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Education

The Importance of Art in Child Development

Toddler cutting paperIn recent years, school curricula in the United States have shifted heavily toward common core subjects of reading and math, but what about the arts? Although some may regard art education as a luxury, simple creative activities are some of the building blocks of child development. Learning to create and appreciate visual aesthetics may be more important than ever to the development of the next generation of children as they grow up.

Developmental Benefits of Art

Motor Skills: Many of the motions involved in making art, such as holding a paintbrush or scribbling with a crayon, are essential to the growth of fine motor skills in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, developmental milestones around age three should include drawing a circle and beginning to use safety scissors. Around age four, children may be able to draw a square and begin cutting straight lines with scissors. Many preschool programs emphasize the use of scissors because it develops the dexterity children will need for writing.

Language Development: For very young children, making art—or just talking about it—provides opportunities to learn words for colors, shapes and actions. When toddlers are as young as a year old, parents can do simple activities such as crumpling up paper and calling it a “ball.” By elementary school, students can use descriptive words to discuss their own creations or to talk about what feelings are elicited when they see different styles of artwork.

Decision Making: According to a report by Americans for the Arts, art education strengthens problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The experience of making decisions and choices in the course of creating art carries over into other parts of life. “If they are exploring and thinking and experimenting and trying new ideas, then creativity has a chance to blossom,” says MaryAnn Kohl, an arts educator and author of numerous books about children’s art education.

Visual Learning: Drawing, sculpting with clay and threading beads on a string all develop visual-spatial skills, which are more important than ever. Even toddlers know how to operate a smart phone or tablet, which means that even before they can read, kids are taking in visual information. This information consists of cues that we get from pictures or three-dimensional objects from digital media, books and television.

“Parents need to be aware that children learn a lot more from graphic sources now than in the past,” says Dr. Kerry Freedman, Head of Art and Design Education at Northern Illinois University. “Children need to know more about the world than just what they can learn through text and numbers. Art education teaches students how to interpret, criticize, and use visual information, and how to make choices based on it.” Knowledge about the visual arts, such as graphic symbolism, is especially important in helping kids become smart consumers and navigate a world filled with marketing logos.

Inventiveness: When kids are encouraged to express themselves and take risks in creating art, they develop a sense of innovation that will be important in their adult lives. “The kind of people society needs to make it move forward are thinking, inventive people who seek new ways and improvements, not people who can only follow directions,” says Kohl. “Art is a way to encourage the process and the experience of thinking and making things better!”

Cultural Awareness: As we live in an increasingly diverse society, the images of different groups in the media may also present mixed messages. “If a child is playing with a toy that suggests a racist or sexist meaning, part of that meaning develops because of the aesthetics of the toy—the color, shape, texture of the hair,” says Freedman. Teaching children to recognize the choices an artist or designer makes in portraying a subject helps kids understand the concept that what they see may be someone’s interpretation of reality.

Improved Academic Performance: Studies show that there is a correlation between art and other achievement. A report by Americans for the Arts states that young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day on three days each week through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, to participate in a math and science fair or to win an award for writing an essay or poem than children who do not participate.

  • Marie Faust Evitt

    Thank you for this important article. I see many benefits to art education but I wasn’t aware of the correlation between art and academic acheievement.

  • ddd

    good

  • Ring Huggins

    If I had not started learning art in public school and crafts in the Cub Scouts I would not now know how to throw pots on a wheel, make gold and silver jewelry, tan hides, make leather goods and do lapidary and be able to teach all those skills without those starting inspirations at a young age.

  • Sam

    These were great reasons, but I worry that sometimes the conversation around art gets shifted to looking for the external benefits of art (e.g. art helps kids do better academically). While it is true that art has many developmental benefits, there is something to say about doing art for art’s sake. I think that opening our children’s eyes to new, exciting world found in art is reason enough. I am happy that the article provides

    • Geri Sue

      I wholeheratedly agree that the benefits of arts programs reach much deeper than the academic aspects, but pointing out the external benefits is crucial in the argument for protecting arts programs in schools.

  • Samantha

    I am actually writing a research paper on why art and music education shouldn’t be taken out of schools and this outlines the first five pages of my paper. The titles gave me key words to research so I could go more in depth on the benefits.

    • George Segovia

      Writing a research paper on this also!

  • Phil MaDoggins

    My name is Phil MaDoggins.
    CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORNCORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN CORN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Tess

      ……What?

  • Molly_M

    Iam conducting a syrvey on the importance of art for my thesis class. Would love if you would fill it out for me.

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JXT567L


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