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There's a radicalization that occurs from the time Ralph Bunche is at Harvard to Howard. In 1928 when he published his first article he speaks in admirable terms about black leadership in Chicago and throughout the country. Five years later, he's talking to the Detroit Civil Rights Club and this is the kind of language he uses; he says, "I come from the nation's capital and I awake every morning with a sickening stench of pussyfooting, sophisticated Uncle Tom, pseudo Negro leadership in my nostrils. There, the race has some highly paid so-called Negro leaders, many of whom hold their positions by carrying tales about other Negroes to the white folks, an old plantation custom. In Detroit is elsewhere I suppose when a Negro gets an official job when he gets in the Government, he promptly forgets all about his race and its problems and devotes all of his efforts towards buttering his own bread." So, his views have changed.


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