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Burning Questions  

Can lobbyists affect the outcome of an election?
It's no secret that lobbyists from companies, labor unions, and other organizations spend money to influence candidates, campaigns, and the political process. Lobbyists can also work on political campaigns and political action committees as well as make political donations under the same guidelines as other Americans. While some presidential candidates choose to decline money from lobbyists, so far in the 2008 election, the number of registered lobbyists raising money for presidential candidates is already nearing the total for the entire 2004 campaign.

While most candidates declare their voting independence from financial backers, many politicians have been caught taking money in exchange for favorable treatment toward the contributor. So far in the 2008 election season, John McCain and Hillary Clinton are the top recipients of lobbying contributions.

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EXTERNAL LINKS

Center for Responsive Politics Lobbying Database

Public Citizen: White House for Sale






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