Support for PBS Parents provided by:


  • Cat in the Hat
  • Curious George
  • Daniel Tiger
  • Dinosaur Train
  • Peg + Cat
  • Sid the Science Kid
  • Super Why!
  • Wild Kratts
  • Martha Speaks
  • The Electric Company
  • WordGirl
  • Thomas & Friends
  • Cyberchase
  • Arthur
  • Sesame Street
  • Between the Lions
  • Mama Mirabelle
  • Caillou
  • Chuck Vanderchuck
  • Oh Noah
  • Fetch!
  • Fizzy's Lunch Lab
  • Maya & Miguel
  • Mister Rogers
  • Postcards from Buster
  • Clifford
  • SciGirls
  • Wilson & Ditch
  • WordWorld
  • DragonFly TV
  • ZOOM

Education

Creating a Musical Home Environment

Dad and kids making music with pots and pansYour child spends more time at home than any other place. This is especially true at preschool age, but even after kids begin school, home is still the predominant source of most experiences. It’s the parents’ responsibility to create the environment in the home, so it’s important that you include music in a meaningful way. Start by incorporating any of these simple steps into your daily routines.

  1. Immerse your home in music. Whenever appropriate, have music playing in the home. It really doesn’t matter what type of music. Ignore the media hype that suggests only Mozart enhances your baby’s intelligence. There is no evidence to support that claim, and it limits other musical genres that your child may find particularly meaningful. Play music—any and all music.
  2. Actively listen to music. While having music playing in the background is extremely helpful, it is also important for your child to attend to and interact with music regularly. You can do this by moving his or her hands or legs to the music with a young child, and sparking conversation and asking questions with an older child. Even preschool children can be responsive to topics such as, “How does this music make you want to move?” or “This music makes me feel like ice skating.” Conversing about what you’re hearing not only focuses your child’s attention to the music but also suggests that music is something that elicits a response.
  3. Sing with your child. Singing with your child is an excellent way to help them internalize music. It doesn’t matter how well you sing as a parent, you can still sing simple songs. As with most things concerning young children, repetition is important. Singing a small number of songs on a regular basis will help your child learn basic melodies and rhythms.

    Singing along with music, especially songs made for children, is a fun way for you and your child to spend time together. We are lucky to have so much quality music available for children.

  4. Dance with your child. Dancing with your child is another fun way to encourage learning about music while spending time together. The ability to find and move to the steady beat of music is fundamental to all future musical ability, so practicing this skill through dancing is an excellent (and fun) way to facilitate its development. If your child is experiencing difficulty, don’t get discouraged! According to researchers, girls often develop this skill around three years of age, which is earlier than boys, who may still have trouble finding a beat well into kindergarten.
  5. Make music together. As your child gets older, you can make a great impact on them by making music together. If they play the piano, you might consider a duet with them. If you play an instrument, you might play along with them as they sing. Any combination in any genre of music will send a strong message to your child about the shared joy of making music.

As a parent, you are a role model, and what you do is very important. Show how important it is to you to your child by incorporating any of the tips and music activities for kids listed above. If you play an instrument, regardless of your ability, play it for your child. If you love dancing, dance with your child. If you simply love listening to music, show your child how important listening is by actively modeling how you listen to music.

If you convey to your child that music is important to you, it becomes important to them and they’ll begin to pay closer attention to the music they hear. Developing a love and respect for music early on allows your child more time to connect with and find meaning in music later in life, and helps them learn rhythm and beat. Your role in this is easy: be a role model for your child and celebrate music!

Lastly, remember that music is one of life’s most meaningful experiences. It is a uniquely human experience, and as such it should never be forced on a child. Instead, make music a part of everyday life that improves everything we do. If you instill this value in your child at a young age, they will be grateful when they’re older as they continue to explore a relationship with music.

  • Pingback: A Musical Home . Education . PBS Parents | PBS

  • Maya ZHANG

    en en.

  • Nikamkavita

    really music is the voice of the eaternal power. it makes joy ,peace and comfort to everyones life. it is a pathway to touch the hearts and minds. so it is precisely the easiest way to keep in touch to your children.

  • Jeff

    Music is love. It transcends status and wealth and background. It encourages focus on the present moment. It is medicine, it is intoxication, it is pain, and suffering, and joy, and celebration.

    “Let there be songs to fill the air” -RH&JG


What's this?

Sign up for free newsletters.

Connect with Us


PBS Parents Picks

  1. What's for Lunch? image

    What's for Lunch?

    Try Applegate's HALF TIME, a new natural & organic lunch kit!


  2. Daniel Tiger Finger Puppet image

    Daniel Tiger Finger Puppet

    Need a cool craft for your child's Daniel Tiger party? Try this fun finger puppet!


  3. Hispanic Heritage Month  image

    Hispanic Heritage Month

    Make fun crafts and recipes while learning about influential Latinos.


Eat Smart for a Great Start Newsletter

×

PBS Parents Newsletter

Find activities, parenting tips, games from your child's favorite PBS KIDS programs and more.

×