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Spread the Word in the Final Hours! ‘Neurotypical’ Premieres Tonight

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Organizations and individuals across the country are getting the word out about Neurotypical, and you can too! Neurotypical airs tonight on POV and will be streaming for free online through August 28th.

Let your community know about the film. Visit the Neurotypical Partner Toolkit where you can find sample tweets, easy ways to embed the film trailer on your Facebook or blog, a reminder email template and more.

Looking for inspiration?

See our Storify round-up below for how people are using Tweets and Facebook posts to let their community know about the films.

 

 

POV Staff
POV Staff
POV (a cinema term for "point of view") is television's longest-running showcase for independent non-fiction films. POV premieres 14-16 of the best, boldest and most innovative programs every year on PBS. Since 1988, POV has presented over 300 films to public television audiences across the country. POV films are known for their intimacy, their unforgettable storytelling and their timeliness, putting a human face on contemporary social issues.
  • dennis

    the folks in the show obviously have challenges…but alas…another autism discussion which ignores Autisms dirty secret…those who cannot speak, are sometines violent,injuring themselves, their families their caregivers..those that can never ever fend for themselves…ever- 24 hr care 7 days a week..dosen’t make for good t.v though

  • John Conti

    Really disappointing program. People with autism who are low functioning are completely ignored.

  • BrueklynDad

    Agree that the spectrum is far to broad than one hour allows. So unfortunately there was too much weight placed on folks with Aspergers. As the father of a PDD child, I would have hoped to see some airtime given to ABA therapy which has helped my 10 yr old reconnect or at least strengthen some of the neural pathways and allow him to improve his abilities in social settings.
    The bottom line is that these kids will eventually outlive their parental nest and have to deal with the neurotypical world in one form or another, and anything we can do to help them in that area will be valuable. In that respect, I found Wolf’s story particularly insightful.
    Other cases where the parents just shook their heads in resignation were heartrending. It is one thing to accept a child’s condition on the spectrum. It is another to accept it and find ways to improve the child’s quality of life through any interventions or therapies that are effective.