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Week of 10.23.09

Slideshow: Coastal Crisis

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1 After Cylcone Aila hit in June 2009, the island of Gabura was completely flooded, displacing 20,000 people from their homes. (photo: Amy Bucher)

2 Most of Gabura is now submerged by the flood waters of Cyclone Aila. (photo: Amy Bucher)

3 Refugees from Cylone Aila are now living in tents on top of the man-made embankment that was supposed to protect their island. (photo: Amy Bucher)

4 Salt water from the storm surge of the cyclone contaminated all the wells on Gabura. These girls make three trips a day to bring fresh water to their families. (photo: Amy Bucher)

5 If sea levels rise one meter, Bangladesh stands to lose 20% of its land mass, and 35 million people will have to move. (photo: Amy Bucher)

6 Climate refugees like this woman, who lost her home in a flood, are now pouring into the slums of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. (photo: Amy Bucher)

7 The discovery of flood-resistant rice that can survive for weeks underwater provides new hope for the people of Bangladesh. (photo: Amy Bucher)

8 Some 150 million people in Bangladesh depend on rice to survive. Flooding from climate change threatens to destroy the country's food supply. (photo: Amy Bucher)

9 Bangladesh is a true water world. With most of the country less than ten meters above sea level, scientists consider Bangladesh at high risk from the dangerous impacts of climate change. (photo: Amy Bucher)

10 Divided by numerous rivers and canals, Dhaka is vulnerable to flooding. (photo: Larry Engel)

11 Children in class on board a floating school created by architect Mohammed Rezwan. (photo: Larry Engel)

12 Floating schools are paving the way for floating communities in Bangladesh - one answer to the intense flooding caused by climate change. (photo: Larry Engel)

13 A floating school in the Natore Province of northwest Bangladesh, on the way to pick up students. (photo: Larry Engel)

14 Maria Hinojosa interviews 11-year-old Aysha Khatun, a student at a floating school.

 
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