Support for PBS Parents provided by:


  • Cat in the Hat
  • Curious George
  • Daniel Tiger
  • Dinosaur Train
  • Odd Squad
  • Peg + Cat
  • Sid the Science Kid
  • Super Why!
  • Wild Kratts
  • Martha Speaks
  • WordGirl
  • Thomas & Friends
  • Arthur
  • Sesame Street
  • The Electric Company
  • Cyberchase
  • Between the Lions
  • Mama Mirabelle
  • Caillou
  • Chuck Vanderchuck
  • Oh Noah
  • Fetch!
  • Fizzy's Lunch Lab
  • Maya & Miguel
  • Mister Rogers
  • Postcards from Buster
  • Clifford
  • SciGirls
  • Wilson & Ditch
  • WordWorld
  • DragonFly TV
  • ZOOM
 

Talking with Kids about news


How to Help Kids Feel Safe

Mom and son talkingLearn what to do to minimize stress and maintain a sense of normalcy after a tragedy.

Quick Talking Tips

  • Find out what your child knows about the news.
  • Listen to what your child tells you.
  • Ask a follow-up question.
  • Shield children under age eight from disturbing news.
  • Avoid repeated TV viewings of the same news event.
  • Monitor older children's exposure to the news.
  • Develop an ongoing dialogue with your child about what's happening in the world.

More "Talking With Kids" Guides

Develop strategies for discussing today's headlines – from mass shootings, natural disasters and war.  Learn how to calm kids' fears, stimulate their minds, and encourage them to think about their place in today's world.

  • Mom comforting daughterTalking & Listening

    Discover how to talk with your child about the news, respond to her questions, and encourage her to think about what it means.

  • Mom hugging daughterAge-by-Age Insights

    Learn how kids, from preschoolers to preteens, comprehend the news. Plus get tips on how much news to let each age see and how to discuss it.


  • Twin boys with toy gunsWork it Out Through Play

    Find out how children's art and play reflects the news. Learn what to do if that play is filled with violent imagery.

  • Dad and son discussing hurricane in carDiscussion Starters

    Need to talk but your child won't?   Get the conversation rolling with tips on talking about violence, war, the meaning of holidays, and more.


Support for PBS Parents provided by: