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Education

Reading & Language

Baby Writing Milestones

Baby grasping toyBirth to 6 Months Old
Babies are just learning to use their hands. At first, your baby will not be able to grasp objects by himself, but he will awkwardly grasp a toy placed in his palm. Your 4-to 6-month-old baby can reach for and grasp things he wants. Babies will explore objects by putting them in their mouths.

6 to 12 Months Old
Babies gain more control over their hands. At this age, your baby is able to pass objects from hand to hand and may enjoy ripping and pulling materials. She is able to pick up very small objects using her thumb and forefinger. Babies’ hand movements become more precise, allowing them to feed themselves finger food and place rings on a post.

12 to 18 Months Old
Babies have developed the hand skills necessary for grasping writing tools and making marks on paper. Only at the very end of infancy, at 17 or 18 months, will your baby begin to become interested in writing. You should not expect pictures or even “coloring,” let alone letters, from your baby. By scribbling, your baby explores what he can do with crayons and paper and tries to imitate what he sees older children and parents do.


Encouraging Your Baby to Write

  • Chunky tools are easier for small hands. As your baby learns how to scribble, it is easier for the small muscles in his hands to grasp thicker writing tools. Markers, crayons, chalk, and paintbrushes are all available in special chunky “young child” versions that are ideal for beginners.
  • Use washable materials to save on cleanup. When your baby is learning to scribble, she doesn’t have a lot of control. Provide her with washable crayons, paints, and markers. A plastic smock or an old T-shirt can be used to protect her clothing, and a sheet of plastic or painting tarp can protect the floor. Talk to your baby about trying to keep marks on the intended writing or painting surface, but don’t expect perfection.
  • Use washable materials to save on cleanup. When your baby is learning to scribble, she doesn’t have a lot of control. Provide her with washable crayons, paints, and markers. A plastic smock or an old T-shirt can be used to protect her clothing, and a sheet of plastic or painting tarp can protect the floor. Talk to your baby about trying to keep marks on the intended writing or painting surface, but don’t expect perfection.
  • Talk to your baby about her scribbles. Ask your baby, “What did you write?” or comment on the colors she used. By asking her questions about and commenting on her work, you help her to understand that her marks on paper represent an object or an idea. Express pride in your baby’s work by offering specific comments, such as “You wrote a lot of letters!” or “What a big doggie you drew!”
  • Pingback: Reading & Language Milestones Tabs . Education . PBS Parents | PBS

  • Julie

     Im a childcare teacher and have a child in my three year old room who has many screaming tantrums.  What can I do with her because her behavior is so disruptive to the others in class. Is it ok to remove her from the room during these times?

    • tara

      how do i stay clam with a 8months old who has a bad temoer i mean bad

      • tara

        meant temper

      • Lynne

        I am not sure an 8 month old can have a bad temper yet. Don’t know what to say. Maybe talk to the pediatrician?

    • Megan

      Start reading up on co-regulation. Sounds like this three-year-old is still learning how to manage her feelings.

  • Mehbabyizagenius

    My daughter has just turned 19 months and can write the number 8 and 6 when asked. Is this normal?

  • Pingu007

    First I didn’t know what Terrible Twos meant but I found out with my 2 boys..It was a difficult time for us, not really knowing what to do..
    It all changed when I read an article on a
    blog and tried the method they talked about.
    Wow, that really opened our eyes. It worked and our boys behave now.

  • The Kid’s Cave

    I cannot agree more with the bigger sized tools. They are easier to grasp and control for those little hands.

  • Tabby

    my daughter is 11 months and just all by herself on purpose colored on a chalk board mainley dots and a few short lines

  • http://www.rookieparenting.com/ Pamela (Rookie Parenting)

    Great article. I’d add that “Address bad behavior” should only be done after the child has completely calmed down. Otherwise, their reasoning power is practically locked up and nothing would get through. Here are more tips on dealing with temper tantrums: http://www.rookieparenting.com/dealing-with-toddler-temper-tantrums/

  • Mrs Hancock

    My 19 mo has just started in this phase. I ask her if she needs a break, she usually nods yes. Then i breathe slowly with her. Once she calms down we figure out what was wrong and i give her simple words to express herself with. Usually works. When it doesnt, i move her to a slightly different location (room), make her safe, and let her go with it for a minute or two. Then we decide thats enough and we go about ohr day.

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