Skype from Beirut.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2016
    Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan (R) meets with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden in Istanbul, Turkey January 23, 2016, in this handout photo provided by the Presidential Palace. REUTERS/Kayhan Ozer/Presidential Palace/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. THE PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS.   - RTX23NXD
  • U.S. tightens Visa Waiver Program in wake of terror attacks
    As more radicalized foreigners join ISIS militants, U.S. officials this week tightened the Visa Waiver Program, which allows visitors from 38 countries to enter the U.S. for 90 days without a visa. This week, anyone from a Visa Waiver country who also has dual citizenship with Iran, Iraq, Syria or Sudan was forbidden from entering visa-free. The Washington Post's Karoun Demirjian discusses.
    Original Air Date: January 23, 2016
    WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09:  (L-R) Deputy Assistant Homeland Security Secretary Kelli Burriesci of the Office of Policy's Screening Coordination Office, Deputy Assistant Commissioner in Customs and Border Protection's Office of Field Operations John Wagner, Principal Deputy Coordinator for Counterterrorism in the State Department's Bureau of Counterterrorism Justin Siberell, Senior Director of Steptoe & Johnson LLP and former Director of the Homeland Security Department's Visa Waiver Program Marc Frey testify during a hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee December 9, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee held a hearing on "Roundtable - Strengthening the Visa Waiver Program After the Paris Attacks."  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Friday, January 22, 2016

  • Why activists are fighting over feral felines
    With an estimated 80 million feral cats in communities across the United States, there is growing a controversy on how to deal with them. Euthanizing cats has been the traditional approach, but many animal rights activists believe that approach is cruel and inhumane. Adithya Sambamurthy of Reveal for the Center for Investigative Reporting has the story.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2016
    BEIJING, CHINA - FEBRUARY 12: (CHINA OUT) A stray cat looks out of a slot at a little animal protection base on February 12, 2007 in Beijing, China. Beijing Little Animal Protection Association, the only government-approved animal protection institute in the city, estimated that Beijing has more than 400,000 stray cats scattered across the city's 2,400 communities. Beijing and neighbouring Hebei Province are establishing more homes for the increasing number of stray and illegal animals. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
  • Police use new training tactics to avoid deadly shootings
    Following two years of highly publicized deadly shootings by police officers, some police departments around the country are looking into new training methods they hope will not only reduce the number of officer-involved shootings, but also keep their officers in the field safer. NewsHour Special Correspondent Chris Bury reports.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2016
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  • Wi-Fi-enabled school buses leave no child offline
    The digital divide and lack of reliable Internet access at home can put low-income and rural students at a real disadvantage. So when superintendent Darryl Adams took over one of the poorest school district in the nation, he made it a top priority to help his students get online 24/7. Special correspondent David Nazar of PBS SoCal reports with PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs.
    Original Air Date: January 22, 2016
    No Child Left Offline_BD_frame_2402

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