Support for PBS Parents provided by:


  • Cat in the Hat
  • Curious George
  • Daniel Tiger
  • Dinosaur Train
  • Peg + Cat
  • Sid the Science Kid
  • Super Why!
  • Wild Kratts
  • Martha Speaks
  • The Electric Company
  • WordGirl
  • Thomas & Friends
  • Cyberchase
  • Arthur
  • Sesame Street
  • Between the Lions
  • Mama Mirabelle
  • Caillou
  • Chuck Vanderchuck
  • Oh Noah
  • Fetch!
  • Fizzy's Lunch Lab
  • Maya & Miguel
  • Mister Rogers
  • Postcards from Buster
  • Clifford
  • SciGirls
  • Wilson & Ditch
  • WordWorld
  • DragonFly TV
  • ZOOM
 

Books

Home »

Posts in Recommendations Category

Pam

Thursday THIRTY: Summer Books, Tot to Tween

Posted by Pam on July 22, 2010 at 3:39 PM in Chapter BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

THIRTY?! Well, if you add the Thirteen Summer Picture Books and Thirteen Summer Chapter Books to today's Four Special Summer Books, you do indeed get thirty books about summer from tot to tween.

The four I am highlighting today have a little more weight to them than the chapter books I showcased last week. (Okay, with the exception of the deeper One Crazy Summer, but I couldn't resist that great title.) These certainly aren't the darker books of Young Adult, but each has it's own serious aspect. And they are also all spectacular books.

Seaglass Summer
by Anjali Banerjee

Seaglass SummerWhen eleven year old Poppy skips a trip with her parents to India, she makes the decision with a goal to be a vet like her Uncle Sanjay. What she finds is that it working with animals can be difficult, gross, and heart-breaking. Over the summer Poppy also adjusts to the slow-pace island lifestyle, makes new friends, and learns more about herself. She even comes to handle the animals in emergencies and in passing. This book is a lovely read, but the sections on animals suffering or dying are emotionally intense - especially if you've been through it personally. The author handles the topic with grace, but be fairly warned.

Free Baseball
by Sue Corbett

Free BaseballFelix knows baseball. As the son of a Cuban superstar, some might say that the eleven year old was born to it. Even if his mom won't talk about his father now. Mistaken for a batboy by a local Cuban team, Felix takes the opportunity to hang out with the ballplayers - and maybe find out something about his dad. Certainly a book that features the game well, but also the complexity of relationships and secrets.

The Liberation of Gabriel King
by K. L. Going

The Liberation of Gabriel KingGabriel King is afraid of everything - spiders, robbers, cows - but his biggest fear is moving up to the next grade, where he'll be in the same school as the bullies who pick on him. His best friend Frita decides to take the summer to liberate Gabriel from his fears one by one. She's rarely afraid, but one of her biggest fears is about to confront the pair head on. Set in the deep south in 1976, this book is a drama, comedy, and historical fiction. It tackles fear, hatred, racism, but ultimately is about courage. And friendship. Wonderful book.

Turtle in Paradise
by Jennifer L. Holm

Turtle in ParadiseTurtle and her mom have always gotten through tough times together, but now that mom is employed as a live-in maid for a woman who doesn't like kids, Turtle is send to live with relatives in Key West. It's the middle of the depression, and many folks don't have much, but Turtle is still surprised by the poverty on this little stretch of land. Almost as surprised as she is by finding all of her long-lost relations. With the sea and the trees to provide, the families get by - even if shoes are a rarity - and there is even some fun to be had in seeking payment of sweets for babysitting. There are also literal treasures to be found, for those crazy, brave and bored enough to seek them. And along with her cousins, Turtle finds herself right in the middle of all of the adventures. Some frightening stuff in a hurricane, and Turtle's family situation give weight to the lighter side. Enjoyable read that exposes a lost place in time.

Links to books in this post are affiliate links for the Amazon Associates program, for which the site MotherReader.com may receive a referral fee.

Terry

The Bookworm Goes on Vacation

Posted by Terry on July 19, 2010 at 10:36 AM in RecommendationsSeriesYoung Adult Bookscreative literacy
Bookmark and Share

It is hard to believe that we are getting ready to slide head-first into August. For many of us, August is synonymous with a week (maybe two) away from home. It might be the beach, the mountains, Grandma's ... a place where the daily routine is different and your days are more relaxed.

Another symbol of vacation is "beach reading," those books you enjoy while you soak up the sun, lay in the hammock, rock on the porch ... you get the picture. If you're looking for alternatives to lugging books - and don't want the eReader to plop in the pond - then you might like these ideas.

Audiobooks ~ Listening to books is great for those of us who are easily bored in the backseat and/or get sick when we read in a moving vehicle.

Most libraries have robust audiobook collections, and some have tools in place for you to download them. You might start with Pam's recommendations from Thursday Thirteen Summer Chapter Books. More than half of them (see slideshow) are available on CD or as downloads.

Sync is an online community that is offering two FREE young adult books each week. They pair a classic from a summer reading list with a modern YA title. Next week, it's Suzanne Collins' wildly popular Hunger Games and Shirley Jackson's classic, The Lottery. Here is the complete Sync: YA Listening schedule.

Music ~ I tend to look at music as poetry set to a rhythm. With music, kids can learn about history, culture, instruments, social skills, vocabulary, just about anything. Albums with music for kids range from CDs with songs written just for them to traditional songs that introduce them to specific genres, and don't forget the music you like!

Periodicals ~ Magazines and comic books are plentiful, quickly read, and easily disposed of when you're finished. Whether you pick some up before you leave home, or you stop in the local drugstore along the way, it is easy to put together some fun reading. These may not be some of your usual choices, but they can feed your kids' passions and keep them reading on vacation.

Technology makes it possible to pack a lot of literacy in tiny little packages, like CDs and digital devices. Whether you are traveling by car, bus, train, plane, or even boat, we hope you find room in the suitcase to take some reading on vacation, too.

Got a recommended vacation read or music? We'd love to add them to the collection.

Note: The bookcovers in the slideshow link to Amazon.com. A Reading Tub affiliate code is embedded in the link. We may earn money for the Children's and Young Adult Bloggers Literary Awards (Cybils) from purchases made through those links.

Pam

Thursday Three Thirteen: Summer Chapter Books

Posted by Pam on July 15, 2010 at 2:01 PM in Chapter BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

Last week I shared thirteen of my favorite Summer Picture Books. Now it's time to grow up a little with thirteen books for the elementary school crowd. This week I listed the books in roughly in order of the target age of the reader, starting with youngest to oldest. That said, many of the books would be great to read aloud to younger readers as I've made up this collection of mostly lighter summer books.

 Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown
by Jarrett Krosoczka
A new addition to younger graphic novels is this series featuring a Lunch Lady with astonishing abilities to fight crime and serve tater tots. With the Breakfast Bunch kids, she tackles a new enemy at summer camp. Silly fun!

Camp Babymouse
by Jennifer Holm and Matthew Holm
The fabulous Babymouse graphic novel series brings us a trip to summer camp that can't help but go wrong. Oh, Babymouse, I love you so. (Also look for Babymouse: Beach Babe).

The Small Adventure of Popeye and Elvis
by Barbara O'Connor
Feeling bored in his small Southern town, Popeye befriends a newcomer named Elvis who finds adventure in everything. A great book for seeing the wonders in the everyday world.

 Moxy Maxwell does not Love Stuart Little Moxy Maxwell does not Love Stuart Little
by Peggy Gifford
Someone has been putting off her summer reading - and continues to find ways to do so in amazingly elaborate ways. The photographs and the clever section titles add to this amusing book. (Also, one of my favorite covers of all time.)

Summer Reading is Killing Me
by Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith
Summer reading doesn't work out well for the Time Warp Trio either as the boys put their booklist in "The Book" and end up caught in a world of good and bad characters from children's literature. Mayhem ensues.

Lowji Disovers America
by Candice Fleming
When Lowji arrives from India, he comes with wishes for new friends and pets. But summer vacation makes it hard find kids in his neighborhood, and his landlady is not fond of animals. No matter, as Lowji's positive attitude and clever solutions get him results in amusing ways.

 Summer According to Humphrey Summer According to Humphrey
by Betty Birney
The little hamster with the big series of adventures gets to go to Camp Happy Hollow where he meets a wild mouse, visits the lake, and helps the kids adjust to the outdoor life and each other. There's always fun to be had with Humphrey.

Minn and Jake's Almost Terrible Summer
by Janet Wong, illustrated by Genevieve Cote
Jake returns to his home for a visit, but didn't expect his camp-free summer to be ruined by his Halmoni's plans and his little brother's annoyances. When his best friend Minn makes a visit, even that causes conflict. Can this summer be saved?

The Lemonade War
by Jacqueline Davis
When Evan finds out that his younger sister Jessie is going to skip a grade right into his class, he channels his anger into a challenge to who can make the most money with competing lemonade stands. An interesting and often amusing story of marketing strategies, sibling rivalry, and making lemonade.

 Any Which Wall Any Which Wall
by Laurel Snyder, illustrated by LeUyen Pham
"Common magic" takes a four kids out of their boring summer doldrums when a magical wall transports them into different worlds of adventures, including a pirate ship and Camelot. Delightful story with a timeless tone.

Lawn Boy (and Lawn Boy Returns)
by Gary Paulsen
A lesson in business and the free-market economy is contained in this story of a boy who starts with a old riding law mower and ends up as a young tycoon. Funny and yet highly educational.

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy

by Jeanne Birdsall
After their father rents a guest house for a few weeks in the summer, four sisters explore the large estate grounds making friends and having adventures along the way. An old-fashioned story with a contemporary feel makes this a perfect summer story.

One  Crazy Summer
One Crazy Summer
by Rita Williams-Garcia
Three sisters from Brooklyn spend a month with their mother in California. Sent out to stay out of mom's way, the girls spent this summer in 1968 among the Black Panthers learning about revolution, identity, and personal responsibility. A deeper book, for certain, but with its own lightness and humor.

Links to books in this post are affiliate links for the Amazon Associates program, for which the site MotherReader.com may receive a referral fee.

Terry

Bookworm Basics: Casting a Magic Spell for Reading

Posted by Terry on July 13, 2010 at 11:30 AM in Early LiteracyLibrariesRecommendationscreative literacy
Bookmark and Share

magic_hat_1.pngIn the coming weeks we'll get back to our lists of book ideas for your home library, but summer is the perfect time to be a reading magician. I believe there is a book for every child, and today we're going to reveal the secret to finding the book that sparks a love of reading for your kids Ready? Think like a children's librarian!

When you ask a librarian to help you find a book, he or she will ask you a couple of questions to narrow down their recommendations to books that might work. These are questions you may know the answer to, but if not, they will give you something to think about the next time you and your child share a book.

bookwormWhat does your child like? The best place to start is with a topic or subject that interests them. It can be trucks and trains, sports or sports heroes, or things they like to do: be a ballerina, climb trees, etc.

What will your child do with the book? In selecting your books, think about how you plan to use the book: will you read with her; is this a book that you'll both read or will your son read it independently; or do you want her to explore the book, regardless of whether there is any reading.

abstract_reading.pngDoes your child like books of a certain size? Some kids like thin books; some don't mind longer books, but the chapters have to be short; and some want the fattest book they can find. Even if a book looks "too easy," don't discount it. If something grabs him in this book, he will reach for another one to learn more.

And finally, pictures. What kind (if any) illustrations do they like? Art in a book is a matter of taste, just as it is in a museum. Children's books are filled with abstract imagery, collages, photography, bright colors, dark hues, and more. What kinds of imagery seems to keep your daughter's attention? What makes your son ask you to close the book?

You've probably noticed that I didn't ask "fiction or nonfiction?" Knowing your child's interests, your reading goal, and what they like to see in a book will help guide that decision. It is the logical next question, and I know there are others.

So, what would your next question be? Librarians, we'd love to hear your suggestions on ways that parents can prepare for finding the "it" book before they get to the library.

BenBois_Magic_ball.pngThe answer for finding that "perfect" book comes from the non-book things your child loves. By tapping into that passion, the odds are pretty good you can find that wow-I-want-to-read-some-more book. And they will think you are the world's greatest magician because you read their minds!

If you find that there is a glitch trying to post the comments, send me an email and I will update this post. [terry {at] thereadingtub [dot} com].

Image Credits
Magic Hat 1 by slanteigne on OpenClipArt.org
Bookworm by ajeynes on OpenClipArt.org
Reading2 by Machovka on OpenClipArt.org
MagicBall by BenBois on OpenClipArt.org

Pam

Thursday Three Thirteen: Summer Picture Books

Posted by Pam on July 8, 2010 at 10:42 AM in Picture BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

I'm doing something a little different today. Instead of writing paragraph reviews of three books, I'm giving quick summaries of thirteen picture books. But these are special picture books, selected by me over my years of experience with the titles to put together a list that represents many different and diverse summers.Even as a proclaimed beach bum, I've limited my shore stories to only two leaving room for the many ways people see summer in the city, in parades, in the pool, and even abroad. I've also organized this list in order of the author, making it easier to print out and find the books at your local library. Let us begin with my personal favorite that just happens to be first...

BeachBeach
by Elisha Cooper
A day at the beach is captured beautifully in a series of seashore scenes from suntanning to swimming to shoveling sand. A beach-lovers delight.

And Then it Rained : And Then the Sun Came Out...
by Crescent Dragonwagon, illustrated by Diane Greenseid
In one side of this story, the rain just won't stop, but turn the book over and it's the story of a blaring sun-baked town that needs the refreshing (turn it over) rain. Very clever.

Bebé goes to the BeachBebé goes to the Beach
Susan Middleton Elya, illustrated by Steven Salerno
A sprinkle of Spanish words throughout the text sets apart this beach tale of one bebé who keeps his mama quite busy.

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever
by Marla Frazee
Two boys spent the week at Grandpa's "camp," with different interpretations of the activities then the adults around them. Terrific fun.

Mermaids on ParadeMermaids on Parade
by Melanie Hope Greenberg
Everyone loves a parade - and mermaids for that matter - and this book celebrates both in its depiction of the annual Coney Island event.

Come on, Rain
by Karen Hesse, illustrated by Jon J. Muth
In the heat of the city, a girl waits for the rain to cool things off, and then celebrates by dancing outside with friends and family when it finally comes. Joyful and lovely.

When the Fireflies Come
by Jonathan London, illustrated by Terry Widener
A slow summer day of barbecue and baseball turns into a slow summer night with friends and fireflies. What could be better?

The Boy Who Wouldn't SwimThe Boy Who Wouldn't Swim
by Deb Lucke
Regardless of the heat, a young boy won't swim in the pool, but finally gives in to find that he never wants to get out!

Summer Sun Risin'
by W. Nikola-Lisa, illustrated by Don Tate
A day on a farm in the summertime includes plenty of chores, but also time for fishing and stories for an African-American family.

Think Cool ThoughtsThink Cool Thoughts
by Elizabeth Perry, illustrated by Linda Bronson
A young girl tries to keep cool in her city apartment, but is excited by the prospect of sleeping on the roof with her mom and aunt.

Summer: an Alphabet Acrostic
by Steven Schnur, illustrated by Leslie Evans
Summer stables become poems as linoleum-block illustrations set the scenes.

Monsoon AfternoonMonsoon Afternoon
by Kashmira Sheth, illustrated by Yoshiko Jaeqqi
On a visit to India, a boy learns of the pleasures to be found in the summer monsoon season through the eyes of his beloved grandfather.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation
by Mark Teague
An imaginative boy spins a tale of Wild West adventures when asked about his summer vacation. How's yours going?

Next week I'll look at chapter books about summer - ones that can be read alone or to a child. Who knows, maybe we'll get into books for teens. In the meantime, if you have a favorite book about summer, share it in the comments.


Links to books in this post are affiliate links for the Amazon Associates program, for which the site MotherReader.com may receive a referral fee.

Pam

Thursday Three: Funny Picture Books

Posted by Pam on June 24, 2010 at 10:29 AM in Picture BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

It's hard to pick funny picture books, because the age of the reader makes such a big difference. Even a year in development can completely change the nature of the book. For instance, my go-to book for reading in classrooms was Sweet Tooth, by Margie Palatini because doing a cranky voice for the named tooth is well, so sweeeeet. When I tried this book with kindergartners though, they didn't really get it or laugh. However, first and second graders loved it. So, what I've shared today is a progression of funny books, from a lightly amusing book for a preschooler and moving up in age. Enjoy.


Mouse Was Mad
by Linda Urban, illustrated by Henry Cole

Mouse Was MadMouse was definitely mad, but as he expresses himself by hopping, stomping, screaming and more, other animals take the starch out of his tantrum by showing him how expertly hopping, stomping, screaming and more can be done. Finally mouse finds something he does better than anyone, and it calms him down. While there is certainly a lesson to be learned here about taming a tantrum, it is amusing to see the other animals take his actions at face value and challenge his technique. Great story, with Henry Cole's always friendly illustrations.


Dinosaur Woods: Can Seven Clever Critters Save Their Forest Home?
by George McClements

Dinosaur Woods: Can Seven Clever Critters Save Their Forest Home?Coming construction is going to chase a bunch of animals out of their wooded home, and though they try to talk to the people, no one will listen. They come up with a plan to build a dinosaur, knowing that people won't tear down the woods with a dinosaur. They all try to work together but Something Goes Wrong. However when the animals are exposed they turn out to be endangered and the woods are preserved after all - along with their friendship. Lots of amusing asides and touches throughout the book keep it funny. Look for the specially named "Crabby-Faced Punching Rabbits" or the great facial expressions on the collage illustrations. Environmentally safe and seriously fun.

The Hermit Crab
by Carter Goodrich

The Hermit CrabA shy hermit crab, stumbles into being a hero when he dons an unusual "shell" - the discarded, broken top half of an action figure. When a crab trap lands in an unfortunate place - "Hey, where's the flounder? Has anyone seen the flounder?" - everyone see the hero near the trap and assumes that he's responsible for moving it and saving the day. But the best part is in the unexpected result. The hermit crab draws into the shell, doesn't take credit, doesn't change, and leaves the "hero" shell as soon as he can. I love the idea that it's okay to stay out of the limelight. It's okay to be shy. Funny pictures add to the joy of this quirky book.

Terry

Bookworm Basics: The Rainy Day Bookshelf

Posted by Terry on June 23, 2010 at 11:00 AM in RecommendationsSeriescreative literacy
Bookmark and Share

Books are great to share every day, but it is also nice to keep a few books in reserve for those times when you need to jump-start some interest in literacy activities and can't get to the library or bookstore. This is a stash of books - and it doesn't need to be many - that are the perfect response to "Mom, I'm bored!"

Joke books and riddles keep the kids talking to each other and laughing for hours. These books are essentially anthologies. They have lots of content, there is no required order of reading, they are (usually) good for mixed-age audiences, and everyone will find at least one thing that tickles their funny bone and/or stumps them.

Activity books are titles that engage the reader to use the book. Although workbooks fall into this category, I'd recommend keeping the fun in the books on your rainy day shelf. Coloring books and learn-to-draw books are always fun, as are books of word games (crossword puzzles, word hunts, and word scrambles). These types of books can often be found in a dollar store.

A kid-friendly craft or project book can offer hours of activity, too. A quick check at Amazon.com returned nearly 800 craft/project books for kids - 756 of them for kids ages 4 to 12! So if you want to find fun in a subject that interests them ... there is probably a book for that! Some need more unique supplies, so you may want to read carefully through the book to make sure you will have what you need on that rainy day.

Last but not least, books with blank pages (bound or spiral) are also good to have on hand. You may even think about adding a special set of crayons or pens to keep with it. Kids can turn the "empty book" into art or story portfolios, reporter's notebooks, lists of their favorite (or least favorite) things, journals ... anything their imagination dreams up.

Do you have any favorite books you like to save for rainy days?
_____
Note: Book cover images link to the Childrens and Young Adult Bloggers Literary Awards (CYBILS) affiliate account with Amazon.com. Purchases made through these links can earn income for the Cybils, but there is no obligation to use those links or to purchase the product.

Pam

Thursday Three: Bedtime Books

Posted by Pam on June 10, 2010 at 7:00 AM in Picture BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

Sleepyhead,
by Karma Wilson, illustrated by John Segal

Sleepyhead In this simple story, a grown-up cat tries to get the little bear to go to sleep,but the little bear wants to delay bedtime just a little bit longer. Surprise, surprise. The sing-song feel of the text —isn't a straight rhyme scheme, but uses rhyming words and a gentle rhythm. The beautiful watercolors are dreamy. One thing I particularly like about the book is the characters: a cat and bear, both of indeterminate gender. It could be a mother and son, father and daughter, aunt and niece, etc. The two characters from different species also leaves it open as an adoption story, perhaps of a child of a different race. In any case, it's a lovely bedtime book to be shared with a special little bear of one's own.


No More Yawning!
by Paeony Lewis, illlustrated by Brita Granström

No More Yawning!Generally I'm not a big fan of bedtime books where the child keeps getting out of bed or otherwise disrupting bedtime. They tend to make me feel more like the child needs more limits and parental authority. But this book includes yawning, and having yawning in a bedtime book is pure genius, because as the parent reads the book with the yawns, the child starts yawning and is soon ready for bed. In fact, it makes it a little confusing that the mother keeps telling the little girl, "No more yawning," even though it is paired with all the other instructions like "No more kissing" or "No more singing" or "No more stories." Yawn away, I say. Cute book and nice, soft watercolor illlustrations. Oh and good tips on falling asleep are included in the back.


Once Upon a Time, The End (asleep in 60 seconds)
by Geoffrey Kloske, illustrated by Barry Blitt

Once Upon a Time, The End (asleep in 60 seconds) In this tale, the father is putting his kid to bed, but just wants to get through the bedtime stories as quickly as possible. The stories are all the classics, just shorter. Much, much shorter. And generally with a theme of going to sleep at the end of each one. A great book for parents. Oh, and for kids too, but particularly ones that are old enough to get the references to the classic stories and the overarching tongue-in-cheek theme that "enough already, bedtime is NOW."

Terry

Bookworm Basics: Bedtime Stories (5 to 9)

Posted by Terry on June 9, 2010 at 10:30 AM in Book Buying Easy ReadersPicture BooksRecommendations
Bookmark and Share

Creating a starter library can be lots of fun, but it can also get very expensive. Kids are interested in more involved stories and the list of bedtime stories is endless. There are bedtime-themed books that cover their worries (monsters, the dark) or their favorite things (dinosaurs, unicorns), as well as quiet, soothing stories that have nothing to do with sleep but are perfect just before lights out.

Because there are so many options, it may help to borrow a couple from the library to see if any become instant treasures and then make a buying decision (or not). This is also the time that many families introduce chapter books into their bedtime routine. I'm a picture book gal, myself, but I have discovered some great early-reader chapter books that allow us to share reading with our daughter.

Thumbnail image for bread-and-jam.jpgTo start, you can't go wrong with any of Pam's Beginning Bookshelves recommendations. You'll find some favorite characters from our childhood, like Curious George, Madeline, and Frances; and new friends like Fancy Nancy, Knuffle Bunny, and the Pigeon. Some of these stories now have multiple editions, too. For example, there is an easy reader edition of Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban. Here are a few more recommendations ...

anatole.jpgSusan Thomsen and her son like Anatole by Eve Titus. Anatole, a mouse who lives in France, rides his bicycle to the cheese factory each day. He earns his living tasting cheese and offering suggestions on how to improve it. Anatole is a 1957 Caldecott Honor Book, and Anatole and the Cat is a 1958 Caldecott Honor Book. There are two other titles in the series: Anatole and the Toy Shop and Anatole and the Piano. These last two books are out of print, but probably available at your library.

monster-trap.jpgThe Monster Trap by Dean Morrissey was a favorite in our house for about a year! Paddy, a young boy, is staying with his grandfather. His house seems different - spookier - than he remembered. Paddy can't sleep because he is sure he heard a monster. Together, they build traps to catch the monsters, each trap becoming more elaborate than the last. When they finally snare a monster, they learn just how much fun these critters are. This book turns the monster theme upside down. From Publishers Weekly: "The pictures comically reveal benign, silly-looking creatures as the source of the boy's fears."

poppleton.jpgCynthia Rylant's easy reader series - Henry and Mudge, Mr. Putter and Tabby, Annie and Snowball, the High Rise Private Eyes, and Poppleton - are wonderful stories that allow you and your audience to share the reading. The stories are light, build on each other, and have a twist that make it fun for adults and children alike.

To see the full list of favorites, and to keep the ideas in an easy-to-grab spot, I have created a list of these titles at Indie Bound and an Amazon aStore.

Note: The bookcover images in this post link to Amazon.com and include an affiliate code that, through purchases, may earn income for the Children's and Young Adult Bloggers Literary Awards (aka Cybils). The Indie Bound List and aStore include an affiliate code for the Reading Tub that, through purchases, may earn income for this literacy nonprofit. You are not obligated to use those links or make purchases through them.

Pam

Thursday Three: Anticipation

Posted by Pam on June 3, 2010 at 11:36 AM in Recommendations
Bookmark and Share

I generally make it a point to profile books that are not only published, but ones that are likely to have made it to the public library system. But today, I'm going to take you into my world of books where I hear about books long before they are published and have the chance to get excited about their release. When I'm really lucky, I get a chance to look at them in a gallery form. There are times that this little perk is all that keeps me book blogging.

So it is with that introduction, that I share three books that I picked up at Book Expo America last week. Three books that made my book blogger heart go pitter-patter.

Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion
by Mo Willems
KKTBD_KnuffleBunnyACautionaryMusical_138.jpgYou know if I went to the Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical than I must have a fond spot for the books. (Okay, and Mo.) The plot of the picture books is simple: girl has bunny, girl loses bunny, girl finds bunny again. But it's not about the plot. In the first book, the subtext is the frustration of a toddler in not being understood (Aggle Flaggle!) and the helplessness of the parent in not understanding. The reward at the end is Trixie's first word - and by extension the families move to the next level of communication. In the second book, the loss of the bunny is surrounded by a conflict with a peer and ends with a discovery of real friendship. The parent conflict contained within is that of mothers and fathers struggling with encouraging strength and independence, yet wanting to save our dear children from any hardship. The third book sees Trixie on a trip to Holland to see her grandparents, and losing Knuffle Bunny this time exposes the whole family to the idea of When Hope May Be Lost. I won't give away the ending, especially in terms of what is learned, but I don't believe that you'll be disappointed. This title is available September 2010.

Clementine, Friend of the Week
by Sara Pennypacker; illustrated by Marla Frazee

Clementine, Friend of the WeekIf you haven't met Clementine yet, than you really must get to your local library and pick up the first three books in the series. Clementine is another spunky girl, following the trend of Ramona, Junie B.,and Judy Moody. I like all of these characters, but would highlight the differences in Clementine. She's not as bratty as Ramona, she doesn't mix up words like Junie B., and she's not a self-centered as Judy Moody. Instead, Clementine is a artistic, clever, attention-challenged third grader who tries to do the right thing, and it too often goes wrong. Amusingly and charmingly wrong. In this new book, she is shares her excitement about being friend of the week with her slightly older best friend Margaret, who then gives her advice on how to act during the week. Clementine gives it a go, but it doesn't work out as planned. In the end, she realizes that she has been a good friend all along - and maybe even inspired others to greater empathy. It's another wonderful book with a good message and winning illustrations. This title will be available July 2010.

Guys Read: Funny Business
edited by Jon Scieszka

P5270009.jpgThe First Children's Literature Ambassador Jon Scieszka has been spending his time asking, "What about the boys?" With a book release two years ago of Guys Write for Guys Read (right now bargain-priced at $4.80!) and a Guys Read website devoted to good books for boys, Scieszka has again taken on the role of advocate. This new book of short stories features some amazing authors, namely Jon Scieszka, Mac Barnett, Adam Rex, David Yoo, Paul Feig, Kate Dicamillo, Christopher Paul Curtis, Eoin Colfer, Jack Gantos, and Jeff Kinny in a book intended to bring about the funny. After seeing the authors present the concept in a talk at Book Expo America, I have no doubt that they will meet their goal. Any presentation where Groucho glasses are handed out - well, that has to be a good sign. This title will be available September 2010.

Support for PBS Parents provided by: