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recommended books archive

(Mis) Behavior of Markets: A Fractal View of Risk, Ruin, and Reward, The

Authored By: Benoit Mandelbrot and Richard L. Hudson

Published: August 2004

Financial markets are even riskier than past theory predicts. Mathematician Mandelbrot employs fractal models to understand stock prices, commodities trading, and currency exchange rates. He assesses the old theory, describes the new, and looks to the future.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

1, 2, 3, Go!

Authored By: Huy Voun Lee

Published: January 2001

Although China has many different spoken dialects, its written language is standard. This book introduces some of the simpler picture-words based on actions using the hands and feet. Each two-page spread features a phrase in English and Chinese writing and a cut-paper collage resembling a block print. The numbers 1-10 and the verb "go" are also included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

1, 2, I Love You

Authored By: Alice Schertle and Emily Arnold McCully

Published: June 2004

Count from one to ten and back again in this playful rhyming picture book. McCully’s illustrations supply humor and interest. Readers and listeners can search for a pair of tagalong mice on each page.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

10 Little Rubber Ducks

Authored By: Eric Carle

Published: February 2005

A box of ten rubber ducks is washed overboard in a storm. One by one they drift apart until the last finds companionship with a real mother duck and her nine ducklings. Children can count, meet common ocean animals, learn the cardinal points of the compass, and make the rubber duck squeak.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

100th Day Worries

Authored By: Margery Cuyler and Arthur Howard

Published: January 2000

Jessica is a worrier. She worries about losing her first tooth, missing the school bus, and getting her math right. When her teacher asks each student to bring in a collection of 100 objects on the 100th day of school, she worries about what to bring in. Children 4-8 will learn different ways of counting to 100 as Jessica's classmates bring in their collections and just might recognize the solution to her problem before she does.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

365 Penguins

Authored By: Jean-Luc Fromental and Joëlle Jolivet

Published: November 2006

On the first of the year, a box with a penguin is delivered. Inside is a note: “I’m number 1. Feed me when I’m hungry.” The pattern is well established by the end of the week with the arrival of number 7. Who is sending the penguins, and why? You’ll discover the identity of the sender and the reason why he’s mailing penguins at year’s end. In the meantime, you’ll have fun calculating penguin totals and seeing how they can be arranged in easily counted groups. The surprise ending promises an unbearable New Year.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

50 Problem-Solving Lessons: The Best from 10 Years of Math Solutions Newsletters

Authored By: Marilyn Burns

Published: 2003

The lessons gathered in this resource were chosen from the author’s Math Solutions Newsletter. Math teachers can find lessons in number, geometry, measurement, statistics, probability, algebra, logic, and patterns and functions. The book includes grade level and strand charts and black line masters.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

501 Challenging Logic and Reasoning Problems, 2nd Edition

Authored By: LearningExpress

Published: January 2006

Here’s a good way to sharpen your critical thinking skills. This book presents 37 sets of questions covering number series, analogies, logic problems, logic games, analyzing arguments, and more. The book is designed to be used independently or in the classroom. The answers and explanations are grouped at the end of the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

57 Great Math Stories and the Problems They Represent

Authored By: Debbie Haver

Published: January 1998

Young adult readers will love these engaging, brain-teasing math problems and will strengthen their math skills as they puzzle through to the solutions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

7 X 9 = Trouble!

Authored By: Claudia Mills and G. Brian Karas

Published: April 2002

Wilson Williams is having trouble learning his times tables. He wishes he were smarter. His parents try to help, but practicing isn’t as much fun as playing. When he fails his 3s again, Wilson’s teacher sends home a note, and Wilson can only see weeks of trouble ahead.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Abel's Proof: An Essay on the Sources and Meaning of Mathematical Unsolvability

Authored By: Peter Pesic

Published: June 2003

Niels Hendrik Abel was twenty-one in 1824 when he published a pamphlet which proved that fifth order algebraic equations are not solvable in radicals. At the time, his paper was largely ignored, and Abel died five years later, just before his work began to attract attention. His insights have since become a cornerstone of modern mathematics. This is a book of mathematical ideas reaching back to the Ancient Greeks. It highlights mathematical details in boxes and includes an annotated translation of Abel’s proof.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Across the Board: The Mathematics of Chessboard Problems

Authored By: John J. Watkins

Published: April 2004

The author presents all the well-known chessboard problems in a manner accessible to those not necessarily versed in math or chess. Chapters treat the Knight’s Tour, Queen’s Domination, three dimensional chessboards, Eulerian squares, and Polyminoes. Each chapter includes problems and solutions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Actual Size

Authored By: Steve Jenkins

Published: May 2004

How big is giant squid? How small is a pygmy shrew? Sometimes numbers aren’t enough to make size clear. Jenkins’s cut and torn paper collages are one and two page illustrations of animals, or in the case of the very very big, parts of animals. Opening this book to the double-page full-size Goliath Birdeater Tarantula (12 inches across) might cause you to reach for something larger than a flyswatter.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Adam Spencer's Book of Numbers

Authored By: Adam Spencer

Published: January 2004

In one hundred chapters of no more than two pages, the author who has a PhD in mathematics and works as a stand-up comedian and DJ in Australia takes the “numb out of numbers.” Each engaging chapter from 1 to 100 is filled with factoids, interesting observations, and humor. Some discretion is advised with younger students.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Africa Counts : Number and Pattern in African Culture

Authored By: Claudia Zaslavsky

Published: May 1999

Zalavsky's account of the diverse mathematical systems of Saharan African cultures includes counting in words and in gestures; measuring time, distance, weight, and other quantities; patterns in music, poetry, art, and architecture; number magic and taboos, and much more.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Albert Einstein: A Life of Genius

Authored By: Elizabeth MacLeod

Published: March 2003

"It's not that I' so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer," said Einstein. OK, he was smart too, but persistence is an essential characteristic in those who persue mathematics and science. This brief biography features many photos and illustrations and includes a timeline.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

All in One Hour

Authored By: Susan Stevens Crummel and Dorothy Donohue

Published: September 2003

What can happen in one hour? Start with a mouse and a cat at 6 A.M. and see. That’s what Crummel and Donohue have done in this wonderful cut paper collage odyssey. Each two-page spread follows the action at irregular increments of time through the hour and ends on a note suggesting the adventures will soon start again.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Alphabet Explosion!: Search and Count from Alien to Zebra

Authored By: John Nickle

Published: September 2006

Each letter's page pictures a number of things beginning with the letter. As the author explains, a “thing” can be an object, action, or color. Consult “How to Play” for other fine points on what to count and what not to count. The pictures will keep you counting and recounting. The author’s answers are given at the end, but even he expresses some uncertainty. If you find more, he’s provided an email address.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Amazing Pop-Up Multiplication Book

Authored By: Kate Petty and Jennie Maizels

Published: September 1998

The authors who brought you the highly acclaimed Amazing Pop-Up Grammar Book have done it again! Readers in grades 3-6 will love the elaborate illustrations that slide and pop-up to reveal math questions and answers. The book is organized by the numbers 1-10; each number provides practice on a specific part of the multiplication table through scenarios like Noah's Ark, finding clothes in drawers and closets, and much more.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar

Authored By: Masaichiro Anno and Mitsumasa Anno

Published: March 1999

Inside a richly illustrated, mysterious jar is water, which becomes the sea; inside the sea, readers age 4-8 discover an island, and so on until the concept of factorials is elegantly and invitingly explained and readers have counted to 3,628,800.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Annotated Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, The

Authored By: Edwin A. Abbott and Ian Stewart, editor

Published: December 2001

Originally published in 1884, Flatland tells the story of A. Square, a plane figure, taken to a land of three dimensions. Stewart, a mathematics professor, has annotated this math classic, revealing much of the history and science underlying Abbott’s book, subjects as diverse as phrenology, ancient Babylon, Karl Marx, the Gregorian calendar, and the mathematician George Boole. Ample margins provide details, references, and explanatory drawings. The book ends with an essay on the fourth dimension in mathematics and bibliographies of Abbott and Charles Howard Hinton.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Apple Fractions

Authored By: Jerry Pallotta and Rob Bolster

Published: October 2002

Pallotta has written a number of math books using candy to illustrate concepts. In this book he uses apples, which should please dentists, to explain fractions. Bolster's elves divide realistic McIntoshes, Galas, and Cortlands into equal parts to feed two, three, and four persons, then other fruit related props like bees, pears, and glasses of juice to demonstrate other fractions, numerators, denominators, and improper fractions. As always, humor helps make ideas clear as well as add fun.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Are You As Smart As You Think? 150 Original Mathematical, Logical, and Spatial-Visual Puzzles for All Levels of Puzzle Solvers

Authored By: Terry Stickels

Published: March 2000

This is just the book for the whole family on that long car trip or flight. Divided in two sections, the first has 75 warm-up puzzles and the second 75 killers. Each section is followed by answers and explanations for approaching the problems. Open the book and watch time fly. Some puzzles require pencil and paper.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Arithme-Tickle: An Even Number of Odd Riddle-Rhymes

Authored By: J. Patrick Lewis and Frank Remkiewicz

Published: April 2002

Kids will have fun using basic math skills to solve the eighteen riddles in this picture book. Skills exercised include addition, subtraction, time, speed, measurement, multiplication, and common sense.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Art of the Infinite: The Pleasures of Mathematics, The

Authored By: Robert Kaplan and Ellen Kaplan

Published: March 2003

This readable discussion traces the concept of infinity from Pythagoras to Descarte to Leibnitz to Cantor and other less familiar mathematical figures. The text is accompanied by many charts, graphs, drawings. A generous appendix presents the mathematics in greater detail.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Artist and the Mathematician: The Story of Nicolas Bourbaki, the Genius Mathematician Who Never Existed, The

Authored By: Amir D. Aczel

Published: August 2006

This is one of those stories that puts a human face on mathematics. Nicholas Bourbaki was not one but initially six mathematicians. He was born in a Paris café in 1934. The six mathematicians and the others who followed published in his name-- inventing the man, his family, and artifacts like calling cards and wedding invitations to his daughter’s wedding. It was an elaborate hoax, but one that produced world-class mathematics. Bourbaki’s work has influenced all mathematicians working today.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Aunts Go Marching, The

Authored By: Maurie J. Manning

Published: April 2003

This variation on a familiar song lets children count umbrella-toting aunts in ranks of one to ten as they slosh through the rain to the beat of a drummer girl. When thunder booms, they all race home. Manning’s illustrations include interesting details, diversity of characters, and humor.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Barn Cat: A Counting Book

Authored By: Carol P. Saul

Published: September 1998

Saul helps very young readers learn to count with this fun barnyard tale. The barn cat is joined by different farm animals in a counting story richly illustrated with woodcuts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Baseball Prospectus 2004: Statistics, Analysis and Insight for the Information Age

Authored By: The Baseball Prospectus Team of Experts

Published: February 2004

If you like baseball and statistics, you’re in luck. This city phone book size tome includes player stats and performance analysis for more than 1600 National and American league players. It includes best and worst catchers and the top 50 prospects.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Bed Hogs

Authored By: Kelly S. DiPucchio and Howard Fine

Published: May 2004

Little Runt shares an itchy bed of straw in Sooey, South Dakota with five other family members. Little Runt is squashed and unhappy so he eliminates one bed hog after another. Kids count backward from six to one. This humorous tale of subtraction is told in verse.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Best of All Possible Worlds: Mathematics and Destiny, The

Authored By: Ivar Ekeland

Published: October 2006

The French Mathematician Maupertuis argued that everything in nature happens in a way that requires the least possible action. His least action principle or the concept of optimization has influenced mathematics, biology, economics, and politics. The author traces how optimization led to great intellectual breakthroughs.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Best of Times: Math Strategies That Multiply, The

Authored By: Greg Tang and Harry Briggs

Published: September 2002

Rote memorization of the multiplication tables isn't the only way to conquer multiplication. In this approach, Tang shows how to combine what you do know to arrive at what you don't know. Instead of memorizing, for example, 7x5=35, think of 7x5 as being half 7x10. The book's final pages include the times tables and Tang's rules restated.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Big Brain Workout, The

Authored By: Jack Botermans and Heleen Tichler

Published: June 2005

Puzzles are a good way to clear the cobwebs from your brain. Einstein used to solve them. This collection of more than 200 exercises covers logical and numerical puzzles, tangrams, sequencing, estimation, and magic squares as well as lateral thinking, optical illusions, and letter puzzles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Big Issues: The Examined Life in a Digital Age

Authored By: Editors of Forbes ASAP

Published: September 2001

Forbes ASAP is a bimonthly technology magazine. Big Issues is a collection of 66 essays from the first five years, examining the impact of digital technology on society, culture, and individuals. Writers encountered are as diverse as Muhammad Ali and Bill Gates, John Updike and Chuck Yeager. This is probably best used as a source book for teachers, as some of the issues are controversial.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Book of Go, The

Authored By: William S. Cobb

Published: May 2002

The modern game of Go is played on a board with 19x19 lines (361 points) with 181 black and 180 white stones. Although often associated with Japan, the game of Go originated in China at least before A.D. 200. The rules to Go are simple, but it is one of those games of strategy that is harder to master than its rules first suggest. This spiral-bound introduction teaches a simplified version of the game in which the first person to capture an opponent's marker wins before presenting the full game. The book comes with 9x9 and 13x13 boards and pieces to play.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Brain-Flexing IQ Tests

Authored By: Fraser Simpson and Kimble Pendleton Mead

Published: October 2002

Challenge your brain with the twenty-one tests gathered in this spiral-bound book. Each test has fifteen questions involving anagrams, analogies, cryptograms, logic, mathematics, mazes, sequences, words, and more. The answers follow each test. An index makes it easy to find specific questions and puzzle types.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Brainstrains: Eye-Popping Puzzles

Authored By: Peter De Schepper, Frank Coussement, and Keith Kay

Published: April 2004

Test your puzzler with this generous collection of brightly colored visual and number teasers. Stumped? A yellow section provides tips for arriving at a solution. Answers are in the final lavender section. Included is a section of optical illustions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculated Risks: How To Know When Numbers Deceive You

Authored By: Gerd Gigerenzer

Published: June 2002

Certainty has become a commodity marketed by the medical industry, insurance companies, investment advisors, and election campaigns. Certainty is an illusion. Even DNA evidence can produce false matches. We don’t understand this because we haven’t learned statistical thinking, a handicap that hobbles doctors and lawyers as well as anyone else. This book will help you understand uncertainty and the real world.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculus Demystified: A Self Teaching Guide

Authored By: Steven G. Krantz

Published: August 2002

Sometimes all a student needs is to see a problem from a different angle to make sense of it. This book provides plenty of supplementary views in calculus. Chapters provide the foundations of calculus, applications of the derivative, the integral, indeterminate forms, transcendental functions, methods of integration, and applications of the integral. Solutions to the chapter exercises and a final exam are included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculus for Cats

Authored By: Kenn Amdahl and Jim Loats

Published: September 2001

This brief book will not replace a calculus textbook but will provide additional explanation of concepts if read before or while using one. Readers will find no exercises. They will find verbal discussions of basic ideas, vocabulary, differential calculus, and integral calculus. Humor and vivid imagery make this a useful text for anyone with doubts about their understanding of calculus.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculus Gallery: Masterpieces from Newton to Lebesgue, The

Authored By: William Dunham

Published: January 2005

Dunham examines in 14 concise chapters some of the mathematicians and theorems that have contributed to the development of calculus. The author warns that this is not a book for the mathematically faint-hearted.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculus Lifesaver: All the Tools You Need to Excel at Calculus, The

Authored By: Adrian Banner

Published: March 2007

This 700+ page resource was developed for motivated students who want to improve their understanding of calculus. It can be used as a companion to any single-variable textbook. It has 475 examples from easy to hard and emphasizes improving problem solving skills.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Calculus Wars: Newton, Leibniz, and the Greatest Mathematical Clash of All Time, The

Authored By: Jason Socrates Bardi

Published: April 2006

Reluctant to publish his calculus, Newton circulated his ideas privately for ten years until Leibniz published his own. If you think mathematicians are always rational, this look at the ten year feud over priority between two giants will open your eyes.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Can You Count Ten Toes?: Count to 10 in 10 Different Languages

Authored By: Lezlie Evans

Published: November 2004

Originally published in 1999 and now available in paperback, this counting book encourages children to count objects in Japanese, Russian, Korean, Hindi, Hebrew, Chinese, French, Tagalog, Spanish, and Zulu. Pronunciation help is provided. A world map shows where each language is spoken.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Can You Count to a Googol?

Authored By: Robert E. Wells

Published: March 2000

If you had as much money as Bill Gates in dollar bills, how much room would you need to store it? What if you owed $5.7 trillion? (U.S. national debt). This picture book for children 4-8 provides comprehensible images of smaller numbers and builds with them to provide memorable images of really big numbers. What about a googol? If you counted all the atoms in the universe, you still wouldn't reach a googol.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Can You See What I See?: Picture Puzzles to Search and Solve

Authored By: Walter Wick

Published: March 2002

Counting, number sense, shape recognition, puzzles, mazes, matching - many of the elements of mathematics are present in this collection of complex and intriguing picture puzzles constructed from familiar or once familiar toys. Even after you have found what you are looking for, you will continue to search. This would make a great addition to a math activities table.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Math

Authored By: Diane Lindsey Reeves and Nancy Bond

Published: April 2000

If you are 9-12 and like doing math, you will want to read this book. Learn about fifteen math-grounded careers, from actuarial work to urban planning. Each entry gives a general description of an occupation, lists related websites, and provides a profile of someone who actually does the work. You will also find a list of other careers in science, health, aviation, and more, all requiring some proficiency in math. A planning section helps you work toward your dream career.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Cat Count

Authored By: Betsy Lewin

Published: April 2003

This is a colorized reissue of a book first published in 1981. Fun rhymes and fun cats of every stripe, spot, and color make a Lewin’s counting book (from 1-60) a perfect read aloud for primary students.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Chance: A Guide to Gambling, Love, the Stock Market and Just About Everything Else

Authored By: Amir D. Aczel

Published: October 2004

The study of probability is an attempt to understand uncertainty, the likelihood of some random event. Aczel relates the development of probability theory from Galileo, Pascal, fermat, and Moivre in a manner accessible to the general reader. He includes a section of problems for readers to test their understanding. An appendix by Brad Johnson applies theory to games of chance.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Chances Are . . .: Adventures in Probability

Authored By: Michael Kaplan and Ellen Kaplan

Published: March 2006

Probability and statistics are tools for understanding the recurrent but unpredictable. This account of the twin disciplines traces their development form the Romans to the present. The Kaplans examine chance in gambling, insurance, normality, medicine, justice, prediction, war, and being.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Chases and Escapes: The Mathematics of Pursuit and Evasion

Authored By: Paul J. Nahin

Published: July 2007

Childhood chase games like tag, dodgeball, and hide-and-seek are an application of pursuit theory with the same principles at work as in military strategy. Nahin has written the first history of this area of mathematics, tracing modern pursuit theory from its classical beginnings to the present day and drawing on game theory, geometry, linear algebra, target-tracking algorithms, and more. He provides problems and solutions and computer programs for the really ambitious student.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Chicka Chicka 1, 2, 3

Authored By: Bill Martin Jr, Michael Sampson, and Lois Ehlert

Published: August 2004

Numbers climb an apple tree. Count from 1 to 20 by ones, then to 90 by tens. The numbers stop at 99 when set upon by angry bumblebees but brave 0 finally joins 10 at the top of the tree to make 100. Rhyme and Ehlert’s colorful illustrations make this an especially appealing book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Chuck Murphy's Bow Wow: A Pop-Up Book of Shapes

Authored By: Chuck Murphy

Published: July 1999

Very young readers will enjoy the brightly illustrated pop-up scenes in five spreads; this is a solid sequel to Murphy's earlier works, including One to Ten Pop-Up Surprises! and Black Cat, White Cat: A Pop-Up Book of Opposites.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

City 1 2 3

Authored By: Zoran Milich

Published: March 2005

Children explore the city and count 1 boy, 2 yellow cabs, 3 truck wheels, up to 10 French fries on a plate. Opposite each photograph are the numbers 1-10, a highlighted numeral, dots for children to count, and the number spelled.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Cleo's Counting Book

Authored By: Stella Blackstone and Caroline Mockford

Published: June 2003

Cleo is an orange kitten. Kids can count things that would interest a kitten: puppies, birds, trees, and more. Count from one to ten and back down to one. Mockford's bold bright illustrations will engage young and old.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Click, Clack, Splish, Splash: A Counting Adventure

Authored By: Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin

Published: January 2006

What are the farm animals up to as they sneak past one sleeping farmer? The four chickens, five cows, and six goats must have something in mind. The mystery is solved when they pour the farmer’s ten goldfish in the pond.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

CliffsNotes Parent's Crash Course Elementary School Math

Authored By: David Alan Herzog

Published: September 2005

When math teachers assign homework, they often assume a parent can help if the going gets rough. But many parents need a refresher, even with elementary math. That is the purpose of this book. Math teachers and parents can help each other help their students with these 58 lessons covering whole numbers, fractions, geometry, measurement, averages, integers, and exponents.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Codes and Ciphers

Authored By: Sean Callery

Published: January 2008

Callery covers the history of codes and ciphers from hieroglyphics to cyberspace. He looks at code-breaking devices, Native American smoke signals, flags and semaphore, Braille, Morse code, and mono- and polyalphabetic letter substitution. The book features sidebars, many illustrations, a glossary, and recommendations for further reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Coin Counting Book, The

Authored By: Rozanne Lanczak Williams

Published: February 2001

Count pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars and dollars. Determine all the ways to make 10 cents, 25 cents, 50 cents, and so on. This picture book is a great introduction to money, counting, simple addition, and problem solving.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Coincidences, Chaos, and All That Math Jazz: Making Light of Weighty Ideas

Authored By: Edward B. Burger and Michael Starbird

Published: August 2005

For reluctant math students discovering how mathematics underlies the universe can be the first step to a new appreciation. Could monkeys really type Hamlet? How many handshakes separate you and Thomas Jefferson? Could you take off your underpants without taking off your pants? Probability, number theory, topology, and more are presented in an accessible and enlightening manner.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Colorful Illusions: Tricks to Fool Your Eyes

Authored By: Aki Nurosi and Mark Shulman

Published: September 2000

Take a look at the tricks colors in relation to other colors can play on our perception. This book suitable for K-12 students includes a general discussion on colors and illusion, twenty-five illusions and their explanations, four rules explaining how your brain sees things, and a glossary.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Colossal Book of Mathematics: Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems, The

Authored By: Martin Gardner

Published: September 2001

This is the best of Martin Gardner’s column “Mathematical Games,” which ran for twenty-five years in Scientific American. The book is divided into twelve sections: arithmetic and algebra, plane geometry, solid geometry and higher dimension, symmetry, topology, probability, infinity, combinatories, games and decision theory, physics, logic and philosophy, and miscellaneous - making this a 700+ page ultrasaurus of recreational math.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Colossal Book of Short Puzzles and Problems, The

Authored By: Martin Gardner

Published: November 2005

Gardner has collected 340 short recreational math puzzles from 25 years of “Mathematical Games,” his column for Scientific American. You’ll find puzzles in combinatorics, probability, algebra, geometry, topology, chess, logic, cryptarithms, wordplay, and physics. The puzzles are grouped by subject and progress from the easiest to the hardest.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Conned Again, Watson! Cautionary Tales of Logic, Math, and Probability

Authored By: Colin Bruce

Published: January 2002

Reliance on common sense is dangerous. Ignorance of math is worse. In twelve cases, Holmes uses probability, statistics, decision theory, and game theory to solve crimes. The math and logic in each case is kept at an every day level, but an afterward suggests further reading for continued investigation.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Constants of Nature: From Alpha to Omega--the Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe, The

Authored By: John Barrow

Published: January 2003

Change is the norm, but there are some things that remain constant. This book looks at some of the lasting things, scientific mysteries that challenge physicists. Why, for example, do all electrons behave alike? Barrow is a professor of mathematical sciences at the University of Cambridge. In this book, he explores at the numbers and values that set reality, the strength of gravity, speed of light, and masses of elementary particles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Count Down: Six Kids Vie for Glory at the World's Toughest Math Competition

Authored By: Steve Olson

Published: April 2004

From a half million who compete for the honor, six teens are selected to represent the U.S. at the International mathematical Olympiad. The author reveals the personalities of six remarkable problem solvers in a recent Olympiad. An appendix explains the mathematics employed in solving the contest’s six problems.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Counting Caterpillars and Other Math Poems

Authored By: Betsy Franco

Published: October 1998

Rhyming makes counting cool in this fun book for readers K-3.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Counting Cows

Authored By: Woody Jackson

Published: August 1999

Kids learn to count down from ten to zero as Jackson's cows prepare themselves for a barn dance. Bright illustrations and whimsical description make this counting book a treat.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Counting in the Garden

Authored By: Kim Parker

Published: April 2005

Find and count from one to ten floral decorated animals in a garden of bright flowers. The search for the disguised creatures adds an element of fun.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Counting Kisses

Authored By: Karen Katz

Published: January 2001

How many kisses does it take to say goodnight? Count and find out. Everyone pitches in and kisses baby at naptime from Grandma to the dog and cat.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Cubes, Cones, Cylinders, & Spheres

Authored By: Tana Hoban

Published: October 2000

A child's world is full of marvelous shapes. In her latest collection of color photographs without words, Hoban focuses on four solids and shows just how common they are.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Curious Minds: How a Child Becomes a Scientist

Authored By: John Brockman

Published: August 2004

Ray Kurweil traces his belief that inventions can change the world for the better to his reading of Tom Swift, Jr. For Paul Davies, theoretical physics was always his quest, even when his family thought he was nuts. Janna Levin, physicist and astronomer, remembers looking out her bedroom window at the night sky and wondering how far she was seeing. Mathematician Steven Strogatz describes an experiment with a pendulum that made clear to him the order in the universe and the importance of knowing mathematics. Steven Pinker, a psychologist, thinks tracing influences is a waste of time. Twenty-seven men and women explain their journeys into science, invention, and mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Daisy 1, 2, 3

Authored By: Peter Catalanotto

Published: November 2003

Miss Tuttle has twenty Dalmatians in her obedience class, all named Daisy. How can she tell them apart? Each has a distinguishing characteristic, skill, or possession. Kids count from one to twenty.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dark Hero of the Information Age: In Search of Norbert Wiener the Father of Cybernetics

Authored By: Flo Conway and Jim Siegelman

Published: December 2004

Wiener entered college at eleven and earned his Ph. D at eighteen. He is considered the father of the Information Age. He coined the terms “cybernetics” and “feedback.” He had a long tenure at MIT. Yet he is largely forgotten. This biography traces the career and contributions of a mathematician who influenced John von Neumann, Claude Shannon, Margaret Mead, Gregory Bateson, and Walter Reuther.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Doctor Ecco’s Cyberpuzzles: 36 Puzzles for Hackers and Other Mathematical

Authored By: Dennis E. Shasha

Published: July 2002

The author of Scientific American’s column, “Puzzling Adventures,” Shasha has collected cases organized around eight mathematical themes: design, combinatorial geometry, routing and networks, mathematical geography, scheduling, ciphers and secrecy, pattern mathematics, and games. Alternative approaches are suggested for cybernovices and cyberexperts. Solutions are furnished, though the best solutions are often still open.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dog's Colorful Day: A Messy Story about Colors and Counting

Authored By: Emma Dodd

Published: March 2001

Dog is white with one black spot on his left ear. At least that's the way he starts his day. Soon he starts collecting additional spots: jam red, paint blue, chocolate brown. By the time he gets back home he has ten different color spots. Young readers can practice counting and naming colors.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dogs, Dogs, Dogs!

Authored By: By Leslea Newman and Erika Oller

Published: June 2002

This rhyming picture book opens with one dog walking in the city, but as the title promises, he doesn’t stay alone for long. Count from one to ten and back to one as dogs enjoy a day in the city. Oller’s watercolors add humor that can be enjoyed by all ages.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Don't Believe Everything You Think: The 6 Basic Mistakes We Make in Thinking

Authored By: Thomas Kida

Published: May 2006

We often believe things because we want to believe them, not because there is any evidence. Using this observation as a starting point, the author examines six common mistakes in thinking, failures of logicn - preferring stories to statistics, failing to appreciate chance, and oversimplifying life to name half. Think of this book as a course in applied math as a life skill.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Double Eagle: The Epic Story of the World's Most Valuable Coin

Authored By: Alison Frankel

Published: May 2006

The Double eagle is a twenty-dollar gold coin commissioned by Theodore Roosevelt, designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and minted in 1933. It has been one of the most sought after coins in history—and against the law to own ever since Franklin D. Roosevelt took the U.S. off the gold standard in 1933. The only coins to survive were stolen. Some were recovered. Others disappeared. One reappeared in 1996. It was recently auctioned for $7.59 million. This book is a coin collecting and detective story to please everyone.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dr. Euler's Fabulous Formula: Cures Many Mathematical Ills

Authored By: Paul J. Nahin

Published: April 2006

Euler still inspires mathematicians after 250 years. The author looks at applications of complex numbers in pure and applied math and electronic technology. The applications are as varied as the analysis of the flight of birds in the wind, a cat’s pursuit of a mouse, a violin’s vibrating strings, and the development of speech scramblers.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dr. Math Gets You Ready for Algebra: Learning Pre-Algebra is Easy! Just Ask Dr. Math!

Authored By: Math Forum

Published: August 2003

This self-study book will help ease students from the concrete world of numbers to the abstract world of letters and symbols. Divided into five sections, the book examines fundamental operations, integers, real numbers, equations with variables, and algebra operations. This last section looks at word problems and real world applications.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dr. Math Introduces Geometry

Authored By: The Math Forum

Published: August 2004

Dr. Math has been answering questions on the Web for years. This print collection provides help for geometry students. Five chapters deal with two dimensional geometric figures, area and perimeter of two dimensional figures, circles and Pi, three dimensional geometric figures, and symmetry. An illustrated appendix of geometric figures and a glossary are included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Dream Machine: J.C.R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal, The

Authored By: M. Mitchell Waldrop

Published: August 2001

In the early 1960s when computers were largely perceived as huge threatening machines dependant on punch cards, J.C.R. Licklider saw something different. He was convinced computers would become not just super fast calculating machines but a way to empower users. Licklider envisioned a man-computer symbiosis, an intergalactic network, a global commons of the multinet. The Dream Machine covers the life of Licklider and the computer from WWII to the 1990s.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Duelling Idiots and Other Probability Puzzlers

Authored By: Paul J. Nahin

Published: July 2002

Published for the first time in paperback, this edition corrects errors included in the first edition. Nahin’s collection of twenty-one puzzles requires creative thinking about probability. The puzzles are posed in the first section, puzzles with intriguing titles like When idiots Duel, Who Pays for the Coffee, and the Blind Spider and the Fly. The solutions follow in the next section. Also included are sections on random number generators and MATLAB programs that simulate the puzzles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

E = mc2: A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation

Authored By: David Bodanis

Published: September 2000

Like all good biographers, Bodanis investigates his subject's ancestors, in this case the symbols used in Einstein's equation. He then traces its development; its career in the world, including the atomic bombs dropped on Japan; and what it may still reveal about our universe. Suitable for middle schoolers and older, this book features a lengthy appendix and notes section for serious students.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Einstein's Clocks, Poincare's Maps: Empires of Time

Authored By: Peter Galison

Published: August 2003

Einstein and Poincare set out to determine whether time was absolute or relative. Galison, professor of the history of science at Harvard University, tells of their efforts using recently uncovered photos, patents, and archives.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Einstein: Visionary Scientist

Authored By: John B. Severance

Published: October 1999

Although Einstein created the framework of modern physics, many prominent scientists once doubted his theories because they were too abstract to be easily understood and could not be verified in a laboratory. This biography for 9-12 year olds examines the man, his time, and his ideas.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Emily's First 100 Days of School

Authored By: Rosemary Wells

Published: May 2000

Each morning, says Emily's teacher, they will write a new number friend in their number books, and when they reach one hundred, each bring in one hundred things. No one believes they will ever reach one hundred. Children 4-8 will have fun counting objects and wondering what Emily will bring. This is a BIG book so don't try to read it in one sitting.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Equal Shmequal

Authored By: Virginia Kroll

Published: June 2005

Mouse and her friends debate the concept of equal as they try to choose sides for tug-of-war. This is a fun introduction to a big idea. An end note discusses different kinds of equality.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Equation that Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry, The

Authored By: Mario Livio

Published: September 2005

Symmetry is the concept that links science and art. This account of a difficult equation, the quintic equation, and the two mathematicians that discovered that it could not be solved by the usual methods, describes the beginnings of group theory. Livio introduces two brilliant and tragic figures: Niels Henrik Abel who died of tuberculosis at 26 and Evariste Galois who died in a duel at 20 as he shows how group theory explains the symmetry and order we encounter everyday.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Essential Atlas of Mathematics

Authored By: Parramon Studios

Published: October 2004

Mathematics is more than arithmetic. This illustrated atlas presents many of the real life applications of mathematics. Thirty-three sections cover number systems to fuzzy logic and chaos. The book features diagrams and explanatory sidebars.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Essential John Nash, The

Authored By: Harold W. Kuhn and Sylvia Nasar, Editors

Published: December 2001

An early recommendation simply stated of mathematician John Nash, “This man is a genius.” His early promise seemed lost when in 1959 at thirty he was diagnosed a paranoid schizophrenic. Amazingly after thirty years he recovered. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics for his work in the theory on non-cooperative games. This book is a compilation of Nash’s influential papers and essays by himself, a colleague, and his biographer. A photo essay is included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Euclid in the Rainforest: Discovering Universal Truth in Logic and Math

Authored By: Joseph Mazur

Published: October 2004

The foundation of science and mathematics is logic. Mazur investigates three types of logic: the classic logic of the Ancient Greeks, the logic of infinity, and the everyday logic of plausible reasoning. He illustrates how we determine something is true with anecdotes from the history of science and math, his thirty years of observing students, and his own adventures in exotic lands.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Euclid's Window: The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to Hyperspace

Authored By: Leonard Mlodinow

Published: April 2001

Take a short course in the five revolutions in geometry: Euclid, Descartes, Gauss, Einstein, and Witten. A former faculty member at the California Institute of Technology, Hollywood writer, educational software developer, and High Tech businessman, the author writes a lucid account of some very weird ideas.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Everyday Math for Everyday Life: A Handbook for When It Just Doesn't Add Up

Authored By: Mark Ryan

Published: December 2002

This book answers the perennial question: “When will I ever use this?” Written for math-phobic adults who are facing the necessity of brushing up their math skills, this book will provide plenty of examples of math in real world situations. The first section reviews math, the next three sections show math in action in money matters; in the kitchen and around the house; and shopping, weather, travel, and games.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity

Authored By: David Foster Wallace

Published: October 2003

Wallace explores the nature of a big idea from a fiction writer's perspective. Although the beauty of math and the concept of infinity are made accessible to readers with an average math background, the book is structured to give satisfaction to readers with stronger math backgrounds. More difficult information is identified as IYI: If You're Interested. He discusses the contributions of Plato, Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Karl Weierstrass, Richard Dedekind, and Georg Cantor. A list of abbreviations is provided.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Everything Kids' Money Book (Everything Kids'), The

Authored By: Diane Mayr

Published: May 2000

If you want to understand why your dad and mom care if the Fed raises the prime interest rate, this book is for you. Separate chapters examine the history of money, coins and paper money in the U.S., banking, the Fed, the Euro, and investing. THe pages of this guide for readers 9-12 are filled fun facts, advice, activities and games.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Explaining the Universe: The New Age of Physics

Authored By: John M. Charap

Published: September 2002

Professor of Theoretical Physics, Charap translates difficult mathematical ideas into terms understandable to a general readership. He reviews the 20th century’s transformation of physics, and then presents the latest findings in particle physics, astrophysics, chaos theory, and cosmology. He examines missing matter, the big bang, and superstring theory.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Exploring Math With Books Kids Love

Authored By: Kathryn Kaczymarski

Published: November 1998

Kaczymarski's book is a manual for teachers interested in a creative, multidisciplinary approach to math instruction. The author uses familiar, popular children's books and stories as a springboard for math problems of all types.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Farm Life

Authored By: Elizabeth Spurr and Steve Bjorkman

Published: February 2003

Kids count from one to ten as they explore a farm. Rhyme and bright watercolors add to the fun. A glossary of farm terns is included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Fermat's Enigma

Authored By: Simon Singh

Published: September 1998

Just four years ago, Andrew Wiles of Princeton University solved a 350 year-old math problem: Fermat's last theorem. In a book that is part detective story, part testament to Wiles's determination, Simon Singh chronicles Wiles's dogged pursuit of the answer. Limericks and an appendix of math proofs are added pleasures to an already rich reading experience.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Feynman's Rainbow: A Search for Beauty in Physics and in Life

Authored By: Leonard Mlodinow

Published: May 2003

When the author arrived at Caltech in the early 1980s on a post-doctoral fellowship, he was tormented by self-doubt. He took his worries to Nobel Prize-winner Richard Feynman. This brief memoir explores the friendship of two physicists, one up-and-coming, the other established and dying. Understand there is more of the mathematician and scientist is this book than math and science.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Find Anthony Ant

Authored By: Lorna Philpot and Graham Philpot

Published: April 2006

Anthony Ant has embarked on a great explore. Young readers can follow Anthony through the maze of an ant hill. Part of the fun is finding Anthony. Visual clues are provided. Parental readers may need a magnifying glass. Each two page spread features a square of ants from1x1 to 10x10.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

First Shape Book

Authored By: Ann Montague-Smith and Mandy Stanley

Published: April 2002

Children become familiar with circles, triangles, squares, and rectangles and then search for them in every day contexts. The book includes tips for parents and a laminated poster.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Five Little Ducks

Authored By: Ivan Bates

Published: February 2006

This illustrated version of a familiar children’s song has poignancy and humor as five ducklings wander off one by one from their bewildered mother. Children count back from five to zero, until mother duck is finally reunited with her ducklings. Bates has individualized each duckling. A touch young children will appreciate.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Five More Golden Rules: Knots, Codes, Chaos and Other Great Theories of 20th-Century Mathematics

Authored By: John L. Casti

Published: March 2000

Intended for advanced math students, high school or older, this book explores five mathematical theories and explains how knot theory contributes to the development of new drugs, how coding theory makes mapping human DNA possible, and how control theory has affected space travel. You'll also learn about the personalities behind the mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Fly on the Ceiling: A Math Myth, The

Authored By: Julie Glass

Published: May 1998

Glass engages young readers with one of the most famous math myths, centered around geometry great Rene Descartes.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Follow the Line

Authored By: Laura Ljungkvist

Published: May 2006

Count your way from morning to night and from city to country across two-page spreads filled with details: flowers, antennas, freckles, headlights, traffic cones, tree stumps, fallen apples, stars, and a lot more.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Follow the Money!

Authored By: Loreen Leedy

Published: March 2002

Follow George, a quarter, from his stamping in the mint through his small adventures in finance. Each page provides opportunities to count and compute with money. Even the page numbers are stated in money. A final section gives more information about money and a glossary. The illustrations provide plenty of humor and interest.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Food For Thought

Authored By: Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers

Published: February 2005

Colors, shapes, opposites, and the numbers 1-10 are visualized in 77 fruits, vegetables, and spices. This colorful picture book provides a fun introduction to some basic kid knowledge.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Four Colors Suffice: How the Map Problem Was Solved

Authored By: Robin Wilson

Published: January 2003

It started in 1852 with a question from a former student. What is the least possible number of colors needed to fill in any map so that neighboring countries are always colored differently? For the next 150 years, thousands of problems solvers attempted to solve it. The author has written an entertaining account of the four color problem and its solution. He defines the problem, explains the main ideas of the proof, describes philosophical problems raised, and introduces related coloring problems, such as how many colors would you need if your map were printed on a doughnut? The book includes a timeline.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Fragments of Infinity: A Kaleidescope of Math and Art

Authored By: Ivars Peterson

Published: September 2001

Explore the region where mathematics and art meet. Filled with black and white and color illustrations, the book has chapters on subjects as diverse as plane folds in origami, grid fields and fractals, and crystals and tiling. You’ll meet artists who work with stone, computers and snow.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

From Zero to Infinity: What Makes Numbers Interesting

Authored By: Constance Reid

Published: February 2006

Every number has a story. This updated 50th Anniversary edition of a math classic reveals the stories of natural numbers 0-9 and reports on advances in number theory. It includes the proof of Fermat’s Last theorem. This look at mathematical history and lore can be appreciated by a general audience. Solutions for problems are grouped at each chapter’s end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Funny Cryptograms

Authored By: Shawn Kennedy

Published: May 2003

This collection of 370 cryptograms contains humorous quotes from celebrities like Johnny Carson, Stephen King, and Newt Gingrich. The introduction provides advice on how to approach cryptograms and two pages of hints. The answers conclude the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

G is for Googol: A Math Alphabet Book

Authored By: David Schwartz and Marissa Moss

Published: September 1998

This is a most unusual alphabet book for readers of all ages. Where else would you find "R is for rhombicosidodecahedron" or "T is for tessellate"? Each entry comes with detailed information about the topic and entertaining illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

G Is for One Gzonk!: An Alpha-Number-bet Book

Authored By: Tony DiTerlizzi

Published: September 2006

Diterlizzi has created a picture book combining the alphabet and numbers and a lot of eccentric fun with some of the weirdest creatures since Dr. Seuss. If you're not looking for logic, this is the perfect book for you. Kids will love its non-stop silliness.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Game Theory: A Very Short Introduction

Authored By: Ken Binmore

Published: November 2007

Game theory, a branch of applied mathematics, is the study of games when they are played rationally. To reach a larger audience, this brief introduction explains game theory without mathematical equations. An expert in the field, the author examines game theory in the sciences, particularly evolutionary biology, psychology, ethics, politics, and economics. The book contains many illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Geodesic Math and How to Use It

Authored By: Hugh Kenner

Published: October 2003

Geodesics are shell-like structures that employ interlocking triangles to hold themselves up without supporting columns. Kenner's classic manual for the construction of Buckminster Fuller's domes has been out of print since 1990. Divided into three sections, the book covers tensegrity and geodesics and provides data tables.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Geometric Patterns and How to Create Them

Authored By: Clarence P. Hornung

Published: May 2001

This collection of 164 simple geometric patterns was created with triangles, squares, rectangles, diamonds, cubes, hexagons, octagons, and basket weave. Each page has an original design and three variations created by coloring in different areas of the original pattern. These copyright-free designs can be used as they are or as a start in creating something completely new.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Geometry: A Self-Teaching Guide

Authored By: Steve Slavin and Ginny Crisonino

Published: September 2004

Here is a geometry primer the presents the basics in a clear manner for those frustrating moments when your textbook isn’t enough and it’s too late to call your teacher. Chapters cover triangles, circles, perimeter and area of two-dimensional polygons, volume and surface area of three-dimensional polygons, and conic sections. Each chapter opens with a pretest, and each chapter section ends with a self-test.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Give the Dog a Bone

Authored By: Steven Kellogg

Published: September 2000

In this counting book for children 4-8 based on the familiar nursery rhyme, Kellogg employs his trademark humor in providing a tangle of dogs, from pointers to spaniels, 250 in all. He even throws in velociraptors for good measure. The book includes a musical setting for the rhyme and a key to identify the dog breeds. Don't forget to count the bones.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

God Created the Integers: The Mathematical Breakthroughs That Changed History

Authored By: Stephen Hawking, Editor

Published: October 2005

Hawking has selected 31 landmarks of mathematics from basic geometry to transfinite numbers, from Euclid to Turing. This massive book includes biographies of 17 mathematicians and full proofs and explanations of the significance of their work. One shortcoming is that the book has no index.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

God's Equation: Einstein, Relativity, and the Expanding Universe

Authored By: Amir D. Aczel

Published: October 1999

In January 1998 when astronomers found evidence that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, the most promising theory to explain it was one Albert Einstein proposed and quickly retracted, considering it his greatest blunder. This book for high school students and older explores the latest developments in cosmology and reveals a previously unknown Einstein.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Godel: A Life of Logic

Authored By: John L. Casti and Werner DePauli

Published: August 2000

Godel's Incompleteness Theorem shattered hopes that logic would enable us to completely understand the universe. This biography for middle schoolers and older examines the life of a brilliant mathematician who was chosen by Time magazine as the greatest mathematician of the twentieth century and who was considered an intellectual peer by Einstein. His work revolutionized philosophy, linguistics, computer science, and cosmology.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Golden Ratio: The Story of Phi, the World's Most Astonishing Number, The

Authored By: Mario Livio

Published: October 2002

What do the arrangement of rose petals, a painting by Dali, and the spiral shells of mollusks have in common? This riddle is the starting point of a fascinating exploration of phi (1.6180339887499...), the Golden Mean. Roughly speaking, phi is a proportion. Not nearly as widely appreciated as pi, phi has entertained mathematicians such as Pythagoras, Fibonacci, Euclid, Kepler, and Roger Penrose, as well as biologists, artists, musicians, historians, architects, psychologists, and mystics. Much of nature, from the position of leaves on a stem to the structure of galaxies, can be explained by phi.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Golden Section: Nature's Greatest Secret, The

Authored By: Scott Olsen

Published: October 2006

The Golden Section is also known as the Golden Mean, Golden Ratio, and phi. It is defined as a line segment divided into two unequal parts, so that the ratio of the smaller to the larger is the same as the larger to the whole. This small, beautifully illustrated book reveals the Golden Section in nature, art, architecture, music, philosophy, science, and mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Grapes of Math, The

Authored By: Greg Tang and Harry Briggs

Published: February 2001

This picture book for children 8-12 provides entertainment while teaching problem solving skills. Each of sixteen problems is presented pictorially and verbally and is accompanied by a hint for solution. An appendix supplies the answers and reveals how the hint provides a quicker solution. See if you can come up with your own strategies.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Great Divide, The

Authored By: Dayle Ann Dodds and Tracy Mitchell

Published: November 1999

Eighty racers begin the Great Divide. Along the course, they encounter hazards, and the field of contestants is reduced by halves. Who will win? The outcome remains uncertain until the last moment. Readers 4-8 will become familiar with the concept of dividing in half and will love the verse and illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Great Estimations

Authored By: Bruce Goldstone

Published: August 2006

Learn to estimate in groups of 10, then take on groups of hundreds and thousands. The author presents "clump counting" and "box and count," using full-color photos of plastic bugs, dog and cat stamps, penguins, rice grains, jellybeans, and other things. The book includes more hints for estimation.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Great Feuds in Mathematics: Ten of the Liveliest Disputes Ever

Authored By: Hal Hellman

Published: September 2006

Mathematicians can be hotheads too as this book testifies. When Giralamo Cardano published The Rules of Algebra in 1545, he made mathematical history and an enemy of Tartaglia. Cardano had included a solution Tartaglia shared with him with the understanding he would not publish it until Tartaglia did. Cardano gave credit, but Tartaglia was not satisfied. The resulting feud ended with Cardano’s betrayal to the Spanish Inquisition 25 years later. In addition to ten feuds, the author examines a long standing question: Are mathematical advances inventions or discoveries?

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Gridworks

Authored By: Thinkfun, Inc.

Published: 2005

Gridworks, a game in book form, exercises your deductive reasoning skills. Players place green, yellow and blue triangles, circles, and Xs on a nine cell square. Think tic-tac-toe. The 60 problems challenge beginners and experts. Two types of clues are given: positive and negative. The book format comes with a magnetic game grid and magnetic tokens.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids

Authored By: Gail Karlitz, Debbie Honig, and Stephen Lewis

Published: November 2001

Where do you keep your money? If you want your money to grow, to make more money, keeping it in your pocket is not the best strategy. This newly updated guide to investing examines savings banks, bonds, and stocks; helps you determine what kind of investor you are; and explains how to read the financial pages in the newspaper. An appendix provides forms for investment tracking.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hacker Ethic, The

Authored By: Pekka Himanen

Published: January 2001

The hackers in this essay are the enthusiastic computer programmers who share their work with others, the original meaning of the word. This book for high school readers and older presents an ethic for the Information Age, one opposing the ethics that drove the Industrial Age. Sections discuss the Work Ethic, the Money Ethic, and the Nethic. An appendix provides a brief history of computer hackerism.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hannah's Collections

Authored By: Marthe Jocelyn

Published: September 2000

Hannah likes to collect things: Popsicle sticks, buttons, stamps, seashells -- anything. When her teacher asks the students to bring in a collection, Hannah can't decide which one to take. Her solution is ingenious. Jocelyn's mixed-media collages are an adventure. Children and math teachers will find plenty to count and add.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hannah, Divided

Authored By: Adele Griffin

Published: September 2002

Hannah Bennett is thirteen and lives in rural Pennsylvania during the 1930s. She can’t read, but she can scan a page of words and tally letters in an instant. She teaches math to the younger students in her one room school. She keeps the books for the family farm. A visitor from Philadelphia is astonished by Hannah’s gift and offers her a chance to pursue her talent in the city. Hannah’s friends and family are reluctant to let her go. Only her grandfather sees math as her future and encourages her.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Head-Scratching, Eye-Catching 3-D Conundrums

Authored By: Laszlo Kresz, Karoly Kresz, and Istvan Kresz

Published: May 2005

Exercise your logic skills with 86 puzzles involving shapes, sequence, color, matching, distinguishing differences, spatial reasoning, simple arithmetic, and mazes. Each page features one brightly colored puzzle making it a perfect choice for a puzzle of the day in a math classroom. The answers are grouped in a separate section at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Henry Hikes to Fitchburg

Authored By: Donald B. Johnson

Published: February 2000

While Henry walks 30 miles to Fitchburg, his friend works in Concord to earn the 90 cents to take a train. The train is faster, he says. But on the way, Henry collects ferns and flowers, climbs a honey tree, and eats his way through a blackberry patch. From page to page, children 4-8 can calculate how far Henry has walked and the how much his friend still needs to earn. Everyone will enjoy the gentle humor of this picture book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hickory Dickory Dock

Authored By: Keith Baker

Published: April 2007

Based on the familiar nursery rhyme, this picture book takes aspiring clock readers through twelve hours, from one oÂ’clock in the afternoon to midnight. Each hour is portrayed on an easy to read large-faced grandfather clock. An energetic mouse and his friends add some extra fun.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hinged Square & Other Puzzles, The

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: November 2004

You don’t need to be a mathematician to enjoy this collection of 73 puzzles and mathematical recreations. Teachers and students will enjoy the mental wrestling required to solve Dudeney’s hinged square transformation and other geometric puzzles, mazes, and games.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

History of Counting, The

Authored By: Denise Schmandt-Besserat and Michael Hays

Published: August 1999

Some humans learn to count by pointing at parts of their bodies, like their neck and ears, and the authors will explain how (plus much more) with exacting research and engaging color photographs.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Honors Class: Hilbert’s Problems and Their Solvers, The

Authored By: Benjamin Yandell

Published: December 2001

In 1900, David Hilbert gave a talk at the Second International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. He lectured on the importance of individual problems, listing those he thought would be most fruitful for mathematics in the twentieth century. Although he had time to talk about only ten, his published paper had twenty-three. This challenging book examines Hilbert’s problems and the mathematicians who solved them or have advanced their solution. In an introductory note, the author assures mathematical and nonmathematical readers that his book can be read and enjoyed for the math or the narrative.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How High Can a Dinosaur Count?: ...and Other Math Mysteries

Authored By: Valorie Fisher

Published: February 2006

Solve a variety of multi-step math problems. Fisher has created fanciful scenes with mixed media and photography. The author provides four additional problems in an appendix for each of the fifteen scenes and challenges her readers to make up their own. Solutions are grouped at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How Many Kisses Do You Want Tonight

Authored By: Varsha Bajaj and Ivan Bates

Published: April 2004

It is nightfall and moms and dads ask their ducklings, kittens, and foals how many bedtime kisses they want. Readers count from one to ten and beyond in rhyming couplets. Bates’s illustrations are bright and cozy.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How Mathematicians Think: Using Ambiguity, Contradiction, and Paradox to Create Mathematics

Authored By: William Byers

Published: May 2007

Princeton mathematician Andrew Wiles described the practice of mathematics as a room by room exploration of a dark mansion - first stumbling over furniture, learning each pieceÂ’s location, finding the light switch and turning it on to illuminate the room, and then moving on to the next room. Mathematicians do not think like Star Trek's Spock. Breakthroughs are often creative intuitive responses to ambiguity, contradiction, and paradox.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How Mathematics Happened: The First 50,000 Years

Authored By: Peter S. Rudman

Published: February 2007

The author traces the birth of mathematics in the pattern recognition and finger counting of hunter-gatherers at least 50,000 years ago. He continues his historical field trip by exploring pebble counting herder-farmers in the Middle East and the Americas, and then Ancient Egypt, Babylon, and Greece. The text features tables and illustrations. Sidebars offer recreational math.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How to Build a Time Machine

Authored By: Paul Davies

Published: February 2002

You won’t need a Delorean, but you’ll need more than what you can find at the local hardware store. After reading this small but dense book, you’ll understand the underlying theory of time travel and possess a plan for constructing a traversable wormhole and turning it into a time machine. A final section addresses questions raised, such as if time travel is possible, where are all the tourists from the future on their time travel getaways?

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How to Cut a Cake: And Other Mathematical Conundrums

Authored By: Ian Stewart

Published: December 2006

Anyone who spends time with kids knows that cake cutting requires precision. Stewart examines the finer points of cake cutting algorithms. By the way, it becomes increasingly complex with more eaters. He recommends further reading for cake cutting and looks at nineteen other conundrums and puzzles, such as shoe lacing techniques, packing problems, tangled phones cords, zero-one programming, predicting when Easter falls, and more. Stewart wanted to title his book Weapons of Math Distraction, which should give you an idea of its playful nature.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

How to Tell a Secret: Tips, Tricks & Techniques for Breaking Codes & Conveying Covert Information

Authored By: P.J. Huff and J. G. Lewin

Published: April 2007

This illustrated history of secret communication opens with a cipher primer. Chapters explore ancient codes and ciphers, military and national applications, and famous secrets revealed. Code fanatics are challenged to crack the kryptos code decorating a sculpture outside the CIA in Langley, Virginia.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Hubert Horatio Bartle Bobton-Trent

Authored By: Lauren Child

Published: May 2005

The Bobton-Trents are frightfully, frightfully rich, but their precocious son, H for short, discovers they soon will be frightfully, frightfully broke if they don’t earn some money. H and his equally wizard friend Stanton crunch numbers and devise a couple of schemes, but in the end, the Bobton-Trents require a radical change in lifestyle. The value of a balanced budget and friendship are explored in an entertaining manner.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

I Knew Two Who Said Moo: A Counting and Rhyming Book

Authored By: Judi Barrett and Daniel Moreton

Published: October 2000

This picture book for children 4-8 contains nonsense verse for the numbers 1-10 fashioned from words rhyming with each number. Moreton's illustrations are as silly and appealing as the verse.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

I Spy Shapes in Art

Authored By: Lucy Micklethwait

Published: August 2004

This introduction to looking at art highlights the shapes artists use in creating paintings. American and European art from the 19th and 20th centuries, painting as different as the realism of Winslow Homer and the abstraction of Auguste Herbin contain eleven two dimensional shapes and three dimensional forms.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Icky Bug Numbers

Authored By: Jerry Pallotta, David Biedrzycki, and Rob Bolster

Published: November 2003

Count from one bug to ten and back to one. Count bugs that are alike. Count antennae and wings. Count legs and spots. Skip count even numbers and odd numbers. Pallotta packs a lot of counting in a small book, and the illustrators provide plenty of realistic icky bug details.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

If You Hopped Like A Frog

Authored By: David M. Schwartz and James Warhola

Published: September 1999

Schwartz and Warhola's science/math tale is a great way to introduce students to ratio and proportion. Learning that a frog can jump 20 times its length, or that an ant can lift an object 50 times its weight, students are able to explore what that might mean in human terms.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Imaginary Tale: The Story of the Square Root of Minus One, An

Authored By: Paul J Nahin

Published: January 2007

Nahin relates for a general and mathematical audience the 2000 year history of the square root of minus one, also known as “i.” He combines mathematical and historical discussions and explains the application of complex numbers and functions to important problems. A series of appendices provide extended mathematical explanations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Imagining Numbers: Particularly the Square Root of Minus Fifteen

Authored By: Barry Mazur

Published: December 2002

This book grew out of a mathematician’s attempt to recreate for non-mathematicians the act of mathematical imagining. In the process of exploring imaginary numbers, Mazur examines the role of imagination and imagery in poetry and mathematics, reviewing the work of Girolamo Cardano and Rafael Bombelli. Be of stout heart. No math beyond multiplication is required.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

In Code: A Mathematical Journey

Authored By: Sarah Flannery David Flannery

Published: May 2001

In 1999, 16 year-old Sarah Flannery was declared Ireland's Young Scientist of the Year for a project called "Cryptography - a new Algorithm Versus the RSA." It dealt with the science of secrecy. In this autobiography, Sarah tells her own intellectual journey from solving problems on a blackboard in the kitchen to her own mathematical discoveries.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Inchworm & A Half

Authored By: Elinor J. Pinczes and Randall Enos

Published: December 2000

An inchworm likes to measure vegetables in a garden but is dismayed when she finds her measurement is just a bit off. A half inchworm comes to her aid as do a third inchworm and quarter inchworm. This would make a good introduction to measurement and fractions for children 4-8.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Incompleteness: The Proof and Paradox of Kurt Godel

Authored By: Rebecca Goldstein

Published: February 2005

Kurt Godel was 23 when he presented his Incompleteness Proof. Goldstein looks at his mathematical theorem and its implications for mathematics as well as the places, people, and ideas that shaped his thinking.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Infinite Ascent: A Short History of Mathematics

Authored By: David Berlinski

Published: September 2005

Berlinski’s brief history of mathematics devotes each of its ten chapters to a breakthrough in mathematics starting with Pythagoras and the right triangle and concluding with Benoit Mandelbrot and Mandelbrot sets.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Infinite Book: A Short Guide to the Boundless, Timeless and Endless, The

Authored By: John D. Barrow

Published: August 2005

If the universe is infinite, then there are an infinite number of exact copies of you reading this sentence on identical planets. How about reading over your own shoulder? This book investigates the implications of infinity, an easy word to use but a slippery concept to understand. What is infinity? What are its logical consequences? Barrow writes for the general reader and looks at mathematics, physics, philosophy, and theology, fields that grapple with the concept.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Infinity: The Quest to Think the Unthinkable

Authored By: Brian Clegg

Published: December 2003

When told there were an infinite number of worlds, Alexander wept that he had not yet conquered one. This tour of the very, very big and the very, very small is aimed at the general reader who is curious about the notable thinkers, from Archimedes to Cantor and Robinson, as well as the mind-boggling concepts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Introducing Fractal Geometry

Authored By: Nigel Lesmoir-Gordon, Will Rood, and Ralph Edney

Published: February 2001

Fractal Geometry is the geometry of the natural world, not the idealized forms of Euclidean Geometry. This comic-book-like primer presents challenging but fundamental concepts in small, understandable doses. Every page is illustrated, and activities help clarify concepts. In addition to the math, the book presents the people behind the ideas, some as familiar as Mandelbrot, some as obscure as Lewis. F. Richardson.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Invisible Web: Uncovering Information Sources Search Engines Can't See, The

Authored By: Gary Price and Chris Sherman

Published: August 2001

If you think the Web is big, the Invisible Web is estimated to be 500 times bigger. This guide is a comprehensive effort to define and map the Invisible web. Chapters examine the visible and invisible webs, present case studies, and explore future technology. Half the book is devoted to resources arranged in subject areas. Each entry supplies a URL and a resource description. A copy of this book belongs in every library, school media center, and computer lab.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Isaac Newton

Authored By: James Gleick

Published: May 2003

Newton invented the calculus, the mathematics of change and flow. He is credited with discovering gravity and for splitting white light into its constituent colors. Yet he also studied Alchemy. Gleick furnishes a fascinating glimpse into the life of a secretive genius.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

It Must Be Beautiful: Great Equations of Modern Science

Authored By: Graham Farmelo

Published: May 2003

Einstein said “The only physical theories that we are willing to accept are the beautiful ones.” The twelve essays in this collection examine Einstein’s notion of mathematical beauty and the importance of mathematics in the sciences during the twentieth century. There is a lot of physics but also biology, chemistry, information science, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Jelly Bean Fun Book, The

Authored By: Karen Capucilli

Published: February 2001

This picture book for children 4-8 is a collection of activities in math, observation, puzzle solving, shape recognition, mazes, and estimation. Every activity is an arrangement of candy, mostly jelly beans but other familiar penny candy too. An appendix supplies the answers and additional jelly bean super-challenges. Don't try to use this book on an empty stomach.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Joy of Mathematics, The

Authored By: Theoni Pappas

Published: 2004

Pappas takes her readers out of the classroom to discover mathematics in the real world. Now in its 20th printing this collection, provides 147 puzzles, historical snapshots, anecdotes, observations, optical illusions, mazes, and more to entertain and instruct. Solutions are at the end of the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Junior Su Doku

Authored By: Newmarket Press

Published: September 2005

Su Doku is a number puzzle in a grid. The hardest examples are on 9x9 grids. This collection is aimed at younger puzzlers and begins with 4x4 grids. For those of you who are not already familiar with this relatively new but immensely popular puzzle type, the object is to fill in the blanks without repeating a number in a row, column, or box. The book contains 122 puzzles from easy to more difficult. The answers are collected at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Just a Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book

Authored By: Yuyi Morales

Published: November 2003

Grandma Beetle is busy getting her house ready for her birthday party when Senor Calavera knocks on her door. Senor Calavera is a skeleton and has come to take her, but she has a trick or two or ten in this combination trickster tale and counting book. Kids count from one to ten in English and Spanish. Morales’s illustrations include many elements of Hispanic culture.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Kepler's Conjecture: How Some of the Greatest Minds in History Helped Solve One of the Oldest Math Problems in the World

Authored By: George G. Szpiro

Published: January 2003

Sir Walter Raleigh needed a way to know how many cannonballs were in a pile by knowing the shape of the pile. His assistant took this problem a step further and looked for a way to fill a ship’s hold with the maximum number of cannonballs. Johannes Kepler provided a quick answer: stack the cannonballs like oranges. This book examines the nearly four hundred year search for a mathematical proof of Kepler’s answer. The book includes fifteen mathematical appendices.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Kids Guide to Money Cents, The

Authored By: Keltie Thomas and Stephen Maceachern

Published: March 2004

What is you money personality? Are you a Major Spendthrift, Cool Operator, or a Scrooge? Complete the assessment and find out, then learn how to find the best deals when shopping, how to start your own business, how to make money, and how to become a millionaire? Billionaire? The section on budgeting is especially valuable.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Kids' Money Book: Earning, Saving, Spending, Investing, Donating, The

Authored By: Jamie Kyle McGillian

Published: April 2003

This guide starts with a history of money, and then examines how to make it, use it, grow it, and control it. An afterword examines the Euro and the twelve European nations that have adopted it.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

King of Infinite Space: Donald Coxeter, the Man Who Saved Geometry

Authored By: Siobhan Roberts

Published: September 2006

Classical geometry fell out of favor in the middle of the twentieth century when Nicholas Bourbaki, in reality a group of French mathematicians, argued that the future of geometry was in analytic geometry. Their motto was “Down with Euclid! Death to the triangles!" This view prevailed. Coxeter ignored the mainstream and became the greatest geometer of the twentieth century. Coxeter groups, numbers and diagrams have played a large role in the investigation of symmetry in math and science. Roberts presents the life and career of a mathematician who completed his last paper two days before he died at 96.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Knots: Mathematics with a Twist

Authored By: Alexei Sossinsky

Published: December 2002

Most of us struggle with knots from time to time. This brief introduction to knots, 127 pages, is written by an expert struggler. Sossinsky presents the basic ideas and explains the application of knot theory in meteorology, physics, and molecular biology. He outlines 150 years of knot theory, highlighting the work of Lord Kelvin, J. W. Alexander, Reidemeister, H. Schubert, Conway, Kauffman, and Vaisiliev. The book features many illustrations and a useful notes section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Knotty Number Problems & Other Puzzles

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: December 2005

The author’s intent is to provoke curiosity and engage creative thinking in this collection of 93 problems dealing with area and combinatorial relationships. Full-page brightly colored puzzles use shape, knots, patterns, tessellations, and more to exercise the brain. This will make a good classroom resource.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Lab Math: A Handbook of Measurements, Calculations, and Other Quantitative Skills for Use at the Bench

Authored By: Dany Spencer Adams

Published: October 2003

This is a practical text for the lab. It covers the basics about numbers and generic types of measurements, numbers used in chemistry, calibration and the use of lab equipment, methods and short cuts for making solutions, methods used in molecular biology, an introduction to statistics and reports and the communication of numerical data, and reference tables and equations. The book is spiral-bound.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century, The

Authored By: David Salsburg

Published: April 2001

One summer afternoon in the late 1920s at a tea party in Cambridge, England, a lady declared that tea poured into milk tasted different from milk poured into tea. Among the scoffing tea drinkers was one, Ronald Aylmer Fisher, who set up an impromptu experiment to test her hypothesis. This book examines Fisher's contributions to the field of statistics and science as well as those of Karl Pearson, W. Edward Deming, and Stella Cunliffe. By the way, though Fisher never described the results of his tea party experiment, one eyewitness reported the lady correctly identified every cup she tasted.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Leonardo's Mirror & Other Puzzles

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: November 2004

This collection of 88 puzzles features Leonardo’s hidden message puzzles, Hamiltonian paths and circuits, and catenary or gravity curves formed when a chain is hung freely between two fixed points. The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is an inverted catenary. There is a lot more too. The graphics are bright and engaging.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Let's Count

Authored By: Tana Hoban

Published: September 1999

In this book for preschool and kindergarten children, Hoban combines simple graphics and photographs to introduce the concepts of number and counting.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Letters to a Young Mathematician

Authored By: Ian Stewart

Published: April 2006

This book takes the form of letters from a mathematician to Meg, an aspiring math student. He introduces the basics and describes what mathematicians do at work and at play. He dispels the myth that a mathematical appreciation of nature is somehow less esthetic than an artistic one.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Little Books of Big Ideas Precalculus: The Power of Functions

Authored By: Lin Mcmullin

Published: July 2005

This concise book (111 pages) on functions supplies comprehensive information in single-variable functions, explains concepts of functions, and includes an appendix covering the basic details of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. It has many illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Little School Bus, The

Authored By: Carol Roth and Pamela Paparone

Published: July 2002

Here comes the school bus, beep, beep, beep. Set in rhyming verse, this picture book follows a bus as it takes seven riders to school and returns them home. Readers can count the riders: a goat, pig, fox, chick bear, worm, and sheep in the bus windows.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Live Well on Less Than You Think: The New York Times Guide to Achieving Your Financial Freedom

Authored By: Fred Brock

Published: January 2005

Want to make your money last longer? Spend less. Even “small” expenses add up. Two cans of soda a day from a vending machine can cost $40 a week. If you buy the same cans in a discount store, you can save up to 75%. The author looks at debt, expenses, insurance, education, cars, credit cards, and retirement and does the math to support his arguments. This would make a good source book for applied math.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Logic Made Easy: How to Know When Language Deceives You

Authored By: Deborah J. Bennett

Published: April 2004

Any problem solving activity involves pattern seeking and conclusions arrived at through logic. We use logic all the time, yet the author argues we are not very logical. This brief and readable introduction to logic uses story, puzzle, illustration, and questions to guide the reader to a better understanding of a critical subject.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Logic Puzzles to Bend Your Brain

Authored By: Kurt Smith

Published: October 2001

Logic puzzle lovers will find 64 challenges in this collection. A puzzle skills chart at the end of the book lists the mathematical skills used in each, such as averaging, measurements, fractions, comparing data, graphs and charts, sorting, decimals, and more. Charts for solving the puzzles are provided, a real blessing for the inexperienced. Solutions are grouped at the end of the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Logical Deduction Puzzles

Authored By: George J. Summers

Published: June 2006

This revised edition has 49 logic puzzles. If you find yourself stumped, a special feature of this collection is a section suggesting problem solving strategies. All solutions are gathered at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Lost!: A Story in String

Authored By: Paul Fleischman and C.B. Mordan

Published: May 2000

When the lights go out during a storm, Grandmother tells a story about a mountain girl lost in a blizzard, illustrating her story with string figures. A lengthy appendix outlines the tradition of string figures and provides directions for making a loop and the figures in the story. Mordan's ink on clayboard illustrations resemble etchings in this story for 4-8 year olds.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Magic Arrow Tile Puzzles

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: June 2006

The object of these puzzles is to arrange 16 arrow tiles within a frame of 20 digits so that each digit has the corresponding number of arrows pointing to it. Sound easy? Dust off your logic and give all 42 noggin numbing numbers a go. The answers are grouped at the end of the spiral-bound book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Making Fractions: Math for Fun

Authored By: Andrew King and Tony Kenyon

Published: April 1998

King and Kenyon incorporate everyday objects like beans, pizzas, and more in their explanation of the many ways fractions of a whole may be represented (decimals, fractions, percents, ratios). A school/library edition is available.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Making Mathematics with Needlework: Ten Papers and Ten Projects

Authored By: Sarah-Marie Belcastro and Carolyn Yackel

Published: December 2007

The authors, both mathematicians, have combined mathematics papers and fiber arts projects illustrating the concepts. Each chapter addresses the underlying math and presents detailed instructions for a Mobius quilt, bi-directional hat, Sierpinski shawl, torus, symmetries sampler, algebraic socks, FortunatusÂ’s purse, pillow of braid equivalence, hyperbolic pants, and an embroidered Holbeinian graph. The book has many full-color photos.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Man Who Broke Napoleon's Codes, The

Authored By: Mark Urban

Published: March 2002

This military history reveals the contributions made by a forgotten commoner, a cryptographer on the Duke of Wellington's staff, to the ultimate defeat of Napoleon. A tale describing the early days of cryptography and one of Europe's greatest military campaigns, the Peninsular Wars (1807-1814), makes for exciting reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Man Who Counted: A Collection of Mathematical Adventures, The

Authored By: Malba Tahan translated by Patricia Reid Baquero

Published: February 1993

This book was first published in Brazil in 1949 by the mathematician Julio de Melo e Sousa. Tahan was an imaginary Arab author. On the road to Baghdad, Hanak Tade Maia meets Beremiz Samir, the man who counted. Hanak observes as Beremiz uses his mathematics to settle disputes, give advice, overcome enemies, right wrongs, and become rich. In 34 chapters, readers learn about mathematics, a science the Arabs developed and extended.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Master Math: Solving Word Problems: Analyze Any Word Problem, Translate It into Mathematical Terms, and Get the Right Answer!

Authored By: Brita Immergut

Published: August 2003

This handbook is a guide for tackling word problems. It follows suggestions of the National Council of teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and uses problems like those found in the PSATs and SATs. Separate sections treat equation, percents, mixed, measurement, rate, statistics and probability, and geometry problems. An appendix review types of equations. Answers are given for practice questions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Master Math: Trigonometry

Authored By: Debra Anne Ross

Published: January 2002

Trigonometry has applications in astronomy, engineering, physics, chemistry, geography, navigation, surveying, architecture and the studies of electricity, light, and sound. This reference for students, teachers, and parents provides an application-oriented approach to the subject and features real-world examples. The text reviews numbers, coordinate systems, and basic geometry before presenting a comprehensive explanation of the fundamentals of trigonometry.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Matchstick Puzzles

Authored By: Jack Botermans

Published: August 2006

The author suggests toothpicks as a safer manipulative for this collection of puzzles. Determine the correct number of triangles, squares, rhomboids, hexagons, and other figures formed with sticks. Puzzles are rated easy, medium, and diificult, and the solutions are grouped at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math and the Mona Lisa: The Art and Science of Leonardo da Vinci

Authored By: Bulent Atalay

Published: April 2004

Both artist and physicist, Atalay is perfectly suited to argue that while most artists intuitively use the scientific elements of perspective, proportion, shape, and symmetry in their work, Leonardo most likely did so consciously. This book attempts to synthesize art and science. After presenting the framework of science and math underlying art, Atalay examines Leonardo’s model.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Appeal

Authored By: Greg Tang and Harry Briggs

Published: February 2003

In this collection, every two-page spread presents a different rhyming riddle and illustration to solve. Use your creative problem solving skills to arrive at an answer. Tang includes a hint for a labor-saving approach in each case. Still stumped? The answers and efficient approaches are included in a closing section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Charmers: Tantalizing Tidbits for the Mind

Authored By: Alfred S. Posamentier

Published: May 2003

The beauty of mathematics is often neglected in favor of its utility. This book highlights the beauty. Chapters cover beauty in numbers, arithmetic marvels, problems with surprising solutions, algebraic entertainments, geometric wonders, mathematical paradoxes, counting and probability, and a concluding miscellany. One activity, in a collection of more than one hundred, has students prove that the angles of a triangle equal 180 degrees by folding its vertices to its base.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Curse

Authored By: Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith

Published: October-95

A fantastic math adventure for readers age 9-12! Imagine the terror of the narrator when she wakes up one day to discover that everything in her life has turned into a math problem. She suspects that her teacher, Mrs. Fibonacci, has put a math curse on her, and in her quest to rid herself of this hex, she spirits readers into a lively and informative world of math know-how.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Dictionary: The Easy, Simple, Fun Guide to Help Math Phobics Become Math Lovers

Authored By: Eula Ewing Monroe

Published: October 2006

Sometimes it’s the vocabulary of math that gets in the way of doing math. This dictionary provides clear, concise definitions of terms with many illustrations. Definitions are cross referenced to related terms. “Did You Know” factoids are sprinkled throughout the text.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Explorer: A Journey through the Beauty of Mathematics, The

Authored By: Jefferson Hane Weaver

Published: September 2003

This introduction to mathematics is aimed at the general reader. It covers irrational numbers, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, differential and integral calculus, the concepts of zero and infinity, vectors, set theory, chance, and probability. It includes brief biographies of Copernicus, Descartes, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Fables

Authored By: Greg Tang and Heather Cahoon

Published: March 2004

Familiar fables are the framework for a counting book that explores all the possible combinations of numbers that make 1-10. A final section reviews combining numbers to make numbers and gives more practice.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Fair Blues and Henry Keeps Score

Authored By: Sue Kassirer and Jerry Smath; Daphne Skinner and Page Eastburn O’Rouke

Published: February 2001

In Math Fair Blues, it’s time for Math Fair. Seth asks if his band can give a concert instead of doing a project. His teacher insists on a project. When they decorate their band t-shirts with circles, rectangles, triangles, and squares, they unknowingly complete a project. In Henry Keeps Score, Henry insists on getting as much as his sister, until he learns she has a cavity. Both early reader books include related information and math activities.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math for All Seasons

Authored By: Greg Tang and Harry Briggs

Published: February 2002

Each two-page spread presents a counting problem in riddle form. Find the answers by simply counting or look for patterns and combine items. This brightly illustrated book encourages creative problem solving. Answers are provided at the end of the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Gene: How Mathematical Thinking Evolved and Why Numbers Are Like Gossip, The

Authored By: Keith J. Devlin

Published: August 2000

Are you frustrated in math class? This book for high schoolers and older, argues that the ability to think mathematicfally arises from the same symbol-manipulating capacity that underlies language. You're probably better in math than you think. You just don't recognize when you are using mathematical reasoning. The author suggests ways to improve mathematical skills.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Hysteria: Fun and Games with Mathematics

Authored By: Ian Stewart

Published: June 2004

Most have experienced it, but how many of us have contemplated the math underlying our toast falling butter-side down? The author, who wrote the Mathematical Recreations column for Scientific American for eleven years, blames Euclid and the Greeks for making mathematics seem tedious and mechanical. He much prefers the playful spirit of the Babylonians and Egyptians. Stewart serves plenty of mathematical fun in twenty chapters.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Instinct: Why You're a Mathematical Genius (Along with Lobsters, Birds, Cats, and Dogs), The

Authored By: Keith Devlin

Published: March 2005

In 1992, a researcher announced that babies four months old could tell the difference between groups of one, two, and three objects and that they could recognize when objects were added or subtracted. Later experiments found that infants two days old could do the same math. So, if the ability to work with numbers is wired in, why do many of us have trouble in the classroom? Math as it is commonly taught is an abstract exercise. Devlin suggests that student success would increase if the math they did was given meaning.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Potatoes: Mind-stretching Brain Food

Authored By: Greg Tang and Harry Briggs

Published: July 2005

Once again Tang and Briggs have produced a book to develop problem solving skills. The counting tasks in this collection at can be approached in different ways. Grouping provides an answer in a jiffy. The problems and approach hints are in verse. A final section reveals and explains the solutions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Rashes: And Other Classroom Tales

Authored By: Douglas Evans and Larry Di Fiori

Published: September 2000

What can a substitute teacher do when her class breaks out in math rashes: plus and minus signs, digits zero to nine, multiplication and division signs, and entire math problems? Cure them by taking the class out for recess. Some very strange things happen in this collection of stories set in W.T. Melon Elementary School. This chapter book would make a good classroom read aloud book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Stuff

Authored By: Theoni Pappas

Published: June 2002

This is not a book of numbers, formulas, or computations, writes the author in her introduction, but a book of ideas, mathematical ideas as diverse as cricket chirps and computer crashes. All the math in the 38 short chapters is discussed in general terms. Readers will find plenty of illustrations and suggestions for further reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math through the Ages: A Gentle History for Teachers and Others

Authored By: William P. Berlinghoff and Fernando Q. Gouvêa

Published: December 2003

This history opens with a 60 page overview of mathematics. It traces the major developments, provides 25 essays on subjects like pi, non-Euclidean geometries, and logic. A final section points the curious to print and Internet resources. This expanded edition includes classroom resource material.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Trek: Adventures in the Math Zone

Authored By: Ivars Peterson and Nancy Henderson

Published: October 1999

In the Math Zone, students take a trip through the Fractal Forest and ride a Möbius roller coaster. The book includes more than 40 fun activities and sidebars to help explain underlying math concepts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math Word Problems Demystified

Authored By: Allan G. Bluman

Published: July 2004

This example filled tutorial in problem solving opens with a review of George Polya’s four step method. It provides plenty of practice, quizzes, and a final exam in the ten basic types of word problems found in math textbooks. Chapters highlight decimals, fractions, percents, and equations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Math-Terpieces

Authored By: Greg Tang and Greg Paprocki

Published: July 2003

Tang's stated mission is to make math and problem solving a part of every child's life. His approach is always fun. In his latest book he uses elements from familiar paintings instead of numerals to teach addition and problem solving strategies. The book features the work of twelve artists from Degas to Warhol. Paprocki uses color and design to group objects from each painting like umbrellas, fish, or eyes. A solution section describes approaches to each set of problems. Art notes provide descriptions of the nine art movements represented.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematical Century: The 30 Greatest Problems of the Last 100 Years, The

Authored By: Piergiorgio Odifreddi

Published: October 2006

More mathematical theorems have been proved and results found in the last hundred years than in all of previous history. The author has selected 30 problems of pure and applied mathematics and describes their origins and their solutions. The final chapter presents some open problems like the perfect numbers problem and Complexity Theory’s P = NP problem.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematical Mystery Tour: Discovering the Truth and Beauty of the Cosmos, A

Authored By: A.K. Dewdney

Published: February 1999

Is mathematics discovered or created? Why is mathematics so useful in the natural sciences? A.K. Dewdney takes young adult readers on an fictional journey to Miletus, Aqaba, Venice, and Oxford to answer these and other related questions in an entertaining and clearly written book on the power of mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematical Puzzles: A Connoisseur's Collection

Authored By: Peter Winkler

Published: December 2003

This collection of 100 puzzles is organized by themes: insight, numbers, combinatorics, probability, geometry, geography, games, algorithms, handicaps, toughies, and unsolved. Solutions are found at the end of each section, except the unsolved section, of course.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematics Elsewhere: An Exploration of Ideas across Cultures

Authored By: Marcia Ascher

Published: September 2002

This cross-cultural mathematics examines divination, time measurement, cycles of time, models and maps, systems of relationships, and threshold figures in South America, Oceania, Africa, Europe, India, and Indonesia. Artifacts and methods are illustrated from traditional cultures like the Maya, Marshall Islanders, Tongans, Trobriand Islanders, Borano, Malagasy, Basque, Tamil, Balinese, and Kodi.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematics of Games, The

Authored By: John D. Beasley

Published: January 2006

Games can be divided into four classes: those of pure chance, mixed chance and skill, pure skill, and automatic. In short chapters, the author analyzes and illustrates the mathematics underlying games from golf to chess. If you like to win, this reprint of a 1989 title can provide some tips.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mathematics of Oz: Mental Gymnastics from Beyond the Edge, The

Authored By: Clifford A. Pickover

Published: October 2002

This puzzle collection contains 108 brain busters rated from the merely difficult to the outrageously difficult, probably impossible for Dorothy and other Homo sapiens to solve. If that word "impossible" is a challenge you can't refuse, this collection will supply hours of fun and frustration. Puzzle types include geometry; mazelike problems; sequences, series, sets and arrangements; physical world; probability and misdirection; number theory and arithmetic.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Memory and Dreams: The Creative Human Mind

Authored By: George Christos

Published: February 2003

Mathematical models suggest that the brain can generate false memories by combining features of stored memories. The author, an Australian mathematician who studies neural networks, memory and learning, and adaptive systems, argues that such spurious memories are the basis for creativity and that they are required for learning. Dreaming helps to organize memory by processing the new and forgetting the unimportant. In a startling chapter, Christos proposes that infant dreaming may provide an explanation of SIDS.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mensa Brain Bafflers

Authored By: Philip J. Carter and Ken A. Russell

Published: June 2004

A compilation of three previously published puzzle collections, this book includes many time honored puzzles from what the authors believe was the golden age of puzzlers, the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries. Eager puzzlers will find visual and mathematical challenges as well as others based in anagrams, numbers, magic squares, codes and ciphers, and logic. All the answers are in a separate concluding section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mensa Math and Logic Puzzles

Authored By: Dave Tuller and Michael Rios

Published: October 2000

All the puzzles in this spiral-bound collection can be solved with a pencil, or ten, logical thinking, and a bit of arithmetic. It includes a variety of puzzle types, including battleship, dominoes, hex loops, lighthouse, minesweeper, snaky tiles, worms, and more. An appendix provides the answers. But don't cheat!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mental Math Challenges

Authored By: Michael L. Lobosco

Published: March 1999

This collection of mathematical recreations for children 9-12 contains projects, puzzles, and tricks. Chapters include activities with circles and flexagons, instant calculations and mind reading, illusions, precise measurement without instruments, math in every day life, and solitaire games. The perfect book for parties, long car trips, or any time kids want to challenge their brains.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Midnight Math: Twelve Terrific Math Games

Authored By: Peter Ledwon and Marilyn Mets

Published: March 2000

When the clock strikes midnight, Chester, Leon, and Maury are ready to play. Each page provides a different math-related game. Some games use counting or simple addition and subtraction. Others require playing cards, dice, buttons, or homemade calculators. There's even a hopscotch game. The last page provides answers for activities that require answers. This book is for children 4-8, and their big sisters and brothers.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Millennium Problems: The Seven Greatest Unsolved Mathematical Puzzles of Our Time , The

Authored By: Keith J. Devlin

Published: October 2002

One million dollars in prize money awaits anyone who solves one of the mathematical problems identified by the Clay Foundation. This book provides a background for each problem and explains why they are so hard to understand. As the author says, most are impossible to describe accurately in lay terms. The problems are in topology, number theory, particle physics, cryptography, computing, and aircraft design.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Million Dots, A

Authored By: Andrew Clements and Mike Reed

Published: June 2006

What would a million dots look like? Open this book. If you look at each dot for one second, it will take eleven and a half days to see them all. Along the way to a million, Clements and Reed feature other fascinating numbers: a mosquito’s wings beat 600 times a second. Light travels at 186,000 miles a second. In the last sixteen days, more than 500,000 cars have gone to junk yards.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Millions to Measure

Authored By: David M. Schwartz and Steven Kellogg

Published: March 2003

There are millions of things and many ways to measure. In this picture book, Marvelosissimo the Mathematical Magician takes the kids on an exploration of measurement: length, weight, and volume. After a discussion of standard measure, Schwartz and Kellogg present the metric system. The book concludes with an appendix on measuring and the metric system.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mind Workout Book: 150 Exercises to Train Your Brain to the Peak of Perfection, The

Authored By: Robert Allen

Published: October 2003

Allen is convinced that you can enhance your mind power by working through the exercises in his book. He provides tasks in concentration, creativity, problem solving, and lateral thinking. An introductory questionnaire helps you to focus on specific color-coded areas: memory, problem solving, communication, creativity, and mind development. Each exercise is rated for difficulty and provides an estimate of time required.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mind-Sharpening Logic Games

Authored By: Andrea Angiolino

Published: March 2003

This collection of thirty-nine games and variations requires only the simplest equipment to stretch the brain. Games use words, pencil strokes, and numbers. A second section suggests strategies for eight of the games. A table rates the difficulty of each game from one to three stars, tells how many can play, and whether you need plain or graph paper.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for the 100th Day of Kindergarten

Authored By: Joseph Slate and Ashley Wolff

Published: September 1998

Creative invention is afoot when Miss Bindergarten tells her students to bring "100 of some wonderful, one-hundred-full thing" to celebrate the first 100 days of kindergarten. Kids will love the crafts and contraptions inspired by this spirited teachers' instructions; educators will appreciate the authors' tribute to their real-life inspirations for the character of Miss Bindergarten, presented in an appendix.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mobius Strip: Dr. August Mobius's Marvelous Band in Mathematics, Games, Literature, Art, Technology, and Cosmology, The

Authored By: Clifford A. Pickover

Published: April 2006

The author introduces August Mobius and then describes applications of his Mobius strip in mathematics, magic, science, art, engineering, literature, and music. As always, Pickover writes about mind-stretching ideas in an accessible manner. The book contains many illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Moment of Proof: Mathematical Epiphanies, The

Authored By: Donald C. Benson

Published: March 1999

When Archimedes suddenly hit upon the principle of buoyancy, he jumped from his bath and ran naked through the streets of Syracuse, crying "eureka!" Encounter the Monty Hall Problem, learn Russian peasant multiplication, calculate the number of ways a chef can combine ten or fewer spices. Benson has written an introduction to the joy of mathematical discovery in which the general reader, high school or older, arrives at solutions as a scientist would, and with the same feeling of surprise.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Money, Money, Money: Where It Comes From, How to Save It, Spend It, and Make It

Authored By: Eve Drobot

Published: September 2004

The Lydians minted the first coins more than two thousand years ago in the region that is now called Turkey. The coins were a mix of gold and silver called electrum. Explore the world of money. Drobot covers the history, terminology, minting and printing, and saving and spending of money. She includes a chapter on cops and robbers and buried treasure.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Monster Math

Authored By: Anne Miranda and Polly Powell

Published: August 1999

Readers age 4-8 will enjoy the highly creative, whimsical illustrations of monsters attending a birthday party in this rhyming, counting book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

More Chinese Brain Twisters

Authored By: Baifang

Published: August 1999

Try out some of these Chinese "brain games" designed to develop logic, verbal reasoning, and spatial sense. Baifang offers 57 stick-puzzle games and verbal problems in this challenging puzzler.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mother Goose Math

Authored By: Harriet Ziefert and Emily Bolan

Published: July 1999

Young readers will enjoy investigating how familiar nursery rhymes teach basic, important math concepts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mrs. McTats and Her Houseful of Cats

Authored By: Alyssa Satin Capucilli and Joan Rankin

Published: May 2001

Mrs. McTats buys a fish to share with Abner, her cat, but scratching at her door announces the arrival of two more cats. She invites them in and calls them Basil and Curly. The next day three new cats appear. This amusing tale is told in verse. Children can count, add, and anticipate the names of the new cats as Mrs. McTats progresses through the alphabet. The last arrival is a surprise. Rankin's cats are endearing and sport oddly human noses.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mummy Math: An Adventure in Geometry

Authored By: Cindy Neuschwander and Bryan Langdo

Published: April 2005

When Matt and Bibi Zills are trapped inside an Egyptian pyramid, they follow geometric clues to escape. This geometric adventure introduces eight common geometric solids: cone, cylinder, cube, sphere, pyramid, tetrahedron, rectangular prism, and triangular prism. Search the illustrations for addition examples of the solids.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Museum Shapes

Authored By: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Published: September 2005

Search for ten shapes in this collection of art from around the world and spanning thousand s of years. An appendix identifies the art.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Music of the Primes: Searching to Solve the Greatest Mystery in Mathematics, The

Authored By: Marcus du Sautoy

Published: April 2003

Is there a pattern to prime numbers? Mathematicians since the Ancient Greeks have tried to answer this question. Bernard Riemann presented a paper in 1859 on primes that suggested an answer, but when Riemann died his housekeeper burned all his personal papers. No one knows if he found the proof. This account of the search for a proof to Riemann's Hypothesis is filled with the brilliant, the eccentric, a million dollar prize, and implications for banking, e-commerce, quantum physics, chaos theory, and computing.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

My Einstein: Essays by Twenty-four of the World's Leading Thinkers on the Man, His Work, and His Legacy

Authored By: John Brockman, Editor

Published: July 2006

This collection contains personal essays written by John Archibald Wheeler, Leonard Susskind, Lee Smolin, Jana Levin, Paul C. W. Davies, George Smoot, Maria Spiropulu, George Dyson, and more big names in big ideas. Smoot writes about aesthetics and observation in Einstein's theories. Wheeler writes about Einstein as a mentor. Rocky Kolb writes about the discovery Einstein didn't make.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

My Full Moon is Square

Authored By: Elinor J. Pinczes and Randall Enos

Published: September 2002

Frog reads by the light of the moon until clouds cover it. Helpful fireflies square off to help, though careful to stay out of range of his tongue. The smallest square, 2 by 2 is not bright enough. Neither is 3 by 3 and 4 by 4. And 10 by 10 proves blinding. The resourceful fireflies have a solution. This makes a fun introduction to the concept of squares.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mystery of Numbers, The

Authored By: Marc-Alain Ouaknin

Published: September 2004

What is the difference between as number and a numeral? Numbers exist independently. Numerals are bound to language and writing. This multicultural exploration of numbers and numerals covers 1000 years and looks at history, symbolism, and philosophy. The book features scores of photos, illustrations, charts, art, and artifacts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Mystery of the Aleph: Mathematics, the Kabbalah, and the Search for Infinity, The

Authored By: Amir D. Aczel

Published: October 2000

The Aleph is the sum of positive integers. It is not the last positive number because there is no last number. It can only be approached. Is that clear? This book for the mathematically inclined middle school student or older tells the story of Georg Cantor, a 19th century mathematician who pioneered the study of infinity. One last point to ponder: There are as many points on a line one inch long as on a line one mile long.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Myth of Ability: Nuturing Mathematical Talent in Every Child, The

Authored By: John Mighton

Published: September 2004

The author believes everyone can become proficient in mathematics. His program JUMP (Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies) is based on that belief and it works. It has been implemented in hundreds of Canadian schools and is being tested in the U.S. Mighton describes the conception of JUMP and presents his method for fractions, multiplication and division, coordinate systems, ratios and percents, logic and systematic search, and finite state automata. He includes practice exercises.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Negative Math: How Mathematical Rules Can Be Positively Bent

Authored By: Alberto A. Martinez

Published: November 2005

Mathematicians can devise unusual rules of signs to explore their consequences. For example: a system in which -4 x -4 = -16. Such “fooling around” isn’t talked about in schools, but one aim of this book is too show how new maths can describe aspects of the physical world. The author uses history, puzzles, and high school algebra to entertain a general and professional audience.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Nonplussed!: Mathematical Proof of Implausible Ideas

Authored By: Julian Havil

Published: March 2007

The author has collected paradoxes, mathematical conclusions that seem unreasonable or impossible. He examines problems in probability and statistics, tennis scoring, needle tossing, TorricelliÂ’s Trumpet, hyperdimensions, Friday the 13th and more.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure, The

Authored By: Hans Magnus Enzensberger and Rotraut Susanne Berner

Published: May 2000 (Reprint edition)

Originally published in the U.S. in 1998, this book for readers 10 and up is finally available in paperback. Robert, a 12 year old who hates math, has a series of dreams in which a number devil manages to make difficult mathematical principles understandable. Humor and full color illustrations make this book fun as well as instructive.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Number Jugglers Math Game Book

Authored By: Ruth Bell Alexander

Published: August 1998

Alexander invites children in grades K-8 to have lots of fun as they work through twenty open ended, problem solving games designed to strengthen skills in computation and solving equations. The book comes with a set of 86 number practice cards and Alexander provides a preface for parents and teachers.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Number: The Language of Science

Authored By: Tobias Dantzig

Published: March 2005

In this new edition of his classic, Dantzig describes the development of mathematics from our innate number sense to the leading edge of modern math. This updated version includes a new notes section and bibliography written by math professor Joseph Mazur. For the mathematically curious, there is an extensive further reading section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Nuts and Bolts of Proofs, 2nd Edition, The

Authored By: Antonella Cupillari

Published: March 2001

This book is an explanation of mathematical proofs. It presents the rules of logic and technique to construct proofs. The second edition provides more examples, exercises, and a complete treatment of mathematical induction and set theory. This accessible book can be used in the classroom or for self-study.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Of Numbers and Stars: The Story of Hypatia

Authored By: D. Anne Love and Pam Paparone

Published: March 2006

Hypatia was born in Alexandria 1600 years ago, and because her father was a professor, she was educated in a manner not common for girls. In time, she became a widely respected teacher of math, science, and philosophy. This biography includes notes and recommended reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Olivia Counts

Authored By: Ian Falconer

Published: June 2002

Count from one to ten with Olivia, a most charming piglet with her own sense of style. Can you guess where she ties her two hair bows? This heavy board book will take a lot of punishment.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Once Upon Einstein

Authored By: Thibault Damour

Published: March 2006

This is not a biography of a man but of his mind at work. Get inside Einstein’s head and share the excitement as he understands a part of the universe’s hidden order.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Beyond a Million: An Amazing Math Journey

Authored By: David M. Schwartz and Paul Meisel

Published: September 1999

When Professor X's popcorn machine won't stop spewing popcorn, Numero tries to count the kernels, but as quick as he is, he can't count fast enough. Professor X and his dog Y suggest Power Counting or counting by powers of ten. This picture book for 9-12 years olds presents real-life examples of really big numbers, such as how many trees we could save if everyone in the U.S. recycled newspaper and how many atoms are in every breath we take.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Is a Drummer: A Book of Numbers

Authored By: Roseanne Thong and Grace Lin

Published: May 2004

Young counters count from one to ten dragon boats, seasons, candles, bamboo shoots, and more and learn about aspects of Chinese culture as well. Rhyming verse identifies some of the details to be counted, but close observation of each two-page spread will reveal even more, and a few surprises too. A glossary explains references to Chinese culture.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Leaf Rides the Wind: Counting in a Japanese Garden

Authored By: Celeste Davidson Mannis and Susan Kathleen Hartung

Published: September 2002

Count from one to ten, read eleven Haiku, and discover aspects of Japanese culture all in one beautifully picture book. An end note describes Japanese gardens and the Haiku poetic form.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Lighthouse, One Moon

Authored By: Anita Lobel

Published: April 2000

This picture book for children 4-8 has three chapters each with a different subject: days of the week, months and seasons, and counting one to ten. The counting chapter has full-page illustrations of the sea. Lobel's paintings are vibrant and energetic. Her bold brush strokes recall Van Gogh.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Lonely Sea Horse

Authored By: Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers

Published: April 2000

Children 4-8 can count to ten in this ingeniously illustrated story about a lonely sea horse. All the creatures and the reef are made of fruits and vegetables. At the end of the story, a key is provided for readers unfamiliar with some of the more exotic foods. Set in rhyming couplets, this book will continue to please after many readings.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Red Dot: A Pop-Up Book for Children of All Ages

Authored By: David A. Carter

Published: September 2005

In this intricate pop-up book, Carter has fashioned ten fantastic paper sculptures. One puzzle box to ten curlicues hide one red dot for young children to discover. The book is fragile and is best viewed with an adult.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

One Witch

Authored By: Laura Leuck and S. D. Schindler

Published: August 2003

A witch needs ingredients for a special brew. Two cats provide a fish. Four goblins throw in some slugs. Nine skeletons give a finger bone. The witch then invites all the contributors to a party. Told in rhyming verse and with suitably gruesome illustrations, you can count on this book to keep everyone happy.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Optical Illusion Magic: Visual Tricks & Amusements

Authored By: Michael Anthony DiSpezio

Published: May 2000

Readers 9-12 will find this collection of familiar and unusual illusions a great way to spend an afternoon. Each section features an illusion, some variations, and an explanation of what is going on. It provides instructions for making a pair of 3D glasses to view stereo images of Mars too.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Out of the Labyrinth: Setting Mathematics Free

Authored By: Robert Kaplan and Ellen Kaplan

Published: January 2007

The authors are the founders of The Math Circle, a learning program at Harvard. They describe math education today as the mastery of skills and facts. Rather, they argue, math should be taught as the highest form of intellectual play. Chapters examine barriers to math appreciation, how mathematicians really work, and the Math Circle Program.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Over the Meadow: A Counting Rhyme

Authored By: Olive A. Wadsworth and Anna Vojtech

Published: March 2002

This latest version of a well-known 19th-century counting rhyme features large format illustrations. Each spread from one baby to ten beavers contains corresponding background details to search for and to count.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Passion for Mathematics: Numbers, Puzzles, Madness, Religion, and the Quest for Reality, A

Authored By: Clifford A. Pickover

Published: July 2005

Take a tour through the world of mathematics. Pickover supplies history, biography, philosophy, number theory, geometry, probability, huge numbers and scores of problems for math novices and masters. The book features illustrations, factoids, anecdotes, definitions, and quotations. Answers are grouped in a final section. This will make a good class resource.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Peer-to-Peer: Harnessing the Power of Disruptive Technologies

Authored By: Andy Oram, Editor

Published: March 2001

When you hear the term, "peer-to-peer file sharing," you probably think of Napster and others like Gnutella and Freenet have provoked much legal debate, but what's behind the technology? In this collection of essays, peer-to-peer pioneers explain how technology is changing the way we communicate and exchange information and explore where it is and where it may be going.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Perplexing Pattern Problems & Other Puzzles

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: December 2005

This book offers 92 recreational math problems. The puzzles deal with the four color problem, balance, Mobius strip, knots, the movement and position of chess pieces, and a variety of others. This will make a good classroom resource.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pi: A Biography of the World's Most Mysterious Number

Authored By: Alfred S Posamentier and Ingmar Lehmann

Published: August 2004

The concept of pi is about 4,000 years old. To put that fact into perspective, our place value decimal system has been used in the West for about 800 years. The authors explain what pi is and how its value is calculated, discuss pi enthusiasts and curiosities, and show its applications and paradoxes. The Epilogue, pi to 100,000 decimal places, fills 27 pages.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Piece = Part = Portion: Fractions = Decimals = Percents

Authored By: Scott Gifford and Shmuel Thaler

Published: August 2003

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words, or at least half that. Photos illustrate fractions of sandwiches, teams, traffic lights in each two-page spread. Fractions are also stated as decimals and percents. An introduction shows how fractions are converted to decimals and percents.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pigs in the Pantry

Authored By: Amy Axelrod and Sharon McGinley-Nally

Published: August 1999

When Mrs. Pig falls ill, it's up to the rest of the Pig family to fend for themselves at mealtime. Follow their funny adventures as they use math skills to work with a recipe.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pigs on the Ball: Fun With Math and Sports

Authored By: Amy Axelrod

Published: August 1998

When the pig family takes a trip to the golf course, their game becomes a learning experience for readers grades 2-6. Kids learn about geometry as the story unfolds and are invited to participate in the pigs' golf game with a game board and geometric game pieces that are provided with the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pigs on the Move: Fun With Math and Travel

Authored By: Amy Axelrod and Sharon McGinley-Nally

Published: October 1999

The Pigs miss their flight to Bean Town and wonder if they will have Christmas with the cousins. Arranging another flight, Mr. Pig saves the day. Or does he? The pilot and crew look a lot like Santa and the reindeer, and the flight has a few unexpected stops. Children 4-8 will learn about time zones, distance and speed.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pizza Fractions

Authored By: Jerry Pallotta and Rob Bolster

Published: September 2007

How many ways can you cut a pan pizza into equal pieces? This appetizing look at the parts of a whole illustrates proper and improper fractions all related to pizza and its ingredients.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Planiverse: Computer Contact With a Two-Dimensional World, The

Authored By: A. K. Dewdney

Published: September 2000

This is a republication of a novel that first appeared in 1984 and that has generated a cult following. First contact with the two-dimensional inhabitants of the planiverse was made when the author and his students were running a program called 2DWORLD. So opens a book that challenges readers to imagine how a two-dimensional world might work. This book combines fantasy, puzzle, and a cautionary tale about the difficulty of communicating with alien worlds.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Platonic & Archimedean Solids

Authored By: Daud Sutton

Published: April 2002

Impress the coach by telling him a soccer ball resembles a truncated icosahedron. Well, maybe it will impress your date. The sphere is the foundation of the five Platonic and thirteen Archimedean solids. These eighteen creations are the building blocks of three dimensional space and central to architecture, chemistry, and atomic physics. This small book features elegant line drawings by the author and enough information to satisfy serious students of science, design, and mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Poincare Conjecture: In Search of the Shape of the Universe, The

Authored By: Donal O'Shea

Published: March 2007

In 1904 Poincare published a paper dealing with the potential shape of the universe. Proving or disproving his conjecture has occupied mathematicians for 100 years making it the most famous problem in geometry and topology. In 2000 the Clay mathematics Institute named it one of the seven essential unsolved problems of the new millennium and put up a one million dollar prize. In 2002, Grigory Perelman posted his solution on the Internet. This is a dense but exciting narrative covering the personalities, institutions, and research behind the mathematics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Probability and Statistics: The Science of Uncertainty

Authored By: John Tabak

Published: March 2005

This history of mathematics presents an overview of two fields essential to the sciences. He introduces the mathematicians, describes the development of probability and statistics and explains their present day applications. The book includes a chronology, glossary, and list of Internet resources.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pursuit of Genius: Flexner, Einstein, and the Early Faculty at the Institute for Advanced Study

Authored By: Steve Batterson

Published: June 2006

It was to be a place to foster genius through research. The Institute for Advanced Studies was founded in 1930 by Abraham Flexner and funded by Louis Bamberger and his sister, Carrie Fuld. Flexner’s first hires included Oswald Veblen, Albert Einstein, and John von Neumann. Batterson examines the personalities behind one of the most famous centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry in the world.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Puzzle Instinct: The Meaning of Puzzles in Human Life, The

Authored By: Marcel Danesi

Published: May 2002

Puzzles have been around since 1650 B.C. Why? Puzzles appeared about the same time as myth, magic, and the occult arts. The author suggests that puzzles provide small-scale experiences of the large-scale questions life poses. Though mainly a philosophical investigation into the puzzle instinct, this book also furnishes an introduction to puzzle genres. Puzzles introduced in the book have solutions at the end.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Puzzlemania Superchallenge

Authored By: Jeff O'Hare, editor

Published: February 1999

This four-volume set of tantalizing brain teasers will test the logic of children age 10 and up. The "Brain-O-Meter" icon provides an easy way to assess each puzzle's level of difficulty; the puzzles are adapted from the popular Highlights for Children Puzzlemania series.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Puzzles 101: A Puzzlemaster's Challenge

Authored By: Nobuyuki Yoshigahara

Published: December 2003

This collection of mathematical puzzles should furnish an athletic workout for sluggish brains. You’ll find challenges in measurement, shape, area, logic, computation, and more. The answers are grouped in a concluding section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Puzzling Adventures: Tales of Strategy, Logic, and Mathematical Skill

Authored By: Dennis E. Shasha

Published: January 2005

The 36 puzzles in this collection had their beginnings in Scientific American. They have been expanded for this book. Chapters contain problems in logic, graphs and circuits, strategy and games, science and form, and combinatorics. Understanding the puzzles seldom requires more than junior high math skills. All the solutions are grouped in a concluding section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Pythagorean Theorem: A 4,000-Year History, The

Authored By: Eli Maor

Published: May 2007

There are more than 400 proofs of the theorem attributed to Pythagoras, including one by a 12 year old Albert Einstein and another by Grover Cleveland. The author examines the theorem from 1800 BCE in Mesopotamia to the present. He describes the personalities involved in its development. Sidebars provide tangential entertainment. Eight appendices offer more mathematical proofs and solutions to brain teasers posed in the text.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Q. E. D: Beauty in Mathematical Proof

Authored By: Burkard Polster

Published: April 2004

Pythagoras’s theorem may be familiar, but this book makes the proof visually understandable. This brief book elucidates twenty mathematical proofs from Cavalieri’s Principle to Euler’s Formula. It opens with a discussion of what proofs are and ends with five appendices of additional material.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Quack and Count

Authored By: Keith Baker

Published: September 1999

There is more than one way to count to seven, as Keith Baker's picture book for children 4-8 illustrates. Follow seven ducklings as they slide, play peekaboo, chase bumble bees, quack, dive, swim, and fly across the pages.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Rebel Code: Linux and the Open Source Revolution

Authored By: Glyn Moody

Published: January 2001

For high schoolers and older, this book examines Linux and its chief architect Linus Torvolds, thousands of programmers who helped develop it, and other brilliant and sometimes bizarre characters like Eric Raymond and Richard Stallman. It tells the story of "free" software as an alternative to all proprietary software.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Roar! A Noisy Counting Book

Authored By: Pamela Duncan Edwards and Henry Cole

Published: May 2000

While the older lions nap, a cub wanders off looking for a friend to play with but frightens everyone, from one red monkey to eight brown gazelles, with his over-sized roar until he finally meets nine other cubs. What a racket they make! Preschoolers and beginning readers will enjoy the rhyming couplets and Cole's bug-eyed critters.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Sacred Geometry: Deciphering the Code

Authored By: Stephen Skinner

Published: November 2006

In this generously illustrated celebration of geometry, the author first looks at the work of Pythagoras and Euclid, and then he reveals the geometry in the natural and in the man-made world. Plenty of photos, drawings, charts, and sidebars explain the underlying math.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Sacred Number: The Secret Quality of Quantities

Authored By: Miranda Lundy

Published: September 2005

This small, beautifully illustrated book looks at counting systems, numbers considered significant in religions, and numbers in architecture. It examines number quality in astronomy, geometry, and music. It includes appendices with additional information and a glossary of number.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Schrodinger's Rabbits: Entering the Many Worlds Of Quantum

Authored By: Colin Bruce

Published: October 2004

The author, who trained as a mathematical physicist and who has written other popular books explaining physics and mathematics, takes on the quantum world. Is quantum mechanics as weird as it has been presented? Is it necessary to believe in randomness, long-range spooky forces, or life and death determined by observation? The author believes not. He critiques some of the current explanations then espouses a more elegant answer, that we live in a multiverse and that countless versions of reality exist side-by-side.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Science of Illusions, The

Authored By: Jacques Ninio

Published: June 2001

A six-page inventory of illusions, some as familiar as hearing the ocean in a seashell, others as strange as an arctic explorer mistaking a walrus for a mountain, opens this exploration of illusions. Ninio is an international authority on visual perception. He demonstrates that illusions reveal the methods used by the brain to interpret sensory information. He gives examples of different types of illusions, including segregations, fusions, completions, creations, adaptations, constancies, reference points, and arbitrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Second Is a Hiccup, A

Authored By: Hazel Hutchins

Published: March 2007

How long is a second, minute, hour, day, week, month, year? Adults consult their watches, clocks, and calendars, but what about kids? This book translates standard units of time into familiar units — the time required to complete common activities such as jumping rope, healing abrasions, learning to walk. Have your students suggest their own.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Secret Life of Numbers: 50 Easy Pieces on How Mathematicians Work and Think

Authored By: George G. Szpiro

Published: March 2006

Mathematics doesn’t just appear in textbooks, it is done by people. Many of the pieces in this collection put the faces on the math. Fifty brief chapters introduce Bernoulli, Hilbert Poincare, Fermat, and others and cover subjects from the extra .242199 of a day we accumulate each year to Bible codes. The last section shows math in action in the sciences and everyday life.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Sensational Shape Problems and Other Puzzles

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: December 2005

This collection of 82 mathematical puzzles features geometry in two and three dimensions. Many problems involve tangrams, transformations, dissections, perfect squares, and packing. You’ll find logic puzzles too. All puzzles are full-page and in bright colors. The answers are at the end of the book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Shoelace Problem & Other Puzzles, The

Authored By: Ivan Moscovich

Published: November 2004

The 89 puzzles in this collection encourage creative thinking and build problem solving skills. Test your spatial and logical reasoning, ability to sequence, shape recognition, estimation, and more. Puzzles are full page and often in color. The answers are grouped in a final section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Sir Cumference and the Knights of the Round Table

Authored By: Cindy Neuschwander and Wayne Geehan

Published: February 1999

Readers age 4-8 are transported into an Arthurian math adventure when they have to help Sir Cumference and his knights find a meeting table. The rectangular table they'd used was too long and the knights had to shout to be heard; a geometric odyssey ensues when Sir Cumference, his wife Lady Di of Ameter, and their son Radius search for the perfect solution.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Six Days in October: The Stock Market Crash of 1929 (Wall Street Journal Book)

Authored By: Karen Blumenthal

Published: September 2002

This historical investigation recounts the events of October 24-30, 1929. Sidebars explain what stocks are, what the New York Stock Exchange is, what bulls and Bears are, and other stock market terminology. The book is liberally illustrated with archival photos; contemporary cartoons, poems, and songs; and other artifacts. It includes a section on sources.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Six Foolish Fishermen

Authored By: Robert D. San Souci and Douglas Kennedy

Published: May 2000

When Jules, Jacques, Jean, Ti-Paul, Philippe, and Pierre set out for a day of fishing in Louisiana bayou country, they discover they have only three poles and three cans of bait. Since no one has both pole and bait, they decide no one can fish. Grandmaman suggests a solution, but these silly friends manage to misunderstand, over and over again. Children 4-8 will enjoy discovering the errors of counting and logic in this Cajun "noodle" tale.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Slicing Pizzas, Racing Turtles, and Further Adventures in Applied Mathematics

Authored By: Robert B. Banks

Published: September 1999

How can you slice a pizza to get the most slices with the fewest cuts? If you want to keep your head dry, should you walk or run in the rain? What is the length of the seam on a baseball? This challenging book for high school students and older presents the mathematics behind everyday phenomena.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Smokejumpers One to Ten

Authored By: Chris L. Demarest

Published: June 2002

Smokejumpers are men and women who parachute into remote areas to fight fires. This counting book counts from one to ten and back to zero featuring dynamic scenes from the lives of smokejumpers, from a fire’s beginnings in one lightening strike to zero fires spotted and the smokejumpers’ return to base. Demarest’s experience as a volunteer fireman contributes authenticity to his illustrations. The book ends with pages of additional information and a bibliography.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Snowflake: Winter's Secret Beauty, The

Authored By: Kenneth Libbrecht and Patricia Rasmussen

Published: November 2003

Cutting snowflakes from paper is a yearly activity in art and math classes to illustrate the concept of symmetry. This beautifully photographed homage to the flake provides scores of images, a chapter on symmetry, and a field guide to falling snow to help you distinguish between stellar dendrites and sectored plates.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Speed Mathematics: Secrets Skills for Quick Calculation

Authored By: Bill Handley

Published: October 2003

Handley once taught a young boy some of the mathematical strategies in this book before he entered first grade, and the boy was treated like a prodigy all the way through school. Is the ability to do math quickly important? The author believes so and lists seven reasons, the most important being that we use math every day. Speed math is a non-technical book that anyone can use. Each chapter contains examples. Practice and you will beat a calculator too.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Spunky Monkeys on Parade

Authored By: Stuart J. Murphy and Lynne Woodcock Cravath

Published: September 1999

A colorful parade of cycling, cartwheeling, and marching monkeys helps teach children 4-8 how to count by twos, threes, and fours. The picture book also suggests additional learning activities, concept extensions, and other books that present similar concepts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds

Authored By: Bruce Frey

Published: May 2006

The word “hack” in the title refers to a clever way to get something done. Chance is a part of life. Understanding of statistics can help you solve problems that arise because of chance. The first chapters provide the basics. The hacks follow for discovering relationships, measuring the world, beating the odds, playing games, and thinking smart. Seventy-five hacks are clearly presented with tips and examples, illustrations, and recommendations for further reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Statistics without Tears: A Primer for Non-Mathematicians

Authored By: Derek Rowntree

Published: June 2003

If math isn’t your forte but you still need to understand statistics, then Rowntree’s introduction is a good start. He promises that his book will explain with words and diagrams so that students from other subject areas can see the statistical forest and not the computational trees. And he delivers.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Struck by Lightning: The Curious World of Probabilities

Authored By: Jeffrey S. Rosenthal

Published: April 2006

It may be true that you can’t win a lottery unless you play, but you’re still more likely to die in a car crash on your way to buy a ticket. If you’re curious about the likely and the unlikely in life, Rosenthal has written an entertaining explanation of probability for a general audience. What are your chances of winning at roulette or poker? How can you use statistics and poll results to make better decisions? How does randomness affect biology? The last chapter is a final exam.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Subtraction (Question of Math)

Authored By: Sheila Cato

Published: August 1999

The same author who helped students in K-3 learn about counting, addition, and other basic math skills helps them learn subtraction.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Symmetry and the Monster: The Story of One of the Greatest Quests of Mathematics

Authored By: Mark Ronan

Published: May 2006

The Monster of Symmetry is one of the four big challenges in mathematics. The Monster is a giant snowflake in 196,883 dimensions. The search for the Monster began with Evariste Galois in France in the 1830s. The author, who knows all the modern searchers, tells a fascinating story about an esoteric mathematics that could shed light on the deep physical form of the universe.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Symmetry: The Ordering Principle

Authored By: David Wade

Published: October 2006

This small, well-illustrated book looks at symmetry in nature and art architecture, science, mathematics, and our ideas of morality and justice. The book opens with a discussion of congruence, periodicity, rotation, and reflection.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Sync: The Emerging Science of Spontaneous Order

Authored By: Steven Strogatz

Published: March 2003

In 1665, Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens noticed that pendulums in two clocks close to each other would oscillate in unison. If he mixed up the swings, they would return to consonance with a half hour. In Malaysia, thousands of fireflies have been observed flashing in unison. Sync explains the tendency for the organic and inorganic to synchronize, from schooling fish to traffic jams. The author, a professor of applied mathematics at Cornell University, is a pioneer in the new science of synchrony.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Teeth, Tails, & Tentacles: An Animal Counting Book

Authored By: Christopher Wormell

Published: August 2004

Count from one to twenty horns, humps, legs, spots, and more in the animal kingdom. Wormell’s bold and colorful linoleum-block prints are followed by a section giving more information about each featured creature.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Ten in the Bed

Authored By: Anne Geddes

Published: October 2000

Based on a traditional children's rhyme, this picture book for Preschool-K opens with ten sleeping babies in colorful costumes. In turn, each baby moves to the bottom of the bed. At the conclusion, all the babies are reunited. Turn the book over and read it again. Read one way, and the last lonely baby is a girl. Read the other way, and the last is a boy. The book's ingenious design and Geddes's familiar way with infants will make this book a winner with young children.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Ten Little Mummies: An Egyptian Counting Book

Authored By: Philip Yates and G. Brian Karas

Published: September 2003

Ten Egyptian mummies are bored stiff so they decide to leave their tomb and have some fun. Kids can count down from ten to one with this rhyming picture book. Interesting pyramid facts are included inside the covers.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Ten Mice for Tet

Authored By: Pegi Deitz Shea, Cynthia Weill and To Ngoc Trang, Pham Viet-Dinh

Published: November 2003

Tet is the Vietnamese New Year. Count from one to ten and learn about Vietnamese new year customs. A concluding section provides more information about Tet. The illustrations are unusual in that they were first drawn and then embroidered. Chuc Mung Nam Moi! Happy New Year!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Ten Things All Future Mathematicians and Scientists Must Know (But are Rarely Taught), The

Authored By: Edward Zaccaro

Published: March 2003

The author presents ten crucial ideas fundamental to clear thinking. They are stated simply in an introduction and then separately treated in ten chapters. Each chapter examines instances culled from recent headlines when the rule was not applied. For example, Chapter 3 on Occam’s Razor looks at Clever Hans, Cold Fusion, Big Foot, and Crop Circles. Chapters include discussion questions and problems to solve. Answers are provided. This book belongs in every math and science classroom.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Ten Times Better

Authored By: Richard Michelson and Leonard Baskin

Published: September 2000

This counting book in verse for children 4-8 furnishes information about common and uncommon animals as it illustrates the concept of multiplying by ten. A three-toed sloth brags about his toes until a centipede points out his thirty feet are ten times better. Baskin provides humorous pictures to accompany Michelson's witty verse. The book includes additional facts, questions and answers about each animal, and an index.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Time Math

Authored By: Kieran Walsh

Published: July 2006

Explore time and the math used to measure it. This book looks at clocks, time zones, units of time, and calendars. It includes a glossary and recommends books and websites for the curious.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Top Secret: A Handbook of Codes, Ciphers, and Secret Writing

Authored By: Paul B. Janeczko and Jenna LaReau

Published: April 2004

This introduction to secret communication techniques begins with a discussion of the non-secret codes we encounter everyday: barcodes, zip codes, ISBNs, pictographs, and others. Sections treat codemaking, ciphers, codebreaking, concealment, and a Hall of Fame of super code makers and breakers. The enthusiastic will find a list for further reading.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Triumph of Numbers: How Counting Shaped Modern Life, The

Authored By: I.B. Cohen

Published: April 2005

In this history of statistics, Cohen looks at how numbers have taken a leading role in science, government, marketing, sports, and many other aspects of modern life. He examines the Age of Reason and the birth of science, numerology and mystic philosophy, statistics, and critics of statistics. The book is written for a general audience.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Turtle Splash: Countdown at the Pond

Authored By: Cathryn Falwell

Published: August 2001

Told in verse, this picture book opens with ten timid turtles lounging in a line. One by one, the turtles are startled by other pond inhabitants and splash into the water. Children count backward from 10 to one. A final section called "Life at the Pond" introduces the ten creature actors in the story.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Tuxedo Park: A Wall Street Tycoon and the Secret Palace of Science That Changed the Course of World War II

Authored By: Jennet Conant

Published: May 2002

Alfred Loomis was a successful businessman who knew how to make money and how to protect it. He anticipated the stock market crash of 1929 and made a fortune while most lost theirs. He also had an interest in science. During World War II, Loomis used his influence and urged FDR to spend millions in developing radar. This account focuses on his secret life promoting science in his private lab at Tuxedo Park where figures like Einstein, Heisenberg, Franck, Bohr, and Fermi met. He also set up a lab at MIT recruiting the great names in physics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Twelve Days of Kindergarten: A Counting Book, The

Authored By: Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis

Published: August 2003

Follow eight kindergarteners through their first twelve days of school. Count from one to twelve. Count the familiar classroom objects. Armstrong-Ellis’s illustrations are humorous, develop multiple storylines, and create recognizable student types, from the boy whose finger is always up his nose (or the class frog’s) to the girl who is constantly drawing horses.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Universal Book of Mathematics: From Abracadabra to Zeno's Paradoxes, The

Authored By: David Darling

Published: August 2004

This desktop encyclopedia has more than 1800 entries covering everyday and esoteric mathematics, theorems, biographies, puzzles, games, and humor. All puzzles posed have solutions. Serious students will find a large reference section for further reading. Teachers will find a category index to select entries for classroom study.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Universal History of Numbers: From Prehistory to the Invention of the Computer, The

Authored By: Georges Ifrah

Published: November 1999

The author, a former math teacher, quit his teaching post and devoted the next ten years of his life to travel and research to answer the fundamental and disconcerting questions of mathematics innocently posed one morning by his students. The result of his labors is this monumental history, 663 two-column pages packed with illustrations, of counting and calculating. Clearly written and translated from the French, this book will make an excellent reference for middle school students and older and belongs in every school library.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Unknown Quantity: A Real and Imaginary History of Algebra

Authored By: John Derbyshire

Published: May 2006

This is a comprehensive history of algebra for the general reader comfortable with mathematics. The story begins four thousand years ago in Mesopotamia with problems incised on cuneiform tablets and concludes with Alexander Grothendieck and algebraic geometry. The author provides periodic math primers to aid the reader in understanding concepts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Uno's Garden

Authored By: Graeme Base

Published: September 2006

This is a counting book with an ecological theme. When Uno arrives in the forest, animals and plants thrive. His decision to live there leads to an influx of settlers and the degradation of the environment. Each page records the decline of plants and animals. Kids can tally the losses in Base's incredibly detailed illustrations. Have no fear, change for the better comes. Base is an optimist.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd Edition, The

Authored By: Edward R. Tufte

Published: January 2001

This look at statistical graphics surveys two centuries of graphical practice, both the good and the bad and then sets out a practical theory of data graphics--how to best communicate information through words, numbers, and pictures. This is a fascinating and beautifully produced book.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions

Authored By: Lisa Randall

Published: September 2005

Randall is the first tenured woman theoretical physicist at MIT and Harvard University. She is an expert in particle physics, string theory, and cosmology. She is coauthor of the two most important scientific papers on string and supersymmetry theory. In this book directed to a general audience, she presents an overview of physics through the 20th century to the present. She has a knack for using analogies to make complex mathematical concepts, including additional spatial dimensions, understandable.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Water Hole, The

Authored By: Graeme Base

Published: September 2001

Take a round the world safari and count to ten, then carefully search the pages for hidden animals. Base has hidden details everywhere: in the parched Australian outback, in the Indian jungle, in a drop of water. Follow the waterhole as it dries up and is finally replenished when rain returns. The book features a cutout waterhole that gets smaller with every two-page spread.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Web Menus with Beauty and Brains

Authored By: Wendy Peck

Published: December 2001

If you’re into Web design at school or at home, this book will help develop your skills in one important area. Well-designed menus are the key to successful sites. If you doubt this statement, wait until you encounter a poorly designed menu. This guide provides creative advice, checklists, and hands-on examples. The book includes a CD-ROM with templates, examples, and Web-design software.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World

Authored By: Derrick Niederman and David Boyum

Published: April 2003

Learning how to interpret all the quantitative information we encounter each day can make the difference between making a wise or foolish decision. From cereal boxes to Olympic judging, numbers say it all. Or do they? Any doubts about the usefulness of the book should be dispelled by the second chapter: “The Ten Habits of Highly Effective Quantitative Thinkers.”

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

What Time Is It, Mr. Crocodile?

Authored By: Judy Sierra and Doug Cushman

Published: August 2004

Mr. Crocodile plans his day from wakeup to bedtime. The book opens with his schedule, which lists hourly activities from 9 AM to 8 PM, including the catching, cooking, and eating of five pesky monkeys. Each two-page spread features a prominent analog clock showing the hour so young clock readers can follow the day’s progress. Though Mr. Crocodile plans to eat the monkeys who torment him, he decides in the end they make better friends.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

What's a Pair? What's a Dozen?

Authored By: Stephen R. Swinburne

Published: February 2000

This picture book for children 4-8 introduces number concepts and some associated vocabulary. For example, two, pair, couple, and the prefix bi- are illustrated with photographs of two objects, either children or things that will interest children. The last third of the book tests for understanding.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

What's Cookin'?

Authored By: Nancy Coffelt

Published: March 2003

One at a time, ten cooks enter a kitchen to contribute their skills to a tremendous birthday cake, and as the cake bakes, they all pitch in to clean up. The author has provided three concluding sections on cooking with children, math in the kitchen, and recipes for a cake and two different frostings.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

What's Your Angle, Pythagoras?: A Math Adventure

Authored By: Julie Ellis and Phyllis Hornung

Published: April 2004

Young Pythagoras overhears two workmen complaining their ladder is too short to reach the roof of the temple that they are working on. This conversation starts Pythagoras on a series of investigations of tilting temple columns, direct sailing routes, stonecutting, and square tiles which culminates in his understanding of the properties of the right triangle. This is an entertaining and effective presentation of the Pythagorean theorem.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

When Least Is Best: How Mathematicians Discovered Many Clever Ways to Make Things as Small (or as Large) as Possible

Authored By: Paul J. Nahin

Published: November 2003

This book describes two millennia of mathematics in extrema. It is a technical book. The author expects readers to have some background in physics and calculus and to read with pencil and paper in hand. That said, he engages readers in a fascinating examination of how life works at the extremes of the very small and the very large. He includes many examples and problems.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Where Mathematics Comes From: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being

Authored By: George Lakoff and Rafael Nuez

Published: October 2000

This book for serious math students in high school or beyond argues that most ideas are unconscious, that abstract ideas arise through conceptual metaphors-mechanisms for projecting concrete reasoning into abstract reasoning. It even tries to answer the age-old question: how can a being with a finite brain comprehend infinity. Sections cover basic arithmetic; algebra, logic, and sets; infinity; space and motion; and the philosophy of mathematics. The final section contains four case studies. The book includes extensive references.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Wild Fibonacci: Nature's Secret Code Revealed

Authored By: Joy N. Hulme and Carol Schwartz

Published: August 2005

In the Fibonacci sequence, each term is the sum of the two previous terms, as in: 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,…. The sequence traces a curve found in nature in plants and animals. In this book, it is the tiger’s claw, ram’s horn, and sea shells. The book follows the generation of the sequence up to 89 and illustrates its occurrence in animals.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Wonders of Numbers: Adventures in Math, Mind, and Meaning

Authored By: Clifford A. Pickover

Published: December 2000

Math fans, middle school and up, can join Dr. Googol and explore the world of numbers. This book contains 125 chapters covering topics as varied as fractals, the five strangest mathematicians, saippuakauppias (a Finnish word meaning seller of soap and the world's longest palindrome), and Zen archery.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Yearning for the Impossible: The Surprising Truths of Mathematics

Authored By: John Stillwell

Published: June 2006

Some rise to the challenge of attempting the impossible. The author examines the history of mathematics focusing on the quest for doing the impossible. Chapters address the irrational, imaginary, horizon, infinitesimal, curved space, fourth dimension, ideal, periodic space, and the infinite.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math

Zen of Magic Squares, Circles, and Stars: An Exhibition of Surprising Structures across Dimensions, The

Authored By: Clifford A. Pickover

Published: January 2002

The ancient Chinese, Babylonians, and Mayas were convinced magic squares held the secrets of the universe. Magic squares are arrays filed with numbers or letters in particular arrangements. The introduction to this hefty study explains what magic squares are and provides a brief history of their importance in different cultures. The bulk of the book is an amazing study of a variety of constructions and the people who created them.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Book

Subject: Math