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TERRESTRIAL WILDLIFE

When the Odyssey is in port, it gives educators aboard the ship a chance to report on the local wildlife. The following are some of those experiences during the Voyage.


December 11, 2002
'Land of the Lumbering Giants - The Giant Tortoise of Aldabra'
"With legs like an elephant, a long retractable neck and an enormous scaled shell, the lumbering giant tortoise is the undisputed 'King' of Aldabra. But how did they reach such a remote place?"
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August 13, 2002
'Magpie Robin Recovery Program'
"Before humans arrived in the Seychelles 250 years ago, birds like the Magpie Robin were numerous and widespread. Part of the reason was that there were almost no predators that threatened them apart from the odd lizard or gecko that may have destroyed some eggs or even killed a few young chicks. Today, the Seychelles Magpie Robin is one of the world's most endangered species."
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August 16, 2002
'Challenges to Conservation - The Magpie Robin'
"Establishing the critically endangered Magpie Robin population is a remarkable accomplishment considering the fragility of species that are endemic to isolated oceanic islands. As the team from Nature Seychelles and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) learned, the road to recovery is fraught with major challenges and unpredictable setbacks."
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May 9, 2002
'Quokkas'
"The other day, some of the crew made the trip out to Rottnest Island intent on searching for one or Australia's rarest marsupials-a miniature kangaroo most people have never heard of, but which has been well known to the local aboriginal inhabitants for centuries: the Quokka."
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October 8, 2001
'The Australian Pelican'
"One species among many we have observed in Kakadu who take advantage of this unique habitat are large groups of Australian Pelicans. The Australian Pelican is considerably larger than its northern brown cousin and occurs throughout the continent wherever it has easy access to large bodies of both salt and freshwater."
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September 13, 2001
'Australia's Ginger Dog'
"Since the arrival of Europeans, the Dingo, has endured a torrid history that continues today. It has been hailed as both a proud symbol of Australian outback fauna and a much-despised pest by some landowners, who have long believed 'the only good dingo is a dead dingo'."
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September 5, 2001
'The Black Wallaroo'
"Today while visiting one of the many parks here in the 'top end', we were very fortunate to spot a Black Wallaroo. A wallaroo is generally larger than a wallaby and is closer in size to a smaller kangaroo. The distinction between a wallaroo and a kangaroo is predominantly due habitat."
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April 14, 2003
'Pinnewala Elephant Orphanage'
"The elephant is the largest living animal found on land, its size is only exceeded by some large whale species. Before heading back out to sea in search of sperm whales, the crew travelled up into the mountains in the hope of seeing Sri Lankan elephants."
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July 6, 2001
'Tree-Kangaroos'
"There are one hundred and eighty known species of mammals in Papua New Guinea. These include marine as well as terrestrial mammals, such as bats and rats. Also there are approximately sixty species of marsupial mammals, including the Tree-Kangaroo."
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