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Politics and Economy:
Exploring Foreign Opinion on the Web
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The press around the world is weighing in on Hurricane Katrina. Sample some of the coverage at the BBC's monitoring site, and explore more below.

It has become commonplace to warn Web surfers not to trust everything they read on the Internet. Indeed, it is always wise, no matter what medium, to consider the source. However, the Internet offers an unprecedented opportunity to find out what the rest of the world is thinking about, and what they're reading about the United States.

Getting Started

There are literally tens of thousands of international news sites on the Web. There are newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations, press agencies and national news agencies. Where to start? Do you want to see what is breaking news in Tunisia? Or do you want to read the analysis of politics from the famed French paper LE MONDE? Use one of the collections of media links below, all of which arrange links by location and type of news source:

BBC World Profiles

If you need more guidance we suggest a visit to the BBC. The BBC's own international news site, the BBC World Service, provide online streaming and text news in 43 languages. But the BBC also helps interested surfers gather world news from thousands of other news sources.

The BBC News Country Profiles database provides a valuable primer on every nation in the world. (The CIA World Factbook provides government and statistical information and maps for further reference.) The profiles are accompanied by a list (and links) to many of each country's major media outlets: newspapers, radio, television and state press agencies. Media profiles also often note ownership, publication frequency and political allegiance of outlets. Country profiles also often list an estimated number of internet users — to help you gauge how many like-minded surfers may be reading today's USA Today online.

Tracking World Events

Clearly, much of the world's news is broadcast in languages other than English — although more and more often Web sites are offering limited English-language versions of their news coverage. The BBC also provides a useful service in their free Media Report — a daily English-language look at what is in the international news. These reports, which contain direct quotations from foreign media and BBC analysis, are compiled by the BBC World Monitoring Service. The Service monitors press coverage worldwide and offers full translations to subscribers. In addition to the Media Reports, the World Monitoring Service also posts a selection of original articles from around the world on its Web site each day in English.

There is one more service provided by the BBC to Internet newshounds — The Week Ahead. This feature lists important upcoming political and economic events from around the world.

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