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Mugabe and the White African

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PBS Premiere: July 26, 2011

Synopsis

Mugabe and the White African, much of which was filmed clandestinely, tells an alarming story from one of the world’s most troubled nations. In Zimbabwe, de facto dictator Robert Mugabe has unleashed a "land reform" program aimed at driving whites from the country through violence and intimidation. One proud “white African,” however, has challenged Mugabe with human rights abuses under international law. The courage Michael Campbell and his family display as they defend their farm — in court and on the ground — makes for a film as inspiring as it is harrowing. (90 minutes)

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TAGS: africa, farmer, international court, land, land rights, mugabe, race relations, zimbabwe

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Film Information

Mugabe and the White African (90 min.)

Premiere Date: July 26, 2011

Streaming Dates: Expired

Photos: Download Here

Trailer: Link | Embed

Filmmakers: Lucy Bailey, Andrew Thompson Bio | Interview | Statement

Press: Press Release | Critical Acclaim | Fact Sheet | Economist Film Project Selection Press Release

Filmmakers

Lucy Bailey
Lucy Bailey
Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson

We wanted to make a film about a big issue like the land reform program policy in Zimbabwe, but in a very intimate and personal way. ”

— Lucy Bailey and Andrew Thompson, Co-directors

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Film Update

Critical Acclaim

Many viewers will leave Mugabe and the White African thinking that they have seen few, if any, documentaries as wrenching, sad and infuriating, and those feelings will be justified.”

— Mike Hale,
The New York Times

Heart-wrenching, enraging. . . . The film is an unmissable portrait of courage under fire.”

— Peter Gradshaw,
The Guardian

Extraordinary”

— Andy Klein,
Christian Science Monitor

A powerful and particularly well-made film . . . Searing, and sharply told.”

— Verne Gay,
Newsday

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