Watch ‘In the Family’ and ‘Critical Condition’ Online

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If you missed the premier of two great P.O.V films this week, you have a chance to watch the full films online! In the Family is streaming online until October 31, 2008 while Critical Condition is streaming until November 11, 2008.
Both films document intensely personal journeys and stories, and both are engaged with the issue of health care in America. During an election season in which health care reform has become one of the nation’s most hotly debated issues, Roger Weisberg‘s Critical Condition tells the story of four families living without insurance. The film lays out the human consequences of an increasingly expensive and inaccessible system.

In The Family is also a story of struggle and survival. Filmmaker Joanna Rudnick tells her story of testing positive for the BRCA gene (the “breast cancer gene”) at age 27. In trying to answer her own tough question about whether or not to take the irreversible step of having her breasts and ovaries removed as preventative measure, Joanna’s reaches out to other women and faces her deepest fears about her future. In the Family portrays the difficult choices that face these women, how families deal with grief and the relationships that are formed during trying moments in our lives.

After you watch the films online, you can browse the other sections of the In the Family and Critical Condition websites to learn more about issues raised in the films and to get an update on what has happened since filming ended. And from now through October 8, you can talk to a genetic counselor on the In the Family discussion board, or compare the health reform plans of presidential nominees McCain and Obama in terms of how they might have affected the characters in Critical Condition.

So point your browser over to the POV website, sit back in front of your computer with a box of tissues, and watch In the Family and Critical Condition.

Maggie Owsley is a student at NYU and an intern at POV Interactive.

POV Guest Blogger
POV Guest Blogger
POV (a cinema term for "point of view") is television's longest-running showcase for independent non-fiction films. POV premieres 14-16 of the best, boldest and most innovative programs every year on PBS. Since 1988, POV has presented over 300 films to public television audiences across the country. POV films are known for their intimacy, their unforgettable storytelling and their timeliness, putting a human face on contemporary social issues.
  • k.thompson

    FOREIGNID: 17499
    FOREIGNPARENTID:
    I WAS IN TEARS AS I WAS THIS DOCUMENTARY, I NEVER KNEW THAT SO MANY PEOPLE ARE HAVING THIS MUCH PROBLEM TO GET HEALTH INSURANCE. WHAT REALLY GOT TO ME WAS KAREN ,THE CANCER PATIENCE, THE HOSPITAL ACTUALLY CHARGE HER TO TAKE OUT EACH OF HER OVARIES AND THEY WERE DOING ONLY ONE SURGERY. IT’S VERY SAD TO SEE. IT’S GOT TO BECAUSE I AM A CANCER SURVIVOR AND I KNOW FIRST HAND THE PAIN THAT COMES WITH IT ALL. THANK YOU FOR CREATING THIS PIECE, AND INHOPE THAT WHOSOEVER IS ELECTED TO BE THE NEXT PRESIDENT DO SOMETHING TO HELP US ALL THROUGHOUT OUR TIME OF NEEDS.

  • pam mitchell

    FOREIGNID: 17500
    FOREIGNPARENTID:
    I am so scared for americans, such as me and my husband who just retired without healthcare coverage. I am a 25 yr. R.N. and my husband 25 yr.teamster trucker and we cannot afford bluecross/blueshield coverage, it would cost us $2,000.00/mo. which would cripple our ability to pay our bills. So we shopped forf cheaper coverage which only covers a fraction of all types of med. procedures i.d. for an open heart surg. it pays only $3,000.00, etc. It seems immoral to retire a healthcare worker w/o health care coverage, and auto workers retire with the best healthcare cvg. I am praqying that we can solve this disgraceful dilemma in the richest country in the world. We must put people first, whatever could be more important.

  • Melinda Murphey

    FOREIGNID: 17501
    FOREIGNPARENTID:
    Critical Condition made me cry. I went to bed and thought about all the Americans who don’t have insurance and how many die due to it. It’s just so sad. I think the saddest part of this documentary is when that grandfather got approved for medicaid then died two days later. How many deaths can be prevented if health insurance is more easily obtained?

  • http://Anne Anne

    FOREIGNID: 17502
    FOREIGNPARENTID:
    I was mesmerized by the program “In the Family”, which I happened upon while preparing lunch today. Having had my double mastectomies 25 years ago when my mother died from breast cancer (as had her mother) and losing a close friend to cancer at the same time, it took me back to that time when I needed to make a decision. There was no BRCA test at the time. I have never regretted the decision t have the mastectomies, in fact I have always been grateful that I no longer carry the fear that I will be diagnosed with breast cancer. I must add that my husband was extremely supportive, and for that reason, it was not a difficult decision for me to make. Had he not been supportive, I think it would have been a very difficult decision and I would probably never feel quite the same about him again, thinking he had put his own interests above my health. I do understand why many women have issues with even wanting to know if they carry the gene, because the consequences of knowing change everything. Again, I am grateful for the circumstances that allowed me to have the surgery and go forth in a life without fear of the future.

  • http://greeninoc.blogspot.com GreenInOC

    FOREIGNID: 19978
    FOREIGNPARENTID:
    PLEASE put this back online for people to watch.
    This is such a powerful piece of work that people NEED to see during the current debate.