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Upcoming POV Documentary Screenings Near You

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Stillwater, OK

My Reincarnation
Friday, April 27 2012, 5:30pm
Come to a screening and discussion at OSU CineCulture-Oklahoma State University. Sabine Krayenbuehl, editor of My Reincarnation, will join after the screening for a Q&A via Skype. To find out more, email d.blum(at)okstate.edu.

Malden, MA

Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars
Sunday, April 29 2012, 1:00pm
The Malden Public Library brings you a free screening of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars as part of the Malden Reads Soccer Extravaganza. Malden Reads invites the community to read the same book and participate in a series of events related to the book’s themes. The screening will take place at Salemwood School and explore themes related to refugees, immigrants, and community from the book Outcasts United, about a refugee soccer team. For more information, visit maldenreads.org.

Salt Lake City, UT

Biblioburro
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 2:00pm
Check out a free screening at the Day-Riverside Branch Library as part of El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day). This event is a celebration of children, families, and reading that emphasizes the importance of literacy for children of all linguistic and cultural backgrounds. In addition to the screening, there will be bookmaking crafts, a children’s international ballet performance, and storytelling/puppet shows. And don’t forget to get your free book! For more information, visit slcpl.lib.ut.us.

And for those of you near Georgetown, TX, don’t forget about StoryCorps, starting next Tuesday! Check out “Listening Is an Act of Love” at Georgetown Public Library This May.

For a full listing of upcoming screenings, visit our local events calendar. Don’t see your city on the map? Interested in seeing a POV documentary near you? It’s easy! Join our Community Network. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @POVengage for the most up-to-date news from Community Engagement and Education!

Aubrey Gallegos
Aubrey Gallegos
Aubrey started at POV as an intern in 2011, and worked briefly as Special Events Coordinator before moving into a full time position as Community Engagement and Education Coordinator. Prior to joining POV, she spent three years as an environmental educator and deckhand aboard wooden sailing ships, including the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, which was co-founded by Pete Seeger. She has also worked as an Event Manager for UnionDocs, a documentary art space in Brooklyn, and served as a Production Assistant on a number of independent film and theater productions. Aubrey graduated from Whitman College with bachelor’s degree in Rhetoric and Film Studies. Aubrey's favorite documentaries are: 1. Dont Look Back 2. Salesman 3. Sweetgrass 4. Food, Inc. 5. The Up Series
  • Bryan Tucker

    Thanks for writing this Tom. I’ve often wondered about this, and there is little information out there about Netflix deals for filmmakers. I’m planning for self-distribution of my doc in the fall, and came across Distribber as an option to get it on Netflix. Haven’t spoken w/ anyone directly at Distribber, but through their website they seem confident in negotiating w/ Netflix on the filmmakers’ behalf (for a flat fee upfront, then low annual cost). Anyone used them before and have any thoughts on their abilities? Thanks.

  • Anonymous

    also for content partners looking to monetize their own apps on Connected TV devices/tablets companies like adRise help develop apps for free adrise.com

  • Lafayette

    I don’t recommend Distribber. They couldn’t get my doc onto Netflix. It was a really unpleasant experience dealing with them. Try New Video, Virgil, or Gravitas.

  • JohnH

    Right now Netflix is not looking for volume but “curated content” (their term), which is why they prefer working with companies that actually select their films, and not just acquire whatever comes their way.

  • Daniel Montoya

    Netflix doesn’t pay much. If you’re lucky you get $5,000 for your film and a deal in which they pay you cents per each stream. I recommend trying to get first broadcast, international sales and leave Netflix for last, not first.

  • Patrick Shen

    Back in 2010 I got $15k for a 2-year deal. Though it was favorably reviewed and rated 30k+ times (not sure how many views – maybe 3-4x that?) they chose not to renew my contract. It got a lot of eyes on my film and for that reason it was a favorable experience for me. My new film will be pitched to them (through Film Buff) in the coming months. We’ll see how it goes.

    • Anyextee

      Did you go direct with Netflix or through a third party distributor? I
      am a new filmmaker, have a grass roots buzz behind my film “Egypt
      Through The Glass Shop” and would like to get the film placed on Netflix
      for streaming. What is the process for submission? Will they do these
      deals direct or is it required that I go through a third party? Please
      advise.

      • Patrick Shen

        Went thru a distributor. Netflix doesn’t accept direct submissions from filmmakers. You can reach out to digital distros like Film Buff, The Orchard, Gravitas, etc. You might also want to look into services like Distribber. Good luck with the film!

  • Icecube

    Thanks for writing this Tom. Netflix streaming do not pay well also they dont consider your production untill it i very good and untill you have a deal.

    Streaming .

  • Andrew James

    We got 7K for CLEANFLIX for 12 months on Netflix. Not good if you ask me…

    • Anyextee

      did you go direct with Netflix or through a third party distributor? I
      am a new filmmaker, have a grass roots buzz behind my film “Egypt
      Through The Glass Shop” and would like to get the film placed on Netflix
      for streaming. What is the process for submission? Will they do these
      deals direct or is it required that I go through a third party? Please
      advise.

  • Anyextee

    @patrickshen:disqus @disqus_j1we6uiAzS:disqus did you go direct with Netflix or through a third party distributor? I am a new filmmaker, have a grass roots buzz behind my film “Egypt Through The Glass Shop” and would like to get the film placed on Netflix for streaming. What is the process for submission? Will they do these deals direct or is it required that I go through a third party? Please advise.

  • Rama Ratnam

    It is rather odd to pity the attitudes in India about menstruation (for e.g., the author finds the movie “sad, and funny, and essential,” which are presumably statements about India) but does not question his own views on finding the title of the film to be weird. If Western men find the word menstruation to possess an “ick” factor, then what does the movie say about men in general? Indian, Western, or otherwise? Muruganantham is an example to all men.

  • Jeff Schmidt

    John Sanbonmatsu: And how many people have been hurt by Pilgrim? How many people, for that matter, were hurt by Fukushima?

    ” NRC officials lying to the public, and shutting down debate;”

    When have NRC officials lied to the public? Can you please provide me specific examples that I can research? As for shutting down debate – there’s a time for public meetings. But, at the end of the day, it is the job of the NRC to make rulings, based upon the law and based upon known scientific and engineering expertise that the NRC *does* have and the public does *not* have.

    Quite frankly, while the public should be free to express concerns, and the NRC should be responsible to make sure that those concerns are adequately addressed to protect public safety, it is the NRC itself which is equipped to determine that it HAS sufficiently addressed those concerns, not the ignorant public. (And I consider myself part of that ‘ignorant public” – I’m not a nuclear engineer – what do I or anyone else in the public who aren’t nuclear engineers, know about whether a design is safe or not? If the construction and practices at the plant put the public at risk? I and the public are absolutely not equipped to make that technical evaluation, but many in the public are deluded into thinking they somehow do know what is and isn’t safe).

    If nuclear is so dangerous, where is the “parade of horrors” that surely should have materialized after 60 years and become self-evident?

  • curlyfriesordie

    i am so heartbroken. and angry.

  • PW

    Nuclear technology was originally designed as a weapon of mass destruction. It was only belatedly adapted to power generation. The problems with nuclear power to the core of the technology and the demonstrated inability of its handlers to control it. This has nothing to do with cars and handcranks.

  • WP

    There was a little place called Chernobyl. Another place in Russia call Kyshtym? Reactor meltdown with 1,000 victtim acknowledged by Russian (Soviet!) authorities, global fallout, and 800 sq. km of land uninhabitable for over 40 years, and some still closed. Three Mile Island and other smaller leaks have also produced radiation levels up to 100s of times above background levels (or the oft-mentioned chest x-ray). Show me another power generation technology that produces this? A better question is, why is anybody so anxious to prop up this expensive dinosaur technology when we have better alternatives available? To me, a failure of imagination combined with the financial and lobbying power of the nuclear industry.

  • Jeff Schmidt

    WP: Chernobyl was really the only epically bad accident of the ones you listed. Even that is expected to kill fewer than 10,000 people. It’s not absolutely known how many it will affect, but that is the upper bound. But, more importantly, Chernobyl was an old, dangerous design. In the US, there was NEVER a reactor design in use as bad as the Chernobyl design. The USSR’s epic fuckup isn’t a universal damnation of the entire technology.

    As for Three Mile Island, you need to check your sources, because almost no radiation was released at TMI, and no detectable increase in radiation in the surrounding area was ever found, so I call BS on your claim that “have also produced radiation levels up to 100s of times above background levels”.

    This is the whole problem with the nuclear/anti-nuclear debate. The anti-nukes don’t seem to do a very good job of fact-checking their claims.

    They claim, repeatedly, that we are just one accident away from massive killoffs of human and other life forms, but the science just does NOT support that. If that were likely, it would have already happened.