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Education

Learning Disabilities

Teaching Strategies

adult tutorDeciding which teaching strategy is right for your child is not always easy. Here are some guidelines you can follow to help you choose which teaching strategies are right for your child:

  1. Beware of simple solutions.
  2. Because children learn in a number of different ways, there is no single method for helping all children with learning disabilities. Good teaching is intentional, systematic, and takes time.

  3. Ask questions.
  4. It is important to know whether the strategy you are considering has been effective with other children. Some of the questions you may want to ask are:

    • Has the strategy been studied?

    Qualified researchers who will not profit by the results should conduct the study. The results should appear in respected magazines or journals, not as advertisements.

    • Who has been helped by this strategy?

    The strategy should be helpful to children with learning disabilities of the same age, sex, and ability as your child.

    • Can this strategy be harmful to my child?

    Consider whether the strategy will make your child feel comfortable and more independent or whether using it will make her feel embarrassed and different.

  5. Trust your instincts.
  6. Many people may offer suggestions for helping your child, including teachers, therapists, and other parents. Listen to what others suggest but remember that you know your child best. Gather information, ask questions, and then use those strategies that seem to be most appropriate for your child.

Back to Strategies Home

  • http://www.educationandbehavior.com Rachel Wise

    I like how you point out that children learn in different ways. I recently tutored a student who did really well when I incorporated movement into his learning activities. For instance we practiced leaning how to spell three letter words by having him run to the first letter, then the second, then the third. He was so motivated that he started picking up on words like cat, bat, rat, and pig, wig, gig in no time. Some students do well when you combine different learning approaches. For example when teaching a child to read you can have him make the word with play-doh, create the word by giving him the letters out of order, see the word on flashcards, and spell the word aloud. Some children show great progress when you teach the concept in a multitude of ways.

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