Tuesday, October 29, 2013

  • What the lowlands can teach about warding off high water
    Superstorm Sandy showed U.S. coastal cities the damage water can do -- a threat the Dutch have lived with for centuries. Their system of dams and dikes, locks and levees is keeping the Netherlands safe in a world with rising seas. Miles O'Brien reports on what Americans can learn from the Dutch model of flood management.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Rep. Sensenbrenner: President 'ought to draw a line' for NSA
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers are calling for an end to most of the NSA's phone and email surveillance. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., says he believes the president "ought to draw a line" that NSA shouldn't cross. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why he believes there should be reform of the scope of U.S. spying programs.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Congress grills Medicare head on health care site problems
    Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner faced questions on Capitol Hill about the rocky rollout of HealthCare.gov and the administration's proposed timeline for fixes. Kwame Holman reports. Jonathan Gruber of MIT and industry consultant Robert Laszewski join Gwen Ifill for more on Americans whose insurance policies are being canceled.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Will Beach Nourishment Save Coney Island?
    Coney Island reopened after Hurricane Sandy wiped out the beach amusement park. Its new roller coaster Cyclone towers over a beach nourishment project, where dredges pull up sand from the ocean floor and pump it back onto the shore. This has been a Coney Island tradition since the 1920s, but is it enough to save the beach?
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • New York Plans for Resilience
    The storm surge from Hurricane Sandy wiped out power and businesses in New York, some of which took weeks to come back online. Now power and telephone companies have bounced back and are taking precautions for the next big storm.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Dutch Homeowners Move to Make Room for the River
    The Dutch have dealt with flooding for centuries by heightening dykes -- and that may not have been wise. Hans Brouwer, senior branch manager with the "Room for the River" project says it's time to the give land back to the river. This means farmers and homeowners have been asked to give up their land to make room for the rivers' natural floodplains, which has not been easy.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • The Sand Engine Churns to Bring Sand to the Beach
    As beaches around the world rapidly erode, Marcel Stive of the Delft University of Technology says we need to nourish the coasts by putting sand back on the shore. These beaches are vital to coastal cities, holding back the ocean during storms, he said. He has developed the Sand Engine, a means of restoring sand to the beach with minimal environmental impact.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Blue Mussels Clean and Protect New York Harbor
    After the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy, New York City looks for ways to protect the metropolis from future floods. Civil engineers look to floodgates, but landscape architect Kate Orff is looking at tiny blue mussels for answers. Rebuilding the natural mussel beds and marshes around the city offers natural protection against waves, and they will clean the harbor's dirty waters, she said.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy and How to Cope
    Klaus Jacob, a special research scientist with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, explains how climate change will turn events like Hurricane Sandy into more frequent and more disastrous events."One weather event like Sandy does not make climate change. But it is a symptom with many other events that will show yes there is something going [on] and we call it climate change," Jacob said.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Windmills Continue to Transform the Dutch Landscape
    The Netherland's iconic windmills are now relics, but they were once the height of flood control technology. These quaint windmills transformed the low-lying region from a bog into a habitable place.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
  • Playing Judo with Nature
    Scientists in the Netherlands are turning to "eco-engineering", using natural barriers to hold back rising tides and flood waters. Mindert De Vries explains how they are playing "judo with nature", creating a balance with nature instead of fighting it with brute strength.
    Original Air Date: October 29, 2013
    October 29, 2013

Monday, October 28, 2013

  • 'Underground' artist Lou Reed inspired tomorrow's rockers
    As founder of The Velvet Underground, musician and songwriter Lou Reed sang of sexual adventurism and illicit drug use, launched a new genre of rock 'n' roll and left a lasting influence for bands to come. Jeffrey Brown talks to Anthony DeCurtis of Rolling Stone magazine about Reed's legacy and literary influences.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • 'Days of Fire' unveils complicated Bush-Cheney partnership
    Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times, says Dick Cheney was arguably the most influential vice president, but that his relationship with President George W. Bush was quite complicated and unique. Baker joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his new book, "Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House."
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • Penn State settles with abuse victims for $59.7 million
    Penn State has struck a nearly $60 million settlement with 26 young men over alleged abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. Gwen Ifill talks to Charlie Thompson of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa., for more on how this settlement compares to similar cases and what factors led to the premium payout.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • Mich. Gov. Snyder: Detroit bankruptcy was last resort
    Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder took the stand in bankruptcy court to testify about the decision-making process the city went through before filing in order to prove that Detroit is insolvent. Jeffrey Brown gets an update on the city's struggle to right its teetering finances from Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • New York uses Sandy lessons to build storm defenses
    One year after Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast, the Big Apple is still rebuilding. But city officials have taken lessons learned from the storm's surge into account to ensure power and transit systems can withstand future natural disasters. Miles O'Brien reports on high-tech infrastructure adjustments in New York City.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • Uproar raises question of what spying is acceptable
    European governments lodged new complaints about U.S. surveillance after learning of new disclosures that the NSA tracked millions of phone calls in Spain, reports Kwame Holman. For more on the continuing fallout, Gwen Ifill speaks with former CIA official John McLaughlin and Charles Kupchan of the Council on Foreign Relations.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013
  • New York City Prepares for Future Hurricanes
    Miles O'Brien reports for NOVA on New York City's recovery from Hurricane Sandy and how the city is preparing for rising storm surges, protecting its tunnels, electric grid and telephone wires.
    Original Air Date: October 28, 2013

Sunday, October 27, 2013

  • Saudi women drivers face uncertain future
    Women fighting for the right to drive in Saudi Arabia are working to sort through multiple reports about women arrested or stopped for driving before taking their next step. Hala Al Dosari, a women's rights activist in the Saudi coastal city of Jeddah said she has seen pictures and video from more than 50 women participating in a movement defying the country's de facto ban on driving on Oct. 26.
    Original Air Date: October 27, 2013
  • Post report finds fraud, embezzlement at non-profits
    A startling report in today's Washington Post shows more than 1,000 of the nation's nonprofit organizations have each acknowledged losses of a quarter million dollars or more because of theft, investment fraud, embezzlement or other unauthorized use of funds. Joe Stephens, an investigative reporter for the Post and the co-author of the piece joins NewsHour from Washington D.C.
    Original Air Date: October 27, 2013
  • What are the chances for immigration reform in 2013?
    Just how significant is the announcement out of California that a Republican congressman will co-sponsor legislation providing a pathway to citizenship for millions of undocumented people living in the country? Alan Gomez, who reports on immigration issues for USA Today, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more.
    Original Air Date: October 27, 2013
  • The SEC, general solicitation and the pickle man
    For the first time in decades, private companies and business owners will be allowed to take out public advertisements to attract potential investors. But not everything about this new provision is as simple as it sounds. We spoke with Rick Field, founder of pickle company Rick's Picks about what the new rules about general solicitation mean to him and how he's using them to grow his business.
    Original Air Date: October 27, 2013
  • Raising start-up cash in the 21st century
    Karla Murthy reports on new potential uses of 'crowdfunding' - raising a large pool of money from many small contributions online. Thanks to the bipartisan JOBS Act entrepreneurs will soon be able to use this method to raise investment capital. Supporters think the provision could be a key to spurring more entrepreneurship, economic growth, and job creation. But is it a good idea for investors?
    Original Air Date: October 27, 2013

Saturday, October 26, 2013

  • What does piracy off Nigeria mean for global business?
    Hari Sreenivasan speaks with maritime risk consultant Michael Frodl about the recent capture of two Americans off of the coast of Nigeria by armed pirates, and what economic and political implications a rescue could entail.
    Original Air Date: October 26, 2013
  • Saudi women take to the road
    Women in Saudi Arabia stood up to authorities Saturday by breaking a ban on driving. The rule stems from conservative religious customs and isn't written in law -- but that hasn't stopped police from arresting women who get behind the wheel.
    Original Air Date: October 26, 2013
  • Secret weapon against hacking -- college students
    On Saturday NewsHour Weekend goes inside the high-tech criminal mind. It's no secret that cybercriminals are stealing personal information and credit card numbers by hacking into corporate and government computers. One school in Pittsburgh is training the next generation of cybersecurity experts to fight off the bad guys -- by teaching them to think the same way.
    Original Air Date: October 26, 2013
  • Paradise found: Hawaiian agriculture from sugar to seeds
    Hawaii's climate allows for multiple crop yields each year. Get a brief overview of Hawaiian industrial agricultural history from the cane fields of the 19th century to today's international seed business.
    Original Air Date: October 26, 2013

Friday, October 25, 2013

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