NOW Home Page
Home
Politics & Economy
Science & Health
Arts & Culture
Society & Community
Discussion
TV Schedule
Newsletter
For Educators
Archive
Topic Index
Search:

5.5.06
Politics and Economy:
Facts & Figures: On Health Insurance
More on This Story:
6 Million
The rise in the number of people without health insurance in the United States since 2000. This has been driven in part by declines in employer-sponsored coverage.

Over 45 million
The number of people without health insurance in the United States.

16 million
The number of Americans that are "underinsured" because they have high out-of-pocket expenses relative to their incomes.

27 million
The number of small business workers and their families that have no health insurance.

8 million
Estimated number of children who are living without health insurance.

59 percent
The percentage of the workforce that is expected to be covered by health insurance in 2010. This represents a drop from 67 percent in 2000.

41 percent
Percent of small businesses (3-199 workers) that did not offer health benefits to their employees in 2005.

$260 billion
The estimated cost in lost productivity each year due to health problems among working-age Americans and their families.

18,000
The estimated number of excess deaths each year due to a lack of health insurance.

8 in 10
…of uninsured people came from working families in 2004, almost 70 percent came from families with one or more full-time workers.

51 percent
… of Americans insured through employer-sponsored health plans are covered by their own employer and some 49 percent are covered as a worker's dependent.

37 percent
The uninsured rate in the agricultural industry, the highest in any industry.

5 percent
The uninsured rate in the public administration industry, the lowest in any industry.

Over 80 percent
… of uninsured workers are in blue collar jobs.

(sources: Institute of Medicine, The Kaiser Commission, The Commonwealth Fund, UC Berkeley)




Related Stories:

about feedback pledge © Public Affairs Television. All rights reserved.
go to the full archive