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Food & Fitness

Is It Time for Team Sports?

Baseball playersOrganized sports can help kids grow in many ways. From soccer to fencing, sports offer chances for kids to learn and master skills, work with their peers and coaches, and challenge themselves in a safe environment. They learn the value of practice and the challenge of competition. And on top of all that, sports provide natural and fun opportunities for kids to get regular exercise.

But before signing kids up for sports, parents should consider a child’s personality and developmental level to help ensure that being involved in sports is a positive experience for everyone.

When Should Kids Start Playing Sports?

As you think about signing kids up for sports, consider how emotionally and physically ready they are to participate. Signing up too early can end up being frustrating for everyone and can turn kids off from sports for good.

Although there are sports programs designed for preschoolers, it’s not until about age 6 or 7 that most kids develop the appropriate physical skills or the attention span needed to listen to directions and grasp the rules of the game. While preschoolers can throw and run, it usually takes some time before they can coordinate the two skills. And it usually isn’t until kindergarten or first grade that kids grasp concepts like “taking turns” that are crucial to many sports.

That doesn’t mean kids can’t play sports when they’re younger. Sports can be fun for toddlers and kindergartners, but they should be less about competition and more about having fun opportunities to be active. So even if young kids inadvertently score a goal for the other team or spend the entire game chasing butterflies, as long as they’re enjoying it, that’s OK.

Choosing the Right Sport

If kids show an interest in a sport, try to let them do it. You may be worried that your child will get hurt, particularly in a contact sport like football, but as long as the coach requires players to use the correct safety gear, your doctor OK’s it, and your child is matched up with other kids of the same size and ability, go ahead. Even if the sport doesn’t turn out to be a good fit, your child will learn much from the experience.

When choosing a sport, consider your child’s unique temperament. Some kids are naturally inclined toward team sports, while others may feel more comfortable in activities where the focus is on individual efforts. There’s something for everyone — from soccer and baseball for team-oriented kids, to tennis, fencing, karate, dancing and swimming for kids who’d rather go solo.

Don’t be surprised if it takes a few tries — or a few seasons — to find the sport that’s right for your child. It often takes time for kids to figure out which activities they enjoy. And once they do, be sure to head out to the field, gym or pool to cheer them on. Some kids may just not be interested in team sports, but they can still keep fit by engaging in other activities that don’t emphasize competition. No matter what they choose, kids should be physically active for at least 60 minutes a day.

If Kids Want to Quit

However kids feel when they enroll for a season of sports, there may come a time when they want to quit. If your child comes to you with this plea, try to find the reason behind it. It may have to do with something small and fixable, like a bad-fitting uniform, or it may be a bigger issue, like how comfortable your child feels with the coach or the kids on the team. It could also be that your child just doesn’t enjoy the sport.

Is it OK to let kids quit? If your child is on a team that depends on his or her participation, you may want to explain the importance of sticking it out for the season. If that’s not the case, then think about what you want your child to get out of the experience and how quitting would affect that.

When kids are overscheduled or unhappy, quitting may be the right thing to do. But it’s still important for all kids to be physically active every day, even if they’re no longer playing an organized sport.

Before Signing Up

Kids should have a physical examination before beginning any sports or fitness program. Those with certain medical conditions, vision or hearing problems or other disorders may have difficulty playing some sports. Rarely, a doctor may find an undiagnosed condition that can affect participation.

These are general guidelines to keep in mind. Kids mature at their own pace and develop their unique skills at different times, so consider your child’s emotional and physical maturity before you commit to a season of sports.

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    Sport all in one package. Like for the fun in interest sport , helping to build the good health , and for the career also. And specially sport helps to keep bones and muscles active and stronger and each part of the body get well formed with the sport. And here the great article for how to make a kid strong and active in sport so that will be beneficial more to the kid.


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