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E. E. BARNARD
E. E. BARNARD
USA (1857 - 1923)
Best known for his discovery of Barnard's star in 1916, Edward Emerson Barnard was a gifted astronomer who grew up with little formal education. In 1876, he purchased his first telescope, a 5-inch refractor and discovered his first comet in 1881. In 1892, he discovered Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter, making him the first to discover a new Jovian moon since Galileo in 1609. After joining Yerkes Observatory at the University of Chicago in 1895, Barnard spent great amounts of time photographing the Milky Way. Posthumously, his photographs were published in 1927 as A Photographic Atlas of Selected Regions of the Milky Way.
 

Enjoy these insightful and educational video clips drawn from over 70 hours of interviews with the world's leading figures in astronomy, shot during the filming of 400 Years of the Telescope.

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Suvi Gezari

The Golden Age of astronomy
Suvi Gezari - John Hopkins University

In this Golden Age of astronomy, when you’re trying to investigate a problem, you don’t have to just go about it with one telescope or in one wavelength region of light. You can use a whole array of telescopes and really study the problem from many different angles.

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Suvi Gezari

Ground versus space-based telescopes
Suvi Gezari - John Hopkins University

The age of ground based telescopes is not over, even though we have wonderful satellite telescopes that detect x-ray radiation and ultraviolet radiation.

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Suvi Gezari

How I became an astronomer
Suvi Gezari - John Hopkins University

I really got involved in astronomy research in college doing summer research programs and that’s when I really decided that I wanted to do astronomy as a profession.

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Suvi Gezari

Light spectra
Suvi Gezari - John Hopkins University

Light comes in a spectrum of energies and wavelengths.

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Suvi Gezari

Alternative techniques of studying distant black holes
Suvi Gezari - John Hopkins University

So what about all the other super massive black holes that are sitting there? How can we figure out how big they are and how they’re affecting the rest of the galaxy if they’re not producing any radiation from swallowing gas?

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