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Giveaway: Win a Pair of Tickets to See ‘Girl Model’ at Stranger Than Fiction in NYC

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Girl Model documentary poster

The entry window for this giveaway has passed. Congratulations to our winner Claire Shanley! View the official rules.

Here’s the film description from Stranger Than Fiction’s website:

Girl Model shows a rarely seen side of the fashion industry. The film brings a novelist’s eye for emotional and psychological complexity to its portrait of two women. Ashley, an American former model, travels to remote Siberian villages to scout young teenaged girls for fashion shoots in Japan. We see her discover Nadya, a thirteen-year old blonde, who radiates the innocence coveted by Ashley’s clients. Like thousands of other Russian girls, Nadya sees modelling as the best chance to support her family. She feels lucky when Ashley’s agency offers a contract with guarantees. But as the film follows Nadya to Japan and Ashley on her further scouting trips, we see each one grapple with the kind of harsh realities that fashion magazines tend to ignore.

Stranger Than Fiction logo

Stranger Than Fiction is a documentary series held at the IFC Center, hosted by Thom Powers and Raphaela Neihausen. STF presents an eclectic mix of documentaries – sneak previews and lost classics – followed by discussions with the filmmakers and post-show receptions. Find out more at stfdocs.com.

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POV Staff
POV Staff
POV (a cinema term for "point of view") is television's longest-running showcase for independent non-fiction films. POV premieres 14-16 of the best, boldest and most innovative programs every year on PBS. Since 1988, POV has presented over 300 films to public television audiences across the country. POV films are known for their intimacy, their unforgettable storytelling and their timeliness, putting a human face on contemporary social issues.
  • http://www.facebook.com/jeffery.davis.98478 Jeffery Davis

    Would have to vote for this one for sure, was wonderful1

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.vantaylor David Van Taylor

    yes, a great film. and why the heck shouldn’t we call it a documentary?

  • Linguist

    No documentary can relate a person’s entire history, nor should it. “Being Elmo” accomplished what it was set out to accomplish, as far as I can tell: Tell us the story of Kevin Clash’s journey to becoming the puppeteer of one of the most successful Muppets of all time. It wasn’t a tell-all of Kevin’s life or allegations thereof. Whatever may or may not be true of Clash’s private life takes nothing away from his professional career or the validity of “Being Elmo.”

    As far as the comment below regarding the “enigma” of how an introvert could so keenly communicate about love – Seriously? Being an introvert has exactly nothing to do with being able to love and/or communicate about love.

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.vantaylor David Van Taylor

    I haven’t seen “Being Elmo” (sorry!). But it is certainly true that any film can’t and shouldn’t do everything on a topic, whether it’s a portrait or not.
    Otherwise your film will have no, shall we say, point of view.

    I wonder whether the filmmakers of “Being Elmo” knew anything about his aspect of Clash’s life, and chose not to include it, or whether they just didn’t know. Either is perfectly legitimate and understandable in my view.

    Of course sometimes the failure to confront a certain aspect of a story can seem at the time and in retrospect to be a missed opportunity–to tell a more interesting and deeper story. Though I *loved* Man on Wire, I was left with the feeling that they wanted to gloss as lightly as possible over what a self-centered jerk Phillipe Pettit could be; his betrayal of his comrades at the last gave a glimpse into a deeper portrait, but was quickly left behind in what seemed an attempt to have a more uplifting ending.

    I guess I’m saying that there’s no blanket rules here. I’m glad Tom you’ve raised the question, but it has no simple answer …