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Conservation

The World Conservation Union
This group includes 83 states, 110 government agencies, more than 800 non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and some 10,000 scientists and experts from 181 countries in a unique worldwide partnership. According to their website, the Union is the world's most largest and most important conservation network. One of their initiatives is the Red List of Threatened Species, which lists the most endangered species in the world. The 2004 list includes the Painted Terrapin, a critically endangered freshwater turtle found in southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

Traffic
The website of Traffic, the wildlife trade monitoring network, is the central site for information on global trade and trafficking in wild plants and animals. 

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
CITES is an international agreement between governments that sets rules on trade in specimens of wild animals and plants. The website includes information on the law, a list of signatory countries and reports on compliance.

World Wildlife Fund (WWF)
The WWF organization started in 1961 with the goal of saving endangered species from extinction. The site currently features information about their "flagship species," which include giant pandas, rhinos, elephants and marine turtles, among other animals. Follow links to updates and laws recently passed to preserve the habitat of the turtles.

Turtle Survival Alliance
This alliance is a membership organization for people involved in sustainable captive management of freshwater turtles and tortoises. One of their conferences is featured in the film. The website reports on ongoing projects. 

POV's Borders: Environment - Carl Safina
POV's online series featured a field journal by marine biologist Carl Safina in which he describes his work on sea turtle conservation. The site also includes a variety of links to related environmental organizations.

The Endangered Species Act of 1973
Read the full text of the Act that regulates treatment of endangered species in the U.S. online, or download as a PDF. The site also provides a link to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Endangered Species Program where you can learn about the successful effort to remove the bald eagle from the endangered species list earlier this year.

 

Turtles

Nature: The Reptiles: Turtles and Tortoises
A turtle's shell is among the most peculiar but successful pieces of design in the natural world. Unchanged for 200 million years, it has allowed the various species of turtles to populate almost everywhere in the world. But the limitations of life in a shell are causing turtles problems in today's world. Overexploitation by humans has caused many turtle species to become extinct or endangered. This episode introduces some inspirational people who are trying to help them.

Asian Turtle Crisis
The website of the New York Turtle and Tortoise Society includes a wealth of links to articles on issues related to Asian turtles as well as links to related organizations.  The site also includes graphic photos of the slaughter and marketing of turtles in China.

 

ORGANIZATIONS

Asian Turtle Conservation Network
A non-profit consortium of people, projects and institutions based within the Asian region and actively working to conserve Asia's turtles.

Chelonian Research Foundation
This nonprofit organization was founded in 1992 for the production, publication and support of worldwide turtle and tortoise research, with an emphasis on the scientific basis of chelonian diversity and conservation biology. (All living turtles belong to the crown group Chelonia.)

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
An international agreement between governments whose aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.

International Reptile Conservation Foundation
One of the principal aims of the IRCF is to support conservation and research programs that contribute to the survival of threatened reptiles and their habitats. The IRCF works in concert with the scientific community, educators, and professional conservation organizations as a part of the total conservation solution.

Turtle Conservation Fund
The TCF administers a turtle conservation and research grants program. Awards are granted to organizations or individuals for specific conservation or research projects dealing with tortoises or freshwater turtles, but not marine turtles, with either partial or full support as funding allows.

Turtle Survival Alliance
The TSA is a partnership network for sustainable captive management of freshwater turtles and tortoises. One of their conferences is featured in the film. The website reports on ongoing projects. 

California Turtle and Tortoise Club
On their website, members of the California Turtle and Tortoise Club have gathered a wide range of informational resources on turtles and tortoises, including articles, images and links to other regional or local clubs.

New York Turtle and Tortoise Society
This nonprofit organization is dedicated to the conservation, preservation of habitat, and promotion of proper husbandry and captive propagation of turtles and tortoises. The Society emphasizes the education of its members and the public in all areas relevant to the appreciation of these unique animals.

 

ALSO ON PBS AND NPR

PBS.org Websites

Bill Moyers Reports "Earth on Edge"
In 1999, an international group of more than 70 scientists analyzed the condition of the five ecosystems on which all life most heavily depends — freshwater, agriculture, forests, grasslands, and coastal ecosystems. The program presents the findings of these scientists, as well as stories of ordinary people working to restore the health and well-being of the ecosystems they — and ultimately all of us — depend on. (June 19, 2001)

Empty Oceans, Empty Nets
Learn more about the marine fisheries crisis and the pioneering efforts of fishermen, scientists and communities to sustain and restore these fisheries and our oceans. An ongoing international debate surrounds the complex problems and how best to solve them. Understanding why some fisheries are thriving while most are in serious decline may be the key to averting an impending food crisis. (April 22, 2002)

Nature: The Reptiles: Turtles and Tortoises
A turtle's shell is among the most peculiar but successful pieces of design in the natural world. Unchanged for 200 million years, it has allowed the various species of turtles to populate almost everywhere in the world. But the limitations of life in a shell are causing turtles problems in today's world. Overexploitation by humans has caused many turtle species to become extinct or endangered. This episode introduces some inspirational people who are trying to help them.

Scientific American Frontiers "Wild Places"
Wild places are disappearing at an alarming rate. Alan Alda learns that sometimes saving endangered species requires restoring whole ecosystems. (February 6, 2001)

 

NPR Stories

Day to Day: The Turtle Man of Tribeca
NPR's Madeleine Brand meets a man whose New York City apartment is crammed with [hundreds] of turtles. (December 16, 2003)

All Things Considered: Divine Help Sought for Sea Turtles
Mistaken for fish, thousands of sea turtles are illegally slaughtered in Mexico for Lenten meals. Environmentalists are on a campaign to protect the endangered reptiles — and they want the pope to help. (March 27, 2002)

Day to Day: A Racy Ad Campaign to Save Sea Turtles
In Mexico, a new campaign to protect endangered sea turtle eggs has been launched across the country with the help of a controversial spokesperson: Playboy model, singer and pin-up icon Dorismar. (October 10, 2005)

Morning Edition: Endangered Turtle Stays in Touch
A rare turtle was discovered in Cambodia just before it was about to be smuggled into China and into the vast underground market for rare animals. The endangered animal was saved thanks to a microchip underneath its skin. The microchip was previously implanted to help scientists track the movement of these turtles. (July 20, 2005)

Morning Edition: Southeast Asia's Illegal Wildlife Trade
Illegal wildlife trade totals billions of dollars a year globally, but conservationists say the problem is most acute in Southeast Asia. Despite international and local laws designed to crack down on the trade, live animals and animal parts — often those of endangered or threatened species — are sold in open-air markets throughout the region. Growing demand, porous borders and the lure of big money make it a lucrative business. (November 3, 2003)





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