Beef and Broccoli by Table for Two

As a kid, ordering Chinese takeout was a real treat. We usually ate home-cooked meals every night. Fast forward a few decades later. I moved to New York City, where ordering Chinese food—or any food—became a reflex action. Seriously, how could I cook in a bite-sized kitchen?

At PBS Parents, I was lucky enough to connect with Alice Currah. Through her recipes on this blog, I learned that many popular dishes ordered in Chinese restaurants can easily be recreated at home. It costs less, and it’s healthier.

Our family still eats out—probably more than we should. But, my kids have given homemade Chinese a thumbs up, which inspires me to try more recipes, more often. I hope the incredible collection below inspires you to try too.

Wonton Soup by Canuck Cuisine
Wonton Soup by Canuck Cuisine

Chinese roasted ribs by The Woks of Life
Takeout-Style-Chinese Roasted Ribs by The Woks of Life

Kung Pao Chicken by Kitchen Explorers
Kung Pao Chicken by Kitchen Explorers

Chinese Sauteed Green Beans by Small Wallet Big Appetite
Chinese Sautéed Green Beans by Small Wallet Big Appetite

General Tso's Chicken by Brown-Eyed Baker
General Tso’s Chicken by Brown-Eyed Baker

Egg Drop Soup by Rasa Malaysia
Egg Drop Soup by Rasa Malaysia

Eggrolls by Kitchen Explorers
Eggrolls by Kitchen Explorers

Mapo Tofu by Fresh Tastes on PBS Food
Mapo Tofu by Fresh Tastes on PBS Food

Beef and Broccoli by Table for Two
Takeout Fake-Out Beef and Broccoli by Table for Two Blog

Plum Sauce by Savory Sweet Life
Chinese Plum Sauce by Savory Sweet Life

orange-chicken-vegetable-stirfry-680
Orange Chicken and Vegetable Stir-Fry by Kitchen Explorers

Salt and Pepper Tofu Restaurant Style by Veggie Belly

Salt and Pepper Tofu Restaurant Style (Vegan) by Veggie Belly

Shrimp Lo Mein by My Daily Morsel
Shrimp Lo Mein by My Daily Morsel

Easy Fried Rice
Easy Fried Rice by Kitchen Explorers

Sweet and Sour Pork by Viet World Kitchen
Sweet and Sour Pork by Viet World Kitchen

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  • Shay Awbrey Saenz

    What about the fried rice? I can never replicate that quite the same

    • Daniel R. Patterson

      The secret to fried rice is it has to be day-old. Cook the rice the day before you want to fry it, refrigerate it, and then use it the next day. Also, a good rice cooker makes the texture better.

      • Amanda Marlies Ching

        Agreed! Also, my mother in law taught me that you need to fry everything separate, and then fry the rice last, and add everything back in for an incorporating stir.

    • KL InIdaho

      You have to under cook the rice a bit (less water) and then refrigerate it over night. I keep trying to replicate as well, and I almost got it last time, except my rice was well done with the normal amount of water, so I will add less water this time. Also make sure it is long-grain rice, as the other types are for sticky rice. Yes, a rice cooker is essential, I have found.

    • Ruth Anderson

      If you scramble the egg in oil first, then once it’s mostly done add in your veggies. add more oil/soy sauce as needed. Add any meats you want, toss around in the pan for a few. Then add your rice. I have done it with both fresh and leftover rice, it seemed the same to me, honestly. I added a few drops cashew oil, and a lot of soy sauce (cause I love it). Toss around a bit more to mix it, then put a lid on to finish cooking the veggies and get all the flavors mixed in. That’s all. Add soy, or plum sauce, or sriracha or whatever you like from there. The biggest thing for me is what veggies to use. So if you want a particular type of flavor, pay attention to what is in your fav version. I love using a wee bit of onion, with big chunks of red and green peppers. Experiment though, there’s so many variations.

      • HarryPsalms

        When the question is about re-creating classic fried rice, your answer is horrible.

        • Ruth Anderson

          I got my recipe from a Chinese street vendor. Plus it’s delicious. When it comes to being helpful or informative, you are neither. Plus you are rude.

          • HarryPsalms

            Really? A “Chinese street vendor” told you to add in “plum sauce, sriracha, or whatever you like”?

            “Ive done it with fresh and left over rice…seems the same to me”
            It’s not.

            Again, the question wasn’t how to make something unique and different, in which case your answer would have been helpful. It was how to make the classic take-out Chinese fried rice, which is pretty much the same everywhere in the US and I guarantee you doesn’t contain cashew oil or sriracha.

            Sometimes steering someone away from a crap answer is plenty worthwhile, especially when the correct answer has been posted elsewhere already.

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