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Video: History of the International Criminal Court

This video traces the history of the International Criminal Court (ICC) from the Nuremberg Trials and the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals to the international response to conflicts in Uganda, Sudan and Colombia. Learn about the Rome Conference and the United States' resistance to the ICC in 1998, and the efforts of the Office of the Prosecutor to bring perpetrators of crimes against humanity to justice.

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Produced by Skylight Pictures in collaboration with Facing History and Ourselves.

This video can be viewed in its entirety here, or in segments:

The History of the ICC: Part 1 of 3

History of the ICC: Part 1 of 3This segment provides an overview of the conficts and international tribunals that preceded the creation of the International Criminal Court, from the Nuremberg Trials in 1945 to the Yugslav and Rwanda Tribunals in the 1990s. Watch now »


The History of the ICC: Part 2 of 3

History of the ICC: Part 2 of 3This segment begins with the Rome Conference, which took place in 1998, when 140 countries gathered to ratify the statute that would become the constitution for the new court, and the United States' opposition to the establishment of an international court. Watch now »


The History of the ICC: Part 3 of 3

History of the ICC: Part 2 of 3The International Criminal Court came into existence in 2002 after 66 countries ratified the Rome Statute. This segment traces the establishment of the new court and outlines the ICC's process of bringing the perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity and crimes of war to justice.Watch now »


Free workshop for educators

Facing History and Ourselves is facilitating an online workshop about the International Criminal Court, free for educators, December 1-15, 2009.

To find out more about the workshop and register, go to www.facinghistory.org/reckoningworkshop.





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[T]he film is about accountability. It's about bringing the perpetrators of the worst crimes happening in the world to justice.”

— Pamela Yates, Filmmaker