Over-herd: Viewers Bleat About ‘Sweetgrass’

by |

Each Friday, we post a selection of viewer comments relating to the week’s film. This week, viewers watched Sweetgrass, a riveting and poetic portrait of the American West just as one of its traditional ways of life dies out. You shared your perspectives on sheepherding and the enthralling observational form of the film on our Sweetgrass film companion site, Facebook and Twitter.

“When I first started watching, my plan was to check it out and move on. Wrong. I was captivated from the very beginning. Talk about “organic.” From every viewpoint. I did not move til the end. Even then, I sat for a while just thinking about those amazing people.”
— Norma Curran

“I am also a fan of the Old West, and I get melancholy thinking of something like the sheep drive gone most likely forever. I was glad to be along for the final trek up and down the trail as a viewer of this fine film.”
— David

“I felt I was sitting in the tent, sliding down the mountain holding my skittish horses’ bridle, yelling at my dumb dog… What a treat for the senses AND the mind.”
— Vicky Young S (via Facebook)

“My Border Collie, Gwyn was absolutely glued to the TV. I just let both dogs in to escape the midday heat and we heard the bell during the opening scene and she ran in front of the TV again. Her favorite movie used to be Never Cry Wolf, guess it’s Sweetgrass now.”
— Capt’n Sky (via Facebook)

“amazing work done by sheep herders on @povdocs…I don’t think I would have lasted a day! #sweetgrass #baaaaa”
kym_m (via Twitter)

We’d love to hear more of your thoughts on Sweetgrass and other POV films. If you haven’t seen the film yet, watch it online for free through Oct. 4, 2011, then visit our Sweetgrass film companion site, Facebook or Twitter to join the discussion!


Watch the full episode. See more POV.

Ashlin Aronin
Ashlin Aronin
Ashlin Aronin is a 2011 intern in POV's Digital department. He is currently a student at Wesleyan University where he works as a videographer in the New Media Lab. Ashlin enjoys watching a wide range of films, but he is particularly interested in those which blur the line between truth and fiction. His favorite documentaries include: 1. Nobody's Business - Alan Berliner 2. Exit Through the Gift Shop - Banksy 3. Capturing the Friedmans - Andrew Jarecki 4. High School - Frederick Wiseman 5. F for Fake - Orson Welles