1. Breedlove Guitar, Guitar Builders

Source: Oregon Public Broadcasting: Art Beat at School

Examine the processes, craftsmanship and art of making a high-quality acoustic guitar. Consider environmental issues such as logging and conservation that affect both the availability of materials and the final cost of the instrument.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Careers. Economics. Geography. Music.

Resource Type: Video

2. Cal Scott, Composer

Source: Oregon Public Broadcasting: Art Beat at School

Discover the role of the score in a film's emotional impact on the viewer. Consider how the composer uses a combination of art and math to precisely meld the music to an edited video.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Careers. Creative Thinking. Film. Music.

Resource Type: Video

3. Dave Carter, Musician/Songwriter

Source: Oregon Public Broadcasting: Art Beat at School

Watch late singer-songwriter Dave Carter, who died in 2002, performing with his partner Tracy Grammer at the Sisters Folk Festival. Learn how he felt about his songwriting art.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Reading & Language Arts, The Arts

Topics: Creative Thinking. Poetry and Poets. Music.

Resource Type: Video

4. Eyes on the Prize: Burn, Baby, Burn

Source: American Experience

Analyze the lyrics of Jimmy Collier's song, "Burn, Baby, Burn", in order to understand the mindset of African Americans during the Watts riots of 1965. Consider how this song differs from the songs that were sung during non-violent protests.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies. United States History: 1945-early 1970s. Music.

Resource Type: Video

5. Eyes on the Prize: Everybody's Got a Right to Live

Source: American Experience

Analyze a song made popular during the Civil Rights Movement. Compare the lyrics to a related song, Hollis Watkins' "Oh Freedom."

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies. United States History: 1945-early 1970s. Music.

Resource Type: Video

6. Eyes on the Prize: Governor Wallace

Source: American Experience

Analyze the lyrics to "Governor Wallace" and learn how African Americans reacted to the assault of peaceful marchers outside Selma, Alabama.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies. United States History: 1945-early 1970s. Music.

Resource Type: Video

7. Eyes on the Prize: Waist Deep in the Big Muddy

Source: American Experience

Listen to a clip of an anti-war song written and performed by folk singer Pete Seeger. Explain how the song serves as an allegory for American intervention in southeast Asia.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Civics: Civil and Human Rights. United States History: 1945-early 1970s. Music.

Resource Type: Video

8. Eyes on the Prize: We Are Soldiers in the Army

Source: American Experience

Review a song often heard during meetings of the Montgomery Improvement Association's rallies to unite protesters participating in the bus boycott in that Alabama town.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies. United States History: 1945-early 1970s. Music.

Resource Type: Video

9. Eyes on the Prize: We Shall Overcome

Source: American Experience

Listen to a song at the March on Washington by legendary gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Explain how the song had been used throughout history, and how Pete Seeger and others changed the lyrics to fit this particular event.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Civics: Civil and Human Rights. Cultural Studies: African American Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

10. Eyes on the Prize: Which Side Are You On?

Source: American Experience

Review a clip of this song, originally written for striking Kentucky coal minors, and explain how the new lyrics were directed toward two groups: sympathetic whites and middle-class blacks who might be afraid to support the movement publicly.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Civics: Civil and Human Rights. Cultural Studies: African American Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

11. Eyes on the Prize: You Better Leave Segregation Alone

Source: American Experience

Review this clip of a protest song that made a big impact on public opinion. Explain how the selection of the popular rock and roll tune, combined with the lyrics, turned the tables on pro-segregationist whites.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Civics: Civil and Human Rights. Cultural Studies: African American Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

12. Eyes on the Prize: Your Dog Loves My Dog

Source: American Experience

Review the songwriter's description and listen to a clip of a song from the Civil Rights Movement that questions segregation from a child's point of view.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies. Sociology. Music.

Resource Type: Video

13. HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes - Gender Violence

Source: Independent Lens

Consider the effect of rap music's portrayals of women, in both lyrics and music videos, on the way African-American women are treated in society.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: Health & Fitness, The Arts

Topics: Human Sexuality. Social Skills. Creative Thinking. Media Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

14. HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes - Homophobia

Source: Independent Lens

Examine the homophobic nature of rap music lyrics and how they perpetuate violence and intolerance. Learn about the hidden issue of homoeroticism in hip-hop culture.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: Health & Fitness, The Arts

Topics: Human Sexuality. Social Skills. Critical Thinking Skills. Media Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

15. HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes - Masculinity

Source: Independent Lens

Consider the culture and message of rap music and how it portrays African-American men and boys as domineering, aggressive and violent. Determine the consequences of perpetuating this stereotype.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: Health & Fitness, The Arts

Topics: Mental/Emotional Health. Social Skills. Critical Thinking Skills. Media Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

16. HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes - Media Literacy

Source: Independent Lens

Discover how the consolidation of the recording industry led to megacompanies that influence rap music through "formulas" for mass appeal, promoting imagery that shocks, is violent and/or sexualizes women.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: The Arts

Topics: Critical Thinking Skills. Media Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video

17. Poetry Series: Joy Harjo

Source: Online NewsHour

Watch Joy Harjo, an internationally-known poet, writer and musician, perform some of her new poetic forms. Consider how Harjo combines her poetry and writing with music, both vocally and through her saxophone.

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12

Subjects: Reading & Language Arts, The Arts

Topics: Poetry and Poets. Music.

Resource Type: Video

18. The Way the Music Died

Source: Frontline

Trace of the history of the recording industry from its post-Woodstock heyday to the mass layoffs and bankruptcy in 2004. Discover how industry-wide consolidation, Internet theft and artistic drought have threatened the music industry.

Grade Level: 9-12

Subjects: Social Studies, The Arts

Topics: Civics: Current Events/Issues. Economics. Media Studies. Music.

Resource Type: Video