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This Week
May 10, 2002

This week on NOW: Are we making our children sick? In the last 70 years, more than 75,000 synthetic chemicals and metals have been put to use in America — chemicals that in many cases make our lives easier and better. They kill insects and weeds, clean our clothes and carpets, unclog our drains, create produce and lawns as pretty as a picture. But most of these chemicals have never been tested for their toxic effects on children. And scientists are concerned that recent increases in childhood illnesses like asthma and cancer, as well as learning disabilities, may be related to the environment — to what kids eat, drink and breathe.

Kids and Chemicals, a special edition of NOW, features medical investigators and health officials engaged in the latest research on links between childhood illness and environmental contamination.

In Depth

Dr. Landrigan and child

Use our interactive map to locate environmental and health resources in your community.

Discover the questions you should be asking by reviewing the Environmental Checkist for Your Home and an Environmental Checkist for Your Neighborhood and even a Environmental Checkist for Future Parents

sick child
Get the basic facts on chemical dangers to children and the laws designed to protect them.

Read biographies of the research scientists featured on KIDS AND CHEMICALS


Talk about your kids and the chemicals in their environment on the message boards

Picture of the Week

South African girls
Young girls in Soweto, South Africa — What's their future? Add your caption.


Learn more about the issues discussed on NOW.

Read the complete transcript.


Kids and Chemicals
Producer: Gail Ablow
Co-Producer: Gregory Henry
Editor: Howard Sharp
Associate Producer: Karla Murthy

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