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An anonymous soldier from the 442nd Infantry Regiment states his loyalty toward a diverse America in a newspaper article entitled "Stigma of 'Jap' is Resented by U.S. Japanese".
"Every single one of us, Americans of Japanese ancestry in the 442nd Infantry Regiment, would rather fight the 'Japs' than the Germans to prove our loyalty."
The intense desire of many loyal Americans of Japanese descent to be called and thought of as Americans rather than Japanese has been voiced by many of them serving in the 442nd Infantry Regiment at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. A number of troops from this regiment recently visited the Soldiers' and Sailors' Club, 283 Lexington Avenue, while on furlough, and in a letter of thanks to Miss Lillian Myles, a hostess at the club, one of them has even recorded their hope they could even fight the Japanese, instead of Germans, to prove their loyalty.
"I'm of Japanese ancestry, but by all rights of birth an American," he wrote. "I've always considered myself an American but by reasons of racial color some people have referred to me as a 'Jap.' There are nearly two regiments of us here in Shelby and that remark has hurt every one of us. Why can't Americans (regardless of racial differences) consider us true Americans, like they are?
"America isn't a nation of one nationality. It has a more cosmopolitan population than any other nation in this world. Then why should they have such terrible race prejudice on a minority? Looking back on American history we find that English have fought English and the consequence was the birth of a new nation, America. Then again in 1812 Americans of English ancestry willingly took up arms against Englishmen.
"In the first world war Americans of German and Italian ancestry fought against Germany, now in this war we find Americans of Italian, German and Japanese ancestry more than glad that they can fight the common enemy. Then why can't all Americans see that blood isn't as thick as the principles of democracy. Every single one of us, Americans of Japanese ancestry in the 442nd Infantry Regiment, would rather fight the 'Japs' than the Germans to prove our loyalty.

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