Wednesday, May 14, 2014

  • Midterm races showcase widening political divide
    Tuesday’s election results in Nebraska and West Virginia highlight a growing polarization between the political parties. Political editor Domenico Montanaro joins Judy Woodruff to provide insight and examine a Brookings Institution study showing the roots of political division in the United States.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    polarization
  • Why more seniors are retiring on college campuses
    Retirement communities with ties to universities are a growing trend. Catering to the college-educated baby-boomer generation, nearly 100 schools have revived relationships with former students and others. Special correspondent Spencer Michels talks to residents of one such community in Florida.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    seniorscollege
  • Clinton on addressing inequality, foreign policy challenges
    Former President Bill Clinton sat down with Gwen Ifill in Washington to discuss growing inequality, how Democrats should talk about the Affordable Care Act, the controversy around the Benghazi attack, Putin’s motives in Ukraine and Hillary Clinton’s potential presidential candidacy for 2016. Their conversation was hosted as part of a fiscal summit run by the Peterson Foundation.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Former President Bill Clinton sat down for an hour-long conversation with Gwen Ifill Wednesday at the Peter G. Peterson Foundation's fifth annual fiscal summit. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images
  • Clinton discusses inequality, foreign policy and politics
    Former President Bill Clinton discussed debt, deficit, economic growth and inequality Wednesday with Gwen Ifill. The discussion was part of the 2014 Fiscal Summit sponsored by the Peterson Foundation in Washington, D.C.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Bill_Clinton
  • Clinton gives advice to Democrats facing criticism on ACA
    Former President Bill Clinton discussed debt, deficit, economic growth and inequality Wednesday with Gwen Ifill. The discussion was part of the 2014 Fiscal Summit sponsored by the Peterson Foundation in Washington, D.C.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    clintondems
  • Bill responds to accusation that Hillary has brain damage
    Former President Bill Clinton discussed debt, deficit, economic growth and inequality Wednesday with Gwen Ifill, part of the 2014 Fiscal Summit sponsored by the Peterson Foundation in Washington, D.C. According to the New York Post, Republican strategist Karl Rove recently suggested that the former Secretary of State may have sustained brain damage after she suffered a fall in December 2012.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Bill Clinton
  • Dinaw Mengestu on his new novel 'All Our Names'
    Dinaw Mengestu talks about his new novel "All Our Names," which narrates the story of a young black man in post-colonial war in Africa and a young white woman who meets and falls in love with that man in a small Midwestern American town.For more Art Beat: newshour.pbs.org/art
    Original Air Date: May 23, 2014
    Dinaw Mengetsu's "All Our Names"
  • Capturing the Viet Cong during a Vietnam War reenactment
    Viet Cong soldiers are captured during a Vietnam War reenactment in the documentary "In Country," by award-winning filmmakers Mike Attie and Meghan O’Hara.
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Courtesy Mike Attie and Meghan O'hara
  • Adapting to life after war in 'In Country'
    Staff Sgt. Lucien "Doc" Darensburg, a two-tour Army Combat Medic, speaks about his experience adapting to life after returning from war in the new documentary "In Country."
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Courtesy Mike Attie and Meghan O'Hara
  • American Vietnam Vet on re-enacting the war in 'In Country'
    American Vietnam Vet Bummy tells of his experience re-enacting the war in the new documentary "In Country."
    Original Air Date: May 14, 2014
    Courtesy Mike Attie and Meghan O'Hara

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

  • Does decades-long fuel leak threaten Albuquerque’s water?
    At Kirtland Air Force Base on the outskirts of Albuquerque, New Mexico, a hole in a pipeline allowed fuel containing toxic chemicals to ooze into the soil, undetected for more than four decades. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports on the efforts to clean up the leak, and the serious concerns that remain about drinking water contamination.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    jetfuel_09
  • Obama honors Sgt. Kyle White, soldier who stood by his team
    At the White House, former Army Sgt. Kyle White was awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest honor for valor. President Obama recalled White’s bravery in a 2007 incident in Afghanistan when his platoon came under surprise attack. White sprinted through enemy fire to take care of a teammate with a shattered arm, and ensured his safe lift out by helicopter.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    President Obama Awards The Medal Of Honor To Army Sergeant Kyle White
  • Former NSA director defends tools of preventing terrorism
    Revelations about the surveillance programs operated by the NSA have made Americans wonder how much of their lives is being monitored by the government. Judy Woodruff sits down with retired Gen. Keith Alexander, former director of the National Security Agency, to discuss the impact of the Snowden leaks, what President Obama knew about spying programs and how to balance privacy with security.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    screen grab
  • Debating Piketty’s theories on ‘Capital’ and inequality
    In "Capital," French economist Thomas Piketty explores how wealth and the income derived from it magnifies the problems of inequality. Gwen Ifill gets debate on his data and conclusions from Heather Boushey of Washington Center for Equitable Growth and Kevin Hassett of American Enterprise Institute.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    screen grab of economist Thomas Piketty's equation
  • U.S. sends plane to scan for Nigeria’s abducted girls
    Nigeria's government confirmed that a "window of negotiation" is open to Boko Haram with respect to the return of hundreds of teenage girls kidnapped from a school in a remote village. Meanwhile the U.S. began manned surveillance flights over the region and authorities tried to piece together how the attack and abduction was carried out. Gwen Ifill has an update.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    nigeria2
  • NewsHour asks: why do you choose basic research?
    We asked students and post-doctoral researchers to tell us why they choose to do basic research. This is a sample of the responses we received.
    Original Air Date: May 13, 2014
    Sarah Haddad working in her neuroscience lab at Brandeis University.

Monday, May 12, 2014

  • French economist Piketty takes on inequality in ‘Capital’
    On a recent U.S. press tour for his bestselling book "Capital," French economist Thomas Piketty spoke to standing-room-only crowds about his examination of growing, global economic inequality. Economics correspondent Paul Solman interviews Piketty for his take on why inequality of wealth has reverted to a lofty level last seen in 19th century Europe.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2014
  • Preserving the LA story, one block at a time
    The city of Los Angeles is constantly reinventing itself. But now, a project called “Survey L.A.” is digging beneath the city’s layers to identify, catalogue and preserve its diverse cultural history in electronic form. Jeffrey Brown reports on this effort to map the history of a relatively new and rapidly developing city.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2014
    LA_culture2
  • Will Eastern Ukraine vote in the presidential election?
    Separatists in Eastern Ukraine declared they are ready to join Russia in Sunday’s secession referendum, but no government has yet recognized the move. Gwen Ifill talks to Steven Pifer of the Brookings Institution and Nadia Diuk of the National Endowment for Democracy for analysis on how it affects Ukraine’s attempts at rebuilding its government and whether there is any chance for negotiation.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2014
    Eastern Ukraine's Independence Referendum
  • Will Nigeria’s government acknowledge Boko Haram?
    Judy Woodruff talks to J. Peter Pham of the Atlantic Council about the strategy and leverage behind Boko Haram’s release of a video reportedly showing some of the missing Nigerian schoolgirls, the Nigerian government’s political agenda and the likelihood of finding the girls.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2014
    nigeria2
  • 'The Cynja' teaches kids about cybersecurity
    Comic book, "The Cynja", aims to introduce youth to the world of cybersecurity and what they can do to protect their own computers. The PBS NewsHour's Hari Sreenivasan spoke to co-authors Chase Cunningham and Heather Dahl about the book on May 9, 2014.
    Original Air Date: May 12, 2014
    The Cynja

Sunday, May 11, 2014

  • Voters in Eastern Ukraine cast ballots in referendum
    Early indications are that voters in Eastern Ukraine have overwhelmingly approved a measure that could potentially lead to their secession from the country. For the latest, Philip Shishkin of the Wall Street Journal joins Hari Sreenivasan from Donetsk via Skype.
    Original Air Date: May 11, 2014
    donetsk
  • Bannister recalls the day he conquered the four-minute mile
    Just over sixty years ago this week 25-year-old British runner Roger Bannister did what many athletes, and even doctors, had deemed impossible. He broke the four-minute mile. Bannister reflects on the barrier he somehow knew was psychological not physical.
    Original Air Date: May 11, 2014
    Athletics Oxfordshire, England. 6th May, 1954. Roger Bannister breaks the tape as he crosses the winning line to complete the historic four minute mile record.
  • Oil brings boom times and safety concerns to North Dakota
    In North Dakota an oil boom has transformed the state's economy. Nearly a million barrels of crude come out of the ground each day in the state, and instead of traveling by pipeline, most North Dakota oil goes by rail. But as the industry is projected to grow, a series of catastrophic - and at times deadly - accidents has brought new scrutiny to the practice of hauling oil by rail.
    Original Air Date: May 11, 2014
    ndoil7

Saturday, May 10, 2014

  • Kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls face serious risks
    The Nigerian schoolgirls abducted by the extremist group Boko Haram face serious risks including malaria-carrying mosquitoes, unsafe drinking water and poisonous snakes. That’s according to Michelle Faul of the Associated Press, who spoke with Hari Sreenivasan from Lagos, Nigeria about the ongoing situation.
    Original Air Date: May 10, 2014
    nigeriamap

Friday, May 9, 2014

  • Facing change, California’s governor embraces continuity
    Times have changed, and so has California Gov. Jerry Brown. Embarking on an unprecedented fourth term, 40 years after he first won office, Brown touts the values of balance, budgeting and planning in order to manage all of that change. John Myers of KQED interviews the veteran politician about his strategy for leading his state.
    Original Air Date: May 9, 2014
    jerrybrown
  • Shields and Brooks on primary points for mainstream GOP
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the week’s news, including the outcomes for Republicans in the first three midterm primaries, why the House GOP are pushing a Benghazi inquiry, the latest national assessment on climate change and NBA MVP Kevin Durant’s tribute to his mom and supporters.
    Original Air Date: May 9, 2014
    shieldsbrooks
  • Using photography to peel back the image of power
    Artist Carrie Mae Weems has used photography to explore national and personal history, using herself and her family as stand-ins to explore common narratives, and using the medium as a tool to challenge stereotypes. Chief arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown talks to the renowned artist about her career as a visual storyteller.
    Original Air Date: May 9, 2014
    carriemaeweems

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