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Destination: Galapagos Islands Cyber Field Trip
FOR TEACHERS

Galapagos National Park Rules:
Introducing the Concept of Preservation


Developed by Beth Schultz, preservice teacher at St. Norbert College, De Pere, Wisconsin.


Grade Level: Middle school
Basic Concepts:

Respect for the environment, preservation, conservation
Content Areas: Language arts, science
Time: 1 1/2 hours
Objectives:



Students will discuss the reasoning and motivation behind the Galapagos National Park Rules, practice critical thinking and improve their verbal communication skills.
Materials:




Galapagos National Park Rules
(Educator version, below)
Galapagos National Park Rules
(Student version, below)
A journal or notebook
Procedure
  1. Distribute park rules to students. Explain that these rules have been established to protect the delicate and unique environment of the Galapagos Islands. Anyone who visits the Galapagos must strictly abide by these rules.

  2. Break students up into groups of two or three and have them dicuss one rule. Ask them to determine the consequences that may result if the rule is broken. Then have them deduce the motivation behind the establishment of the rule. Students may think of more than one reason. Also, remind students that the rules apply not only to the islands, but also to the marine environment surrounding the islands. Therefore, their responses should apply to both land and marine environments.

  3. Have students record their responses in their journals for assessment (see rubric below).
Extensions
  1. Challenge students to further investigate the policies and procedures of the Galapagos Islands National Park using the Internet or other library media.

  2. Encourage students to find out whether public parks in their community have similar rules.

  3. Invite students to study more in depth the effects of introduced species, pollution and tourism on the environment.

Assessment

Assessments should be made on the basis of the students' journal entries. Inform students of the criteria listed in the following rubric ahead of time. A successful student will receive no less than two "Always" and one "Sometimes."

Rubric for Galapagos National Park Rules

Students Name:__________________________

Key:    Always=A; Sometimes=S; Never=N

Displays critical thinking A S N
Applies to both land
and marine environments
A S N






Galapagos National Park Rules (Educator version)
  1. No plant, animal, or remains of such (including shells, bones, and pieces of wood) or other natural object should be removed or disturbed. This is illegal, and can harm the edcological balance of the island.

  2. Be careful not to transport any living material to the island, or from island to island. Check your clothing for seekds or insects before each landing and departure. Each island has its own unique fauna and flora, introduced species can quickly destroy these ecosystems.

  3. Do not take any food to the uninhabited islands, for the same reason. The orange see you drop may become a tree.

  4. Do not touch or handle the animals. They will quickly become fearful and lose remarkable fearlessness if they are approached by human invaders.

  5. Do not startle or chase the animals from its resting or nesting spot. Be especially careful among the breeding seabird colonies. An exposed booby chick can die within minutes, or be scooped up by a hungry frigate bird.

  6. Stay within the areas designated as visiting sites. Watch for trails and areas marked by the white wooden stakes. This way you can experience the islands while causing as little damage as possible.

  7. Do not leave any litter on the islands, or throw any off your boat. Carry along a bag of some sort if you're going to have any disposables, such as film wrappers or tissues. Litter is not only ugly; more importantly it can cause serious physical harm to the animals. Sea turtles, for example, will eat plastic thrown overboard and die when it blocks their digestive tract.

  8. Do not deface the rocks. No graffiti-this is not the New York subway.

  9. Do not buy souvenirs or objects made of plants or animals from the islands. If anyone offers you any, please advise the National Park Service.

  10. Do not visit the islands unless accompanied by a licensed National Park guide. And follow his or her instructions at all times.

  11. Restrict your visits to officially approved areas. There are certain areas where the public is permitted, and others where access id restricted or prohibited. Your guide and captain know which areas you are allowed to visit. Don't try to get them to take you somewhere you're not supposed to be.

  12. Show your conservationist attitude. Explain rules to others, and help to enforce them. Notify the National Park Service if you see any damage being done. You could be a decisive factor in the islands' preservation.

International Galapagos Tour Operators Association. (November 6, 1997).


Galapagos National Park Rules (Student version)
  1. No plant, animal, or remains of such (including shells, bones, and pieces of wood), or other natural object should be removed or distured.

  2. Be careful not to transport any living material to the island, or from island to island.

  3. Do not take any food to the the uninhabited islands.

  4. Do not touch or handle the animals.

  5. Do not feed the animals.

  6. Do not startle or chase the animals from its resting or nesting spot.

  7. Stay within the areas designated as visiting sites.

  8. Do not leave an litter on the islands, or throw any off your boat.

  9. Do not deface the rocks.

  10. Do not buy souvenirs or objects made of plants or animals from the islands.

  11. Do not visit the islands unless accompanied by a licensed National Park guide.

  12. Restrict your visits to offically approved areas.

  13. Show your conservationist attitude.

International Galapagos Tour Operators Association. (November 6, 1997).


Related Resources

*Charles Darwin Research Station. (2-20-98).Latest update on the 1997-98 El Nino event in Galapagos.
Update on earlier report about 1997-98 El Nino event in the Galapagos. Much more concise format.

*Clark, D. & Giddings, A. (Producers and Directors). 1996. Galapagos Beyond Darwin [Film].
Available from Discovery Channel Video.
This video focuses on the present day Galapagos Island, covering topics such as evolution, research, adaptation of species, and threats to the islands. Wonderful footage of many aspects of the islands.

*Environmental News Network. (7-18-97).
Study documents new threats to Galapagos Islands.

*International Galapagos Tour Operators Association. (1-10-98). The Galapagos Islands: A world heritage site.
Includes pictures, links, specific information about the islands, issues, references, climate, and National Park Rules.

*International Galapagos Tour Operators Association. (1-10-98). Issues facing the Galapagos.
Specific information about the issues facing the Galapagos Islands. Includes several pictures.

*Lemonick, M. (1995, October 30). Can the Galapagos Islands survive? Time Magazine
A wonderful article about the issues facing the Galapagos Islands. Pictures support the text.

*World Wildlife Fund. (3-31-98). Educador passes new law to protect Galapagos: WWF hails move as "gift to earth".
Latest information about the newly passed Galapagos Conservation Law.

*World Wildlife Fund. (2-16-98). The Galapagos Islands.
A collection of brief facts sheets compiled by the WWF. Specifically concentrate on biological diversity, people, threats, responses and challenges.

*World Wildlife Fund. (3-31-98). Victory in the Galapagos Islands.
Most recent information about the newly passed Galapagos Conservation Law.

*World Wildlife Fund. (2-16-98). The Galapagos: Pressures on Paradise.
Extensive page dedicated to the Galapagos. Includes pictures, a slide show, fact sheets, specific articles, and a timeline. Concentrates mainly on the preservation and conservation of the islands.

(*denotes "youth-friendly")





 

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