Wednesday, March 11, 2015

  • Watch music videos created by Cricket World Cup contenders
    In our NewsHour Shares videos of the day, some countries taking part in the Cricket World Cup created their own theme songs for the tournament, complete with Bollywood-style videos.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    cricketmusic_nhshares
  • The blurred line between creative risk and musical rip-off
    The song “Blurred Lines” was one of the biggest hits of 2013, but a jury has decided that some of that success is thanks to Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give it Up.” Gaye’s children were awarded $7.3 million after they sued the songwriters for liberally lifting from the 1977 song. Gwen Ifill talks to Kory Grow of Rolling Stone about how the decision could affect the music industry.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    blurredlines
  • News Wrap: Military investigates Florida helicopter crash
    In our news wrap Wednesday, seven marines and four national guard crewmen were presumed dead after a military helicopter crashed during a night training mission in Florida. Also, the police chief of Ferguson, Missouri, resigned in the wake of mounting pressure to step down after a scathing federal report on that city’s law enforcement.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    newswrap
  • Why some students are refusing to take the Common Core test
    Rebellion is brewing against the Common Core educational standards. Testing for the new standards began in March, and some students have refused to take part. Special correspondent for education John Merrow reports from New Jersey, where he talks to Common Core critics and supporters.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    optingout
  • How can colleges combat racism on campus?
    The University of Oklahoma acted quickly to close down a fraternity that got caught using racial epithets in a video. OU President David Boren joins Judy Woodruff to discuss concerns about racism on campus and how colleges should respond.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    boren
  • Winter weather adds stress for Boston's struggling workers
    In Boston, brutal winter weather shuttered schools, offices and businesses for days at a time. While some may have welcomed the snow days, some hourly workers faced the choice between giving up a day of wages or making the grueling, even dangerous, commute. Special correspondent Rick Karr reports.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    Worker cuts a path through the large snow mounds with a snowblower on Beacon Street during a winter blizzard in Boston
  • Racist video prompts protest, apologies and expulsions at OU
    At the University of Oklahoma, a 10-second video showing fraternity members singing a racist chant triggered outrage and protests, leading the university to close its chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and expel two students. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: March 11, 2015
    oufrat

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 10, 2015
    Tonight on the program, we look at Hillary Clinton's news conference where she addressed details surrounding her controversial use of private email as secretary of state. Also: The widening political rift caused by Iran, a new documentary sheds light on the violence, shame and injustice that Indian women often face, andr eviving Timbuktu by preserving its priceless manuscripts.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a news conference at the United Nations in New York
  • Why did India ban a documentary on a deadly gang rape?
    The 2012 deadly gang rape of a 23-year-old medical student in Delhi sparked outrage around the world and led to unprecedented protests. A new documentary, “India’s Daughter,” sheds light on the violence, shame and injustice that Indian women often face. Jeffrey Brown interviews Leslee Udwin, the film’s director, about why the case galvanized so much support and why India has banned the film.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    bannedinindia_poster
  • Why did senators go around the president on Iran?
    What prompted 47 Republican senators to send a letter to the leaders of Iran voicing concern about a potential nuclear deal made without congressional approval? Judy Woodruff gets two views on the GOP showdown with the White House from Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Ct.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    Ayotte, Barrasso, McConnell, Thune and Cornyn hold a news conference after the weekly party caucus policy luncheons at the U.S. Capitol in Washington
  • News Wrap: Two Okla. students expelled for racist chant
    In our news wrap Tuesday, the University of Oklahoma expelled two students for leading a racist chant at a fraternity event. The president of the school has said others may face discipline as well. Also, President Obama laid out a series of changes to the student loan system, calling for better treatment of Americans burdened with student debt and more transparency from lenders.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    newswrap
  • McConnell defends Senate GOP's 'Dear Tehran' letter
    A letter sent to Iran’s leaders by Senate Republicans, signed by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and 46 others, has widened the rift between the GOP and White House over the nuclear talks. Vice President Joe Biden denounced the letter, and Iran’s foreign minister charged that it was part of a campaign to undermine negotiations. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    iranletter
  • Do questions about Clinton’s email hurt trust for 2016?
    Hillary Clinton held a news conference to address concerns about her use of a personal email account and private Internet server during her tenure as secretary of state, saying her decision was a matter of convenience and didn’t break any rules. Judy Woodruff gets reaction from Hilary Rosen, a Democratic strategist, and Matthew Dowd, a Republican strategist.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a press conference at the United Nations in New York
  • Fashioning the perfect family photo...with mannequins
    Photographer Suzanne Heintz captures the hallmark moments of her fictional, mannequin family, including vacations, breakfasts, and even steamy shower scenes.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    Rocky Mountain PBS Suzanne Heintz
  • Reviving Timbuktu by preserving its priceless manuscripts
    For centuries Timbuktu was a center of learning, home to a university and a vast collection of manuscripts containing priceless written records of Islamic and African history. When, a few years ago, jihadists invaded the city and set about to destroy its cultural treasures, one man organized a mission to smuggle out most of the manuscripts. Jeffrey Brown reports from Mali.
    Original Air Date: March 10, 2015
    mali1-1

Monday, March 9, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 9, 2015
    Tonight on the program, we examine how new rules could protect you from errors on your credit report. Also: what challenges remain in Selma 50 years later, finding hope in President Obama's Selma speech, bringing Mali's music back from exile, whether global gender equality is achievable by 2030, and the Iditarod imports snow for the race's slushy start.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    477981449
  • What challenges remain for Selma 50 years since march?
    Over the weekend, visitors like President Obama and nearly 100 members of Congress flocked to Selma, Alabama, to celebrate the anniversary of a civil rights milestone. But 50 years since protesters defiantly crossed the city's iconic Edmund Pettus bridge, Selma remains a deeply divided city with many challenges. Gwen Ifill reports.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    Obama participates in a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama
  • How new rules could protect you from credit errors
    In the past, the way credit rating agencies reviewed disputes or errors frequently hurt consumers. The nation’s three largest credit rating agencies have negotiated with the state of New York to change their review process, and to wait longer before posting unpaid medical debts. Judy Woodruff learns more from New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    cleancredit
  • Finding hope and reality in Obama's speech at Selma
    Gwen Ifill talks to Nia-Malika Henderson of The Washington Post and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report about President Obama’s speech at the 50th anniversary of the bloody protest at Selma, Alabama, and how the 2016 presidential race could be impacted by the controversy over Hillary Clinton’s personal email use.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    Obama delivers remarks at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama
  • News Wrap: GOP senators write open letter to Iran
    In our news wrap Monday, 47 Republican senators issued an open letter to Iran’s leaders saying they would consider any agreement not approved by Congress as an executive agreement between Obama and Ayatollah Khamenei that could be revoked or modified. Also, the U.S. government issued new sanctions on seven officials from Venezuela, accusing them of corruption and human rights violations.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    GOP letter iran | News Wrap
  • Bringing Mali’s music back from exile
    Mali is a country renowned for its music, but in 2012, the music stopped. That year, separatist rebels and Islamic groups seized two-thirds of the country and banned any expression of art. While French and Malian forces drove the Islamists out, much of the north remains unsafe. Jeffrey Brown reports from Bamako and Timbuktu on efforts to restore their rich culture.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    malimusic2
  • Iditarod imports snow for race’s slushy start
    In our NewsHour Shares video of the day, high temperatures meant there wasn’t enough snow on the ground at start of the annual thousand-mile Iditarod sled dog race across Alaska. Snow was brought in just for the weekend’s opening festivities.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    iditarod
  • Can we achieve global gender equality by 2030?
    Twenty years since the UN announced a major effort to reduce global gender inequality, women and girls today are far from getting equal treatment and participation in society, while violence against females is commonplace. Lakshmi Puri of UN Women joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the findings of a pair of reports looking at the status of women and girls, plus opportunity for further progress.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2015
    womenandgirls

Sunday, March 8, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full program March 8, 2015
    On this edition for Sunday, March 8, 2015, the latest from Baghdad as Iraqi forces launch an offensive against the Islamic State, why the director of the CIA plans to restructure the agency, and in our signature segment, the increasingly tense climate for Muslim in France's most diverse city. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2015
    fullep
  • Behind the rift between Iraq and US coalition in ISIS fight
    Iraqi forces have made significant headway against the Islamic State this past week, but Iranian troops have joined Iraq's ground offensive, and that's causing a serious rift between Iraq and the U.S.-led coalition. Anne Barnard, who has reported for the New York Times on the fighting and the rising political tension, joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from Baghdad.
    Original Air Date: March 8, 2015
    Members of the Iraqi security forces listen to instructions in Al Hadidiya, south of Tikrit, en route to the Islamic State-controlled al-Alam town
  • How will CIA reform help it meet 21st century challenges?
    The director of the CIA is ordering sweeping reforms designed to dramatically change the agency starting at the top. Associated Press reporter Ken Dilanian joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss what is changing and why.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2015
    The lobby of the CIA Headquarters Building in McLean, Virginia, August 14, 2008. CIA Director John Brennan announced a sweeping reorganization of the spy agency Friday. Photo by Larry Downing/Reuters

Saturday, March 7, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full program March 7, 2015
    On this edition for Saturday, March 7, 2015, 50 years after civil rights marches in Selma, Ala., a look at the ongoing battle over voters rights, an expert weighs in on what's behind the CIA's restructuring, and in our signature segment, a look at the right-to-die movement in Oregon, the first state to legalize assisted suicide nearly 20 years ago. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2015
    nhcabs
  • Military advances in Nigeria, Boko Haram ramps up bombings
    As many as five separate bomb blasts reportedly killed at least 54 people and wounded 143 others in Northeastern Nigeria on Saturday. Suicide bombers targeted a couple of crowded markets and a busy bus station. Michelle Faul, the Associated Press Nigerian bureau chief, joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from Nigeria with more.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2015
    NigeriaBombing

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