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The "Good German"

Why are some people spurred to act in the face of government-sponsored injustice while others stand by and do nothing? We explore the phenomenon of the "Good German" with journalists, human rights experts and historians.

The Judge and the General: John Dinges

John Dinges
"I'm a journalist, not a human rights activist. For me the decision was how I could investigate and tell the truth about what was happening and overcome the veil of fear, secrecy and impunity that kept most people — willingly or not — from seeing what was going on in Chile, both inside and outside the country." Read more »


The Judge and the General: Mark Ensalaco

Mark Ensalaco
"Few anticipated that Guzmán — a conservative judge who openly confesses that his support for the coup was his "original sin" — would conduct a serious prosecution in the foreboding political climate in Chile ... [but his] commitment to the rule of law, his sense of common human decency and his empathy towards those who had suffered under 'Pinochetismo' drove him on." Read more »


The Judge and the General: Naomi Roht-Arriaza

Naomi Roht-Arriaza
"It takes the confluence of courageous individuals and social conditions to create change. Happily, even though Pinochet died without a final trial and conviction, some 300 of his officials, including the major remaining masterminds, have been indicted, tried and convicted." Read more »


The Judge and the General: Carol Tavris

Carol Tavris
"Evil acts are far more commonly perpetrated by good people who justify the evil they do in order to preserve their belief that they are good people. This documentary shows that there but for the grace of our circumstances and decisions most of us, too, could be Pinochet — and we could be Guzmán." Read more »





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