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Dinosaur Discoveries

Dinosaur Discoveries

Category: New Species

A team of scientists have uncovered three dog-sized dinosaur specimens. The fossilized bones, around 85 million years old, were found on a farm in Alberta, Canada. The species, Acrotholus audeti, weighed 85 pounds when it lived and is the oldest known pachycephalosaur from North America and maybe even the world. The Acrotholus audeti had a skull more than two inches thick. Scientists sometimes refer to pachycephalosaurs as thick-headed lizards or bone-headed dinosaurs because of their skulls.

Learn more about this discovery at TIME NewsFeed here.

Porcupine quills, big fangs, and a parrot-like beak are only three of the strange qualities that this newly discovered plant-eating dinosaur, known as the Pegomastax africanus, possesses.

This tiny Dino, measuring in at about 2 feet tall, is a newly discovered species of heterodontosaur. It is about the size of a housecat and used its giant fangs for self-defense and for attracting mates.

For more on this discovery, and to check out the making of this Dinosaur model, visit National Geographic.

The non-profit science and education group the Australian Age of Dinosaurs has found an exciting new discovery in Queensland, Australia.

Among the remote site, they discovered 15 fragile bones as well as very unusual fossils that have never been seen before.

Scientists have yet to confirm what type of ancient reptile that the bones are from, but they believe they are those from a dinosaur.

For more visit ABC News.

Researchers made an unbelievable find last week in Argentina when they discovered a previously unknown species of saber-toothed squirrel, called Cronopio dentiacutus, similar to the ever-popular “Scrat” character from the “Ice Age” movies. The small animal, measuring no more than 6 inches long, was from the late Cretaceous period, making it the first creature of the Mesozoic era to ever be found in South America. The discovery uncovered two partial skulls and jaws of the creature, which, according to scientist Christian de Muizon from the Paris Museum of Natural History, “can be more relevant to [their] understanding of mammalian evolution and biogeography than hundreds of isolated teeth.”

Read more about this amazing discovery at ABC News!


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