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Dinosaur Discoveries

Drawing Birds

Help your child learn the names of different parts of a bird they observe.

Materials

  • photographs of 5-10 different birds (from library books, or printed from Internet)
  • local park or backyard to observe birds
  • blank paper
  • clipboard
  • camera (optional, but very helpful)
  • colored pencils, crayons, or markers
  • paint, variety of colors
  • colored feathers
  • white glue
  • binoculars (optional)
  • field guide to birds in your area

Directions

  1. Show your child a video clip from “Laura the Giganotosaurus,” in which Laura the Giganotosaurus talks about her passion for bird-watching — and shows them pictures of birds she’s drawn.
  2. Next, show your child pictures of 5-10 different birds (from library books or printed from the Internet). Try to find pictures of birds that are commonly sighted in your state. (This information is available from field guides, the local library, or nearby bird-watching clubs.) Ask your child to look at the photos to see if she can find examples of these common bird parts. Have her compare the different colors and shapes of these parts:
    • Crown – top of the bird’s head
    • Bill or Beak – the bird’s mouth
    • Breast – the bird’s chest
    • Feathers
    • Feet – the bird’s toes and claws (called “talons” in birds of prey)
  3. Visit a local park. Have your child look for as many examples of birds as she can find. Have your child use notebooks and pencils to sketch quick pictures of any birds she notices. (If you have a camera, she can try to photograph them as well. If possible, use field guides to try to identify the birds.)
  4. Back at home, or in the classroom, have your child use the printable page as the basis for drawing a bird they observed. Have them first use a pencil to adapt the bird on the page. Then add color with colored pencils, crayons, or markers.

Take It Further

  • Contact a local bird-watching group in your area. You can usually find bird-watching groups by looking on the Internet, or contacting local nature preserves or local parks. Find out if you can attend one of their meetings to observe birds that live nearby.


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2012 The Jim Henson Company. JIM HENSON'S mark & logo, DINOSAUR TRAIN mark & logo, characters and elements are trademarks of The Jim Henson Company. All Rights Reserved.

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