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Pam

Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical

Posted by Pam on May 13, 2010 at 10:01 AM in Book Events
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When the folks at the Kennedy Center had an idea to do a show based on the award-winning book Knuffle Bunny, Mo Willems didn't hesitate. Okay, maybe he hesitated, but he certainly accepted the challenge to write the script and lyrics of Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical. For over two years he worked with more than thirty people to turn the picture book into a one-hour family musical.

KKTBD_KnuffleBunnyACautionaryMusical_138.jpgWith Grammy Award winning composer Michael Silversher taking on the music, Mo worked most closely on the script with dramaturge Megan Alrutz. As he notes on his blog, "If you ever get the chance to get your own Dramaturge, do it! They're awesome. The thought of losing my Dramaturge to other dramaturgically needy projects in the future fills me with dread. And, as long as you're getting a Dramaturge, get Megan. She rocks." Workshops and rehearsals with the cast and crew helped to further shape the musical with even additional tweaking even on the Friday before the performance. 

The musical certainly feels like a Mo Willems production. Fans will instantly recognize the background projected on the stage and even the clothes the characters are wearing as being from the book. The plot is the same, the father takes his young daughter to the laundromat and misplaces her beloved Knuffle Bunny, causing a toddler meltdown of miscommunication and complete frustration.

For the musical, the part of Trixie is played by Stephanie D'Abruzzo, an old pal from Mo's Sesame Street and Sheep in the Big City days. She dives into the tough role, portraying Trixie's garbled speech and active imagination with a childlike enthusiasm. Michael John Casey gives the audience a fantastic Dad, who is ready to take on anything and make it fun. Erika Rose is the knowing Mom, and Matthew McGloin and Gia Mora handle the other characters as Puppeteers.

The children in the audience laughed during the show, and there is much for adults to appreciate as well. Trixie's inability to communicate creates much of the humor of the book and the musical, and yet it's also a real source of frustration and helplessness for both father and daughter. The musical gave an opportunity to explore this deeper connection to our own feelings of inadequacy as parents. That point when we recognize that our child has ideas and an individually that we can't always comprehend or even recognize.

This theme is evident as the father sings about all the things that he will teach his daughter, while not noticing her already intense fascination with the world around her. In fact as she expresses delight in a friendly pigeon - yes, that pigeon - her father scares the bird away as a "dirty rat with wings." As poor Trixie sings a sad song of toddler gibberish - complete with boa and spotlight - about the loss of her stuffed friend, her father is lost in misunderstanding. And yet as he feels that frustration of not getting it and not doing it right, he still is able to tap into what is most important - the love that he feels for his little girl. Of course, it all turns out fine at the end.

29760_390435789173_15853939173_3841347_5754780_n.jpgOverall, Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical is a fun show for kids and their adults, with catchy music and lots of laughs along with a sentimental spirit. And what struck Mo Willems as a member of the audience? " I loved holding my daughter's hand during the song "Really, Really Love You." Best moment by far."

The show travels for eighteen months or so before returning to Kennedy Center next year, so look to catch a performance at a theater near you. If you're excited about the possibility of another Mo musical, be encouraged that he's talking about ways to work together more with the group, having enjoyed this experience so much. Whatever it is or may be, count me in the audience. Or crashing the premiere party as I may or may not have done this time. Read all about my personal experience at the musical over at MotherReader.

3 Comments

morninglight mama writes...

Yes, and the music is simply so fun, and we've been making up our own Life is Trixie with songs... if we can't remember the original lyrics, we're certainly having fun making up our own. :)

Joy writes...

Hats off to the Kennedy Center for providing quality entertainment that families and small children can enjoy!

Since science tells us that children learn from what they see and hear modeled around them by the adult world, first from their mothers (and fathers), then from other adult sources, it is a delight for me to hear the types of excellent vocal skills that are being modeled in this show.

There is a great deal of information about the importance of this vocal modeling on language development, so it encourages me to know that the Kennedy Center has put money, time and tremendous heart into making Knuffle Bunny such a huge success.

Perhaps without realizing it, they have provided entertainment that gives small children (and adults) exposure to excellent vocal skills, and this type of vocal example is directly linked to the quality of language development in the children.

It would do our world good if more children could have the opportunity to see this show and if more parents and teachers could become aware of how crucial this type of vocal role modeling is for the future of our children's communication skills.

Bravo to the Kennedy Center, Mo Willems,
Michael Silversher, the cast, director, costume, set and lighting designers, and every member of the tech team, administrative team and donors that made this production available to the public.

Give us more please!

Many thanks,
Joy Sikorski

Oleg writes...
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