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Voyage of the Odyssey - Galapagos Islands : March 2000 - July 2000

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You will need the Real Player, to watch video or listen to the logs.


July 23, 2000
The R.V. Odyssey readies to embark on the third leg of the voyage, the Pacific crossing.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
The Night Before the Departure - Real Audio
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
July 20, 2000
A Sea Cucumber underwater. The adults of these remarkable creatures serve as ocean filters, helping to purifying the seawater, ensuring the maintenance of a healthy, functioning aquatic ecosystem in the surrounding waters of the Galapagos.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
Sea Cucumbers in Peril - Real Audio
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
July 18, 2000
Children from the Center for Enviromental Education on the island of Santa Cruz learn about conservation and the enviroment through puppet shows.
Watch the related video
Enviromental Education in the Galapagos: Real Audio
Photo: Chris Johnson
July 13, 2000
On the island of North Seymour, two Blue Footed Boobies.
Watch the related video
Blue Footed Boobies : Real Video
Photo: Chris Johnson
July 7, 2000
Geoff Woodhouse, a Dog Trainer at the Charles Darwin Research Station, discusses the Isabela Project.
Listen to the related Odyssey Log-
The Isabela Project : Real Audio
Photo: Chris Johnson
June 29, 2000
The Black sea turtle only nests in the Galapagos Islands and is a sub-species of the green sea turtle.
Listen to the related Odyssey Log-
Sea Turtles of the Galapagos: Part II - Real Video
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
June 28, 2000
A masked booby lands on the shell of a Black sea turtle.
Listen to the related Odyssey Log-
Sea Turtles of the Galapagos: Part I - Real Audio
Photo: Chris Johnson
June 27, 2000
The Yellow-Crowned Night Heron - As their name suggests, these birds are primarily nocturnal hunters feeding on locusts, centipedes and scorpions. Occasionally they will hunt in daylight, particularly favoring the Sally Lightfoot crab.
Listen to the related Odyssey Log-
Exploring Santa Cruz: Real Video
Photo: Chris Johnson
June 23, 2000
Giant Tortoises can weigh up to an astonishing 270kg. With such great size comes longevity. These animals don't reach sexual maturity until 25-30 years of age, and it is believed they can live for as many as 150 years.
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
June 20, 2000
The sperm whale fluke is a moment of great beauty, the massive, flexible tail hanging for an instant as a waterfall spills gently over it as it dives.
Listen to the related Odyssey Log-
Theories of How Sperm Whales Catch Squid: Real Audio
Photo: Chris Johnson
June 19, 2000
Squid have the largest eyes of any animal, with the eye of the giant squid exceeding 15cm in diameter, the size of a dinner plate.
Watch the related Video Log-
Squid - The Prey of Sperm Whales: Real Video
Photo: Chris Johnson
June 16, 2000
The Galapagos Sea Lion is a smaller, endemic subspecies of the Californian Sea Lion. There are approximately 50,000 individuals, well dispersed around the archipelago. They gather in colonies where they can be seen loafing around in piles on the beach or on rocks. These mammals are highly inquisitive and will often accompany snorkelers.
Watch the related Video Log-
Galapagos Sea Lions: Real Video
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
May 6, 2000
The position of the blowhole of a sperm whale is not centered as in other toothed whales. The nostril or blowhole of the sperm whale is positioned on the left hand side of the head as shown above. There is in fact a right nostril which is internal.
Watch the related SCIENCE IN THE FIELD piece by Roger Payne:
The Blowholes of Sperm Whales: 28k - 56k - Cable/DSL
Photo: Chris Johnson
May 3, 2000
Today, the Odyssey passed by some volcanic craters on the south-west coast of Isabela Island.
Listen to the related Voice from the Sea: Geology of the Galapagos.
Photo: Chris Johnson
May 1, 2000
Today, Captain Iain Kerr on the Odyssey "whale-boom", a platform extending 30 feet off of the starboard bow.
Listen to the related Daily Log.
Photo: Dr. Roger Payne
April 29, 2000
2 frigate birds positioning to feed.
Listen to the related Daily Log.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 27, 2000
Captain Iain Kerr returns to the bridge of the Odyssey for the next 10 day leg of scientific study.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 25, 2000
Daniel McBride attends to one last polish of the R.V. Odyssey name board before Dr. Roger Payne and Captian Iain Kerr arrive in Puerto Ayora for the next scientific expedition leg beginning tommorrow.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 23, 2000
While anchored in Puerto Ayora, it was time for Daniel McBride of South Africa, the deckhand of the Odyssey, to scrub the decks as we prepare for the next scientific leg.
Listen to the related Daily Log.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 21, 2000
Today, a view of a sperm whale from the "crow's nest". Its estimated length was over 50 feet.
Listen to the related Daily Log.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 19, 2000
A male Orca displays his tall trademark dorsal fin and distinctive white eye patch.
Listen to the related Daily Log.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 17, 2000
Today, a hammerhead shark circled the Odyssey for over 15 minutes.
View the related special video log on this event:
28K - 56k - T1/Cable
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 15, 2000
Pilot Whales have white to grey saddle patches on their back behind the dorsal fin. These patches vary between animals and populations, and combined with the shape of the dorsal fin, assist in the identification of individuals.
View the related special video log on pilot whales:
28K - 56k - T1/Cable
Photo: Chris Johnson

April 12, 2000
Today we spotted a Red-Footed Booby on the top spreader of mizzen mast of the Odyssey, preying on flying fish.
Listen to the related Daily Log on this extraordinary event
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 10, 2000
Odyssey Chief Scientist, Daniel Palacios, scans the horizon for marine mammals during his line-transect survey.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 9, 2000
Today, the R.V. Odyssey received a visit from a juvenile Red Footed Booby.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 6, 2000
This morning, the R.V. Odyssey was surrounded by an estimated 1600 Common Dolphins.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 4, 2000
An encounter with a Sally lightfoot crab in Puerto Ayora. Their name orginates from their habit of skipping across short stretches of water. The young of this species are black and run even faster then the adults.
Photo: Chris Johnson
April 1, 2000
After two weeks at sea, the final destination has arrived - The Galapagos Islands. The Odyssey is finishing its passage with another day of travel remaining to Puerto Ayora. The Odyssey first encountered Darwin Island, also known Culpepper Island, with its majestic cliffs and wildlife.
Photo: Chris Johnson
March 30, 2000
While cruising 800 miles off the coast of Costa Rica towards the Galapagos Islands today, the Odyssey encountered many Green Sea Turtles.
Photo: Chris Johnson
March 28, 2000
Judith, Brian, Cinde and Lisa. The volunteers from Cape Ann Whale Watch help make the Galapagos leg of the Voyage a reality with all of their hard work.
Photo: Chris Johnson
March 26, 2000
The Voyage to Galapagos begins. As the Odyssey passes 700 miles off of the coast of Guatemala, in the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean, Multimedia Field Producer, Chris Johnson, looks for whales.
Photo: Genevieve Johnson
March 22, 2000
Provisioning in Cabo San Lucas. Alison, the Odyssey Hotel/Cook, scrubs down the fruit for storage.
Photo: Chris Johnson
March 17, 2000
The Odyssey departs San Diego for the Galapagos Islands. The crew of the Odyssey waves goodbye.
 
 
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