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Bio

Find out more about Revolution '67 filmmaker Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and her other work and upcoming projects.

Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno, Producer/Director,
Jerome Bongiorno, Cinematographer/Editor/Animator

Revolution '67 - Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno

Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno

Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno are award-winning husband-and-wife filmmakers who formed their own production company, Bongiorno Productions, in Newark, N.J. Marylou is a graduate of New York University's Graduate Film Program, where she received the $75,000 Richard Vague Film Production Fund award for the feature film "Little Kings," based on her multiple award-winning short.

The Bongiornos' documentary Mother-Tongue: Italian American Sons and Mothers, featuring Martin Scorsese, earned an Emmy nomination and screened at the 2006 Venice Film Festival. Their global warming-themed screenplay, Watermark, was featured at Sundance's Investing in Media That Matters and the Tribeca Film Festival/Sloan Summit and was the centerpiece of a Johnson Foundation Wingspread Conference on Global Warming and Film in 2005.

Marylou and Jerome are in preproduction for the fictional version of "Revolution '67," executive-produced by Spike Lee. They are currently completing a series of short films on post-Katrina New Orleans and flood-plagued Venice, Italy, screening on PBS' Natural Heroes series and at film festivals. The Bongiornos are the recipients of a Film Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. They are longtime residents of Newark, N.J., where Marylou has lived all her life.





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The story of Newark is a very intriguing subject, a universal one that's replayed in cities all over the world where corruption, ineffective government, and greed create chaos for a majority of people.”

— Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno, Filmmakers

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Street Fight | Newark: A Brief History

From Puritan stronghold to industrial mecca to "Renaissance City," Newark, New Jersey, one of the poorest cities in America, has undergone a series of radical transformations.

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