Support for PBS Parents provided by:


  • Cat in the Hat
  • Curious George
  • Daniel Tiger
  • Dinosaur Train
  • Odd Squad
  • Peg + Cat
  • Sid the Science Kid
  • Super Why!
  • Wild Kratts
  • Martha Speaks
  • WordGirl
  • Thomas & Friends
  • Arthur
  • Sesame Street
  • The Electric Company
  • Cyberchase
  • Between the Lions
  • Mama Mirabelle
  • Caillou
  • Chuck Vanderchuck
  • Oh Noah
  • Fetch!
  • Fizzy's Lunch Lab
  • Maya & Miguel
  • Mister Rogers
  • Postcards from Buster
  • Clifford
  • SciGirls
  • Wilson & Ditch
  • WordWorld
  • DragonFly TV
  • ZOOM

Education

Learning Disabilities

The Importance of Reading

boys and girls readingReading is essential for a child’s success. All too often, the barriers faced by children with difficulty reading outweigh their desire to read and, without proper guidance, they never overcome them.

Learning to read is a sequential process; each new skill builds on the mastery of previously learned skills. Early on, for example, children learn to break down words into their most basic sounds in a process called decoding. Later, they begin to comprehend the meaning of words, sentences and, ultimately, entire passages of text.

Decoding creates the foundation on which all other reading skills are built. For many, decoding comes naturally, quickly becoming an automatic process. For people who struggle to decode words, however, the process requires such extreme concentration that they often miss much of the meaning in what they read. Indeed, according to many experts, decoding problems are at the root of most reading disabilities.

The following medical and educational facts emphasize the importance of recognizing and addressing a reading problem early on, when a child still has the opportunity to maximize the development of fundamental skills like decoding, and further underscore the importance of early intervention:

  • Roughly 85% of children diagnosed with learning difficulties have a primary problem with reading and related language skills.
  • Most reading disabilities are neurodevelopmental in nature.
  • Neurodevelopmental problems don’t go away, but they can be managed.
  • Most children with reading disabilities can become proficient readers and can learn strategies for success in school.
  • When a child’s reading disability is identified early, that child is more likely to learn strategies that will raise his or her reading to grade level.
  • Back to Reading Home

    What's this?

    Sign up for free newsletters.

    Connect with Us


    PBS Parents Picks

    1. Cardboard Rings image

      Cardboard Rings

      Help your child turn their favorite shapes into adorable rings!


    2. Decadent Fudge Brownies image

      Decadent Fudge Brownies

      Next time your family needs a brownie fix, these brownies will definitely hit the spot.


    3. DIY Spinning Carousel image

      DIY Spinning Carousel

      Want to make a fun DIY toy that moves? This kinetic carousel spins wildly and demonstrates potential and kinetic energy.