PBS Teachers™

PBS Teachers

The Arts

recommended links archive

"This exhibition offers an introduction to the Kuna, who live on San Blas Island off the coast of Panama. Molas are made by Kuna women from layers of appliqud fabric, sometimes depicting the natural world but also the modern world including a basketball game. Click on any of the clothing hanging on the lines and get a closer look at the back and front of these decorated blouses. A short description and activity show how molas are made. You can use construction paper to create your own mola. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Looking for ways to bring art and art history into your teaching? The @rt Room is a 'virtual' art classroom that features hands on art lessons, activities and games that are not only educational, but lots of fun. Also included is a student gallery, bibliography, links and art trivia."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This exhibition explores the historical, emotional and sociological influences that have influenced disabled artists’ expressions. “Disability as Content” is a section where disabled artists strive to portray disabled people as part of society, purposely portraying the disability in the image. The “Methods and Materials” sections include the art forms of painting, printmaking, sculpture, glasswork, jewelry, computer programming, and mixed media. Other exhibitions from disabled artists are also found at this site from VSA, formerly called Very Special Arts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Artist’s Toolkit focuses on visual elements and principles such as line, shape, space, movement, color, and balance. Each element is introduced with an animated demonstration, examples from various museums, and an opportunity to create your own composition. There are profiles of 2 artists in action. The encyclopedia provides an in-depth guide to these elements and principles. Animations and a variety of images provide useful aids in understanding concepts such as negative space and three different types of balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical, and radial. This site is not to be missed by art teachers and students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Blue Highway serves as a tribute to 20 great bluesmakers: Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, W.C. Handy, and Leadbelly. You’ll find essays, news, links, and bluescasts. In Muddy’s Cabin, you need Java, then pull up a chair and chat with other blues enthusiasts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The portraits from this Smithsonian collection date from the 1720s to the 1990s. The 76 paintings vary in style and technique and form a narrative about American portraiture in all its variety. Compare the styles through the decades and decide which appeals to you. The educational resources found at this site are lesson plans based on the historical aspect of the portraits. Each portrait includes a short biography of the subject.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution has industrial drawings and patent illustrations of inventors, engineers, and others who created something as small as a device to measure shoe size to the hydraulic scheme for Niagara Falls power generating plant. The Innovator’s Gallery introduces you to some people who have made an impact on your life: Binney and Smith created Crayola crayons, Earl Tupper created Tupperware, and Ida Rosenthal, a seamstress who founded Maidenform. All these inventors use drawings to document their ideas."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This award winning Web site is dedicated to grade 4-12 drama teachers and includes a variety of resources: lesson plans, backstage activities/archives, production ideas, support, other drama links, and educator seminar information."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"A collection of stereoscopic immigration photos, housed at the California Museum of Photography, features images taken at Ellis Island, expositions, and immigrant labor in coal mines and agricultural fields. The site suggests the photographs indicate an attitude of nationalism and anti-immigration over the past century. Note especially the images from world's fairs where villagers were exhibited and examined as if they were specimens. Each photo includes its original inscription."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"You may have heard a bagpipe and a lute played but how about a Shofar, Psaltery, or a Sacbut? This site provides a description, photos, sound files, and additional resources for more than 30 instruments from the Musica Antiqua's (Iowa State University) collection of 12th to 17th century instruments. An additional benefit is that the musicians portrayed in the photos are in clothing of the period. A great resource for Medieval and Renaissance projects in school."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Canadian Museum of Civilization houses many Haida artifacts. The style and quality is distinctive, whether painted on cedar or carved of stone. Tour this exhibit to learn more about the significance and beauty of the totem poles, masks, copper shields, baskets, and storage chests. The mythology of the people is depicted in the form of crests, usually animals such as Raven, the trickster. Profiles of many artists are included, with examples of their work. You might want to view pages from the Index page, so you won’t miss any of the sections."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"John and Ruby Lomax traveled 6500 miles in 1939 to record folk songs mostly in Texas, but also Louisiana, Florida, Georgia, and other southern states. They carried their recording equipment in the trunk of the car. This Library of Congress collection is supplemented with photos, fieldnotes, audio clips, and biographies of the Lomaxes. Some of the song genres include prison work songs, lullabies, blues, spirituals, farm calls, and humorous songs. Of the over 300 songs, about 100 are in Spanish. The Library of Congress Learning Page has a site for teachers and students related to the Lomax collection at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/collections/lomax/ . Audio is in MP3 format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Moshe Rynecki (1881-1943) was forced into the Warsaw Ghetto (Poland) in 1939 and later deported to a concentration camp in Majdanek where he died. This site features some of his surviving paintings of Jewish life in prewar Poland. They capture a culture that has been lost to the holocaust and modern ways.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The feature instrument in this virtual museum is the guitar as well as other 19th and 20th century musical instruments. View the special collections to see beautiful examples of Spanish guitars, Dreadnoughts which are the model for today's standard acoustic guitar, and guitars of the Singing Cowboys. Online exhibitions about famous guitar players include Woody Guthrie, Mark Twain, and Django Reinhardt. Other exhibition themes are the guitar as works of art, music in film, and the shape of guitars. Flash 6 is required for slide shows and RealOne Player is required to hear Jukebox selections. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"PapaInk seeks to archive children’s artwork by providing an open digital archive to submit and display pieces for the world to view, and promote children’s creativity. There is also a section of current adult artists’ artwork from their own childhood. Within the Historical Art collection are examples from children during World War II, recent conflicts in Rwanda, Afghanistan, Bosnia, and reflections of Sept. 11. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Did you ever wonder how pencils are made? And just how do they get those little erasers on each one? Click through the Great Eraser Caper to see how. This site offers little known facts about pencils, like why they are traditionally yellow. Additional resources are provided for those sharpening their pencil knowledge."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Allentown (PA) Art Museum takes you back 500 years to the Renaissance to investigate the arts and innovations. In addition to over 30 works of art from the Renaissance, components include interactive activities, maps, a glossary, and a timeline Find out about the life of an artist and what it meant to be a patron of the arts. Your virtual accountant will advise you on what you can afford. The humorous graphic design may remind you of Monty Python. Middle school lesson plans are included. The site is available in Flash and text versions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Want to find information about paper recycling, paper consumption per capita, and the history of papermaking? The Web site for the Robert C. Williams American Museum of Papermaking is a one-stop shop for all kinds of paper-related information. While the site might be enhanced with papermaking recipes or activities for kids, it does provide a lot of valuable background information and useful statistics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

This site allows students to learn more about the symphony and its instruments though online games and information pages.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Sunshine Online offers a terrific lesson plan which lets students investigate the history of how writing and books began. Students also have the option of writing and publishing their own stories.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This incredible site assembled by David Brooks of Toronto, Canada contains more than 2,830 pages and 2,775 graphics, 100% of Vincent van Gogh's works (2,211 paintings, sketches, letter sketches, watercolors), a complete, online catalogue raisonn`e of Van Gogh's oeuvre! Provides a site overview, a chronological and thematic index to his works, biographical and other resources, links to recent news stories from around the world, and free downloads."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"VKP pairs artist-instructors with high school educators to explore new ways of integrating contemporary art with math, science, social studies, language arts, and other core high school curricula. The curriculum units can be found on their Web site in PDF format and schools are invited to set up online classrooms, post recommended readings, upload students' work and communicate with other classrooms all on the VKP Web site! VKP is an educational outreach and curriculum development program based at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This collection from the Smithsonian Institution houses glass, fiber, wood, metal, and ceramic pieces from the 1990s. You can tour the White House by room or by medium of art. Each piece of artwork has images, a description and an artist profile. Some artists also have answers to questions related to their work. QuickTime or Vivo Player is required for the video tours and RealPlayer is required for the audio clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This Library of Congress exhibit spotlights eight women who succeeded in “coming to the front” during the war including Therese Bonney, Toni Frissell, and May Craig. Their stories tell how women’s role as war correspondents in the field and on the home front grew during the war years although it took decades to regain those advances after women made way for returning veterans."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Professor serves as your guide to the collections of this Japanese museum as you visit the virtual exhibits about paintings, ceramics, lacquerware, textiles, calligraphy and other special exhibits. Some of the interesting pieces you’ll see are the lion-dogs which guard temples, pagodas, and painted scrolls. For a real puzzle, decipher the good luck motifs on the dragon robe in Textiles. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Mod clothes! Hip patterns! England gave the world the Beatles in the 1960s, but they also gave us paper dresses, mini skirts and Carnaby Street fashion. This site from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London provides images, videos, and interviews with designers about 1960s clothing and fabrics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Egyptian, Greek, Islamic, and Romanesque architecture are presented in categories of locality, subject, and time periods with a series of thumbnail images that are clicked to reveal a full screen size photo. Originally an Italian site, the English version also links to 1200 Years of Sculpture."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"You have probably heard of the Louvre in Paris but how about the Prado? This art museum is in Madrid, Spain, and is the foremost museum of Spanish artists such as Velazquez, Goya, El Greco, and Murillo. Other artists represented include Bosch, Rembrandt, Durer, and Van Dyck. This online tour takes you through many of the rooms by clicking on a floor map or by selecting to view the list of artists. Each painting can be enlarged and has a paragraph or two describing the painting, the style, and information about how to view the painting, such as how the lighting, composition, and color work together. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Visit the @rtroom for “sparklers” (ideas) on sketching, collage, watercolors and other media. Find suggestions on how to think like an artist or browse through the library stacks for books about art and artists. The Teacher Resources area has advice for teaching drawing and painting to children and also recommendations for keeping the classroom safe and hazard-free."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Students grade 4 and up learn about famous artists, composition, style, and perspective as they play A. Pintura, a 1940s noir detective who helps Miss Featherduster identify a mystery painting. This interactive online activity is accompanied by a vocabulary list and study sheet. Eduweb's ""Inside Art"" also focuses on these topics and is linked from the above URL."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Examples of illustrated books from the fifteenth century to modern times are displayed at this online exhibit. Samples include illuminations from Book of Hours, Aesop’s Fables, and Salvador Dali’s illustrations of Don Quijote de la Mancha. Color images and a map from the eruption of Vesuvius give detail seen at the time of the eruption. In addition to European illustrations, there are several Japanese and Chinese illustrations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This Library of Congress site provides ""song sheets"" (lyrics without music) for more than 4000 songs that were popular from 1850-1870."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The purpose of this project is to bring dance to the Web. 170 terms from the Technical Manual and Dictionary of Classical Ballet (Dover Publications) are shown, as are still images and video to illustrate each definition. There is also a pronunciation guide for most French terms. You must have the Quicktime Plug-in installed to be able to use some of this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"At the National Gallery of Art, tour a virtual exhibit of American Impressionists with paintings by Childe Hassam, Maurice Prendergast, John Singer Sargent, John Twatchman and other artists. The exhibit includes twelve paintings, descriptions of the artworks and biographies of the artists. There is an essay from the collector of the paintings titled ""Reminiscences and Reflections on Collecting."""

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Reference section of the Andante site allows access to thousands of searchable definitions and biographies from the Concise Grove Dictionary of Music. This reference work covers many types of music, not only classical. You can find information about jazz, rock, the blues, ragtime, and many more styles. The Andante site also provides detailed information about particular composers and analyses of compositions, operas, and some in depth profiles of musicians. There are also some translations of operas. With RealAudio, you can hear clips of music."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This online exhibit from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art highlights seven Ansel Adams photographs. Each section has details about a significant aspect of photography such as composition, lighting, where to stand when taking photos. Learn about the Group f.64, a group of photographers in the 1930s who were interested in progressive photography. Subjects include Yosemite, the seashore, Alaska, and other natural settings for his stunning black and white photos. You can zoom in on the images, rearrange the sequence of the sea foam photos, and even hear Adams in a video clip about his moonrise series. QuickTime and Flash are required for the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Design a house with Frank Lloyd Wright. He thought when building a house, you need to consider two important things, the needs of the people and the particular qualities of the location. Designed for middle school students, the site visitor will learn about architectural design and will create a unique house for a client that is displayed in 3D so you can “walk” through a model of it. You design the interior, exterior and landscaping. Learn more about design by looking through the architect’s handbook. Wright designed over a thousand buildings in his lifetime, some for private homeowners such as “Falling Water” and some for public buildings, which you’ll find in the biography section. Curriculum connections for teachers and librarians are provided. Flash 7 is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"What is it? Look at this piece of sculpture from the Tate Museum in London and with the clues you find and your powers of observation, see if you can figure out what the mysterious object is and how the artist created it. Look at it from various angles and fill in your detective notebook as you learn more about the artwork and artist. Flash 7 is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden invites you to learn about various artists and methods of creating sculpture including figurative, biomorphism (abstract art inspired by nature), geometric, and found objects (assemblage). Create your own sculpture using an interactive program, requiring Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"World War I lasted four years and cost eight million lives. Much of Europe was in ruins, and civilians suffered for years. This gallery collects 100 paintings from international artists to commemorate the end of the war. You can take a guided tour or choose to view paintings by artist or by subject. Take time to read the quotes that accompany most of the paintings, you'll be hearing the voices of soldiers, artists, authors, and other eyewitnesses."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The National Postal Museum brings the tiny format of a stamp to your screen in vivid color so you can study the graphic design, theme, color, and composition of stamps from the past few decades. Click on the Artwork section to browse by topic. Each example has a short description, and some have more detailed resources like those found in “Stamps with a Story.” Compare the 2002 Love stamp found here along with variations that didn’t end up on a stamp, with the other Love stamps. Which of the Bugs Bunny stamps would you have rather seen on your mail? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This interactive adventure in looking will be fun for children, who will learn to analyze famous works of art and write about them. Plus, they can make their own pictures online and view the art work of other students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Part portal and part collection of articles about famous paintings and painters, the Artcyclopedia is the first place to start looking if you are searching for art related material. The site indexes and organizes over a thousand museum and fine arts related sites to provide access to authoritative online resources. An interesting feature is the Top 30, which is a monthly ranking of the 30 most popular artists and 30 most popular works of art searched by users of the site. A glossary with hundreds of terms is provided. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Szyk, born in Poland, became a United States citizen in 1948 and uses patriotic symbols such as the Liberty Bell, bald eagle, soldier and sailor. The theme of freedom is central to his work on political cartoons, war time publications, and illuminations. Specific examples are the portrayal of St. George as a soldier, the personification of Poland, fighting the Nazi dragon and illuminations of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. The site is from the Library of Congress and presents almost 20 examples of Szyk's work. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The InfoZone provides a dictionary, audio clips of an orchestra, teacher guides on Vivaldi and Beethoven, as well as information about other composers including Gershwin, Haydn, and Stavinsky. The Instrument Lab lets you “pick up” and turn an instrument around to see all sides and listen to a clip of the instrument being played. The Orchestra Pit lets you view an interview with a musician. Activities & Games has matching, guessing the composer or instrument, and other games. RealPlayer, QuickTime, and Flash are required for some sections of the site. Activity sheets are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The mission of ArtsEdge is to help artists, teachers and students gain access to and/or share information, resources and ideas that support the arts as a core subject area in the K-12 curriculum. Teachers will find thorough information on current issues in arts education, curriculum resources and even an online arts community. ArtsEdge is developed under a cooperative agreement between the Kennedy Center and the National Endowment for the Arts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Taking photographs of deep-sky astronomical images is a complex process. This astrophotographer instructs readers how to set up the proper equipment and experiment with different exposures to get good photographs. Focusing on objects in the night sky billions of miles away is not an easy task. Light, composition, film, lenses, telescopes, and filters all play a part in creating a high quality photo of the cosmos. The photographer also discusses the ethics of digital enhancement"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Watch the scroll unroll as the story of Commodore Matthew Perry arriving in feudal Japan in 1853 on warships under a cloud of black smoke. The “Core Exhibit” presents Japanese and American images, usually side by side, showing how each side depicted the other and the same events from their different perspectives. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Follow Cappy the giraffe and do art activities that will get you to look at art in a new way. Make art using everyday objects, learn how color can show mood, and meet some artists along the way. Learn how these American artists create their work and view some of the pieces in the collection at the National Museum of American Art."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"In 1944 the Harmon Foundation “organized an exhibition Portraits of Outstanding Americans of Negro Origin, with the express goal of reversing racial intolerance, ignorance and bigotry by illustrating the accomplishments of contemporary African Americans.” Some of the names are well known today, such as George Washington Carver and Paul Robeson, but other names like Jane Bolin, the first black woman in the United States to be appointed to a judgeship, and Paul Williams, early African American architect, are not as well known. Each portrait has a short biography of the person."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Center for the Study of Political Graphics “collects, preserves, and exhibits posters relating to historical and contemporary movements for social change.” This organization houses over 50,000 posters of post WWII graphics in the United States. The virtual exhibitions you can browse on the site are about international ecology, the Labor Movement, the Women of Juárez (where hundreds of women have been tortured and murdered), homelessness, and a Rogues Gallery of Presidents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The United States Air Force Heritage of America Band plays patriotic songs including Taps, Stars and Stripes Forever, and the National Anthem. The Amazing Grace version is played on bag pipes. Other songs are a variety of marches, bugle calls, service songs of the Air Force, Army, Marines, Navy, and Coast Guard, and honors for the President and other officials. If you are looking for possible combinations of songs for morning or evening colors or parades, you'll find ideas here. Useful technical information about downloading is provided. Clips can be saved with MP3 and RealAudio and are used for downloading rather than streaming. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The cathedral of Chartres in Northern France is noted for its beautiful stained glass windows and sculpture. Click on the interactive diagrams of the stained glass windows for details and descriptions. The diagrams categorize the specific images as New or Old Testament, the Saints, Apostles, or other themes. There are also floor plans, manuscripts, sculptural details, and mason’s marks. For some, Chartres was the beginning of the pilgrimage route ending in Santiago de Compostela."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Meet artist Childe Hassam at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Hassam was born just before the Civil War and died in 1935. The timeline shows what inventions were introduced and world events related to the artist’s life. In the “Look Closer” section, get a guided view of a garden, winter in Union Square, and Avenue of the Allies. Shapes and movement are brought to attention. The activities highlight sounds Hassam might have heard, a short crossword puzzle, and flag facts.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The basic Chinese brush techniques are described, including different brushes and their uses. Other materials discussed are ink, paper, and silk. Color, composition and space, seals and calligraphy are also presented. The most common subjects of Chinese paintings are landscapes, flowers and birds, and people. Advice is offered for “rules” of painting from ancient Chinese masters. From the technique page, you can link to art history, ancient and contemporary artists, and see Chinese wood block and embroidery samples."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Go through the steps of making a film from the screenwriting to directing, producing, acting, and finally editing. Hands on activities include writing part of a comedy script and managing a budget as the producer. Several glossaries, some background on blacklisting, and a lengthy bibliography enhance the content of the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"A timeline tour guides you through the early years of the Motown Sound. Featured legends include The Commodores, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder. Browse through the timeline for major events, hear clips of songs in the Jukebox, and read features on young Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. If people want to know where you found this site, say you heard it on the grapevine."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Can a black rainbow occur at night? Can color suppress your appetite? Find out the answers—and other interesting facts about color and color theory—at Color Matters. Aside from rich content on color theory, there is an excellent list of resources and an unusually helpful discussion board."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Color theory for teachers and students introduces mixing colors and putting colors together in effective ways. Topics covered are color wheels, color values, and color schemes. There are many games and activities to play related to color theory, student artwork, and master paintings to serve as examples. The Teacher Resources include a glossary, lesson ideas, goals, and objectives. Java enabled browsers are required to play some games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This tutorial about color is created by a computer science professor who has information about color for computer graphics students. Topics covered are paint colors, visible light, HSB (hue, saturation, and brightness), greyscale, RGB (red, green, and blue),Web safe colors, CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black), and spot color. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The science of vision and the emergence of art is the subject of this site which investigates how our eyes and light work and how artists over the generations have used color in their paintings. Other topics include peripheral vision, luminance and equiluminance (used to blur outlines and suggest motion). Many of the paintings have a sliding scale for you to experiment with color saturation. There is detailed information about rods and cones in your eyes, egg tempra and oil paints, and the role of varnish in a painting."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Evergreen University’s government documents library has compiled over 50 coloring and activity books from federal agencies including NASA, the Departments of Health and Human Services, the Interior, Commerce, Agriculture, and several others. Most are housed within the university site and are in PDF, others link to the original source and are in HTML. Several are in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Enter the Colour Factory to learn about the color wheel and how to mix colors to create new ones. Learn more about the color wheel in the Sorting Sector, mix paints in the Mixing Room, and then paint online pictures with your freshly mixed paints in the Messy Area."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"A non-partisan, non-profit organization hosts a site rating movies, music, web sites, video games, and television shows. Titles are labeled with ON, OFF, and PAUSE buttons to note whether the reviewers think they are suitable for children, and if so, what age groups should be viewing them. Categories include sex, violence, language, and message (social behavior, commercialism, drug/alcohol/tobacco use). If you are wondering if that PG13 movie is appropriate for your tween, or if you are a kid who wants to show your parents that you should be allowed to see a certain movie, you may want to check this site to get the review of the content to help guide your decision. Kids and adults who register can submit their own ratings. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"""Reminding you that all music was once new,"" the Composer’s Datebook is a short daily radio show aired on many stations, but you can also listen to it at this site. You’ll find historic information from today in history such as birth, death, and premieres anniversaries. There are links to sites about composers and performers of modern music. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Are we alone in the cosmos? The first SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) search was conducted in 1960. The movie Contact, based on the book by Carl Sagan and his wife, Ann Druyan, is a fictional account of what the first contact might be like. The Contact movie website provides factual information about Earth reaching out to the cosmos including the Voyager Recording, Pioneer Plaque, and the Arecibo Message. You’ll also find and interview with Dr. Frank Drake, head of the SETI project and his equation which estimates how many communicating civilizations might be in the universe."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Lesson plans and other teaching resources on design are related to multiple subjects including mathematics, science, environmental studies, language arts, history, and art. Lessons are available from primary grades through high school. The elements of design featured in these resources are observation, research, creative solutions, and presentation and critique. Other teaching resources are suggested titles for curriculum in design and books to use with students. Several videos for teachers are viewable in Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Tour Great Britain's stained glass windows at this site from the British Academy. Browse by country, county, or specific location (usually a church, but also hospitals and schools). Use the search form to look for works in specific building parts, window orientation (north, south, east, west), date (12th century to modern times), and subject (New or Old Testament, saints, etc.).Click on the thumbnail photos to see screen-size stunning color photos of stained glass windows. There are articles about conservation, restoration, and cleaning and an online newsletter titled Vidimus. The glossary defines terms related to decorating, tools, and processes related to stained glass.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"K-6 teachers will enjoy this web site, which offers lesson plans, techniques for using a wide variety of Crayola products, opportunities to win prizes by submitting lesson plans, and a chance to join others in threaded discussions about using Crayola products in the classroom. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This site offers a range of online resources related to traditional arts, folklore, anthropology, and oral history, including RealAudio interviews."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Indianapolis Museum of Art presents African life in a continuous circle of birth, growth, maturity, transition, and rebirth. Browse through the ages of Youth, Adulthood, Leadership, and Ancestors. Each has a glossary, gallery and a clickable map to indicate which part of Africa an object comes from. There is audio commentary for each age as you travel through the circle image. Teacher information has national standards and where each is met within the site. Flash is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"""Dada has never claimed to have anything to do with art."" (Max Ernst, 1920) The National Gallery of Art hosts an online exhibition of Dada artists and their works. In 1916, Dada art emerged as a response to the trauma and violence of the First World War. There is a variety of techniques represented including collage, “readymade”, assemblage, and don’t miss the two sound poems. One of the more famous pieces is the Mona Lisa with a mustache and beard by Marcel Duchamp. Dada is considered by some as absurd and bizarre but brilliant by others. Tour the exhibit and you decide."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Stunning glass sculpture illuminated by sunlight or perfectly aimed lights are the hallmark of Dale Chihuly’s artwork. An artist working in glass, Chihuly is famous for his baskets, seaforms, and ikebana. Part of the site includes his drawings that eventually become works in glass, a fascinating way to look at 2D images becoming vibrant 3D pieces. QuickTime video clips also show short interviews with Chihuly. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Congratulations! You have been accepted to the Martha Graham Dance Company! Open the dancerÂ’s locker to find music and video clips of Graham pieces from Appalachian Spring, Errand into the Maze, Lamentation, and Diversion of Angels. Reading the studentÂ’s cuesheet with notes on preparing for the role, rehearsing, and background information will draw the reader into the story. Teachers will find an envelope with high school lessons exploring GrahamÂ’s choreography. The site requires Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Detroit Institute of the Arts presents an online version of the Degas and the Dance exhibition. The online framing activity, Degas in Perspective, demonstrates his use of point of view, framing and cropping to emphasize specific elements in a scene. Questions are posed to help students think about how and why Degas may have used these techniques. The activity allows students to experiment with editing images and post them in the public gallery. By clicking through the online tour, students will learn more about Degas and his works. Thumbnail images of 28 sketches, drawings, paintings, and sculpture can be expanded for better viewing. Flash is required. Two short videos require QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Paper making artist Denise Fleming hosts a site with many art activities that can be made with household materials. Her books are beautifully illustrated with pictures she makes as part of the paper, known as pulp painting. There are paper plate art projects, coloring pages, snack ideas, and classroom activities to accompany Fleming’s many books. The section on papermaking is geared toward adults and provides great directions and tips on how to make a mold and deckle, mixing the pulp, how to pour, remove, and finally dry the paper. Some instructions are in pdf format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Young virtual museum visitors explore the Museum of Modern Art while viewing works of art by Vincent van Gogh, Romare Bearden, Frida Kahlo, and several other artists. Sound can be turned off or on to narrate directions and text for children. You'll find suggestions for at-home art-making activities, activities that involve poems and stories, and activities that involve looking closer at the art. Flash 6 is required for the entire site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Dox Thrash was an African American master printmaker who lived from 1893 to 1965. Thrash pioneered the technique in printmaking known as carborundum mezzotint. He also used aquatint, drypoint, lithography, etching, woodcut, and linocut. There is an interesting section on how the museum “rescued” a print that had been damaged by age and rubber cement, kind of like forensics for artworks. Text and images from the timeline can be downloaded as PDF documents. Flash is required for the audio comments from the curator."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"William Hogarth is often mentioned as the father of the modern editorial cartoon, creating the art form in the 1700s.Thomas Nast gave us our common image of Santa Claus, the Democratic Donkey, the Republican Elephant, and Uncle Sam in the 1800s. There are a dozen cartoonists featured at this collection of caricatures and political cartoons from the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, and allows you to search by theme."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Step by step instructions on drawing in one-point perspective are clearly described and illustrated with animated examples. You’ll start by clicking on the vanishing point and then through a series of images and explanations about how horizon lines, orthogonals, and vertical lines work to give the proper perspective in a drawing. A short section on drawing tools demonstrates how to use a triangle and T-Square. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Eliot Porter was a nature photographer working in color when color film was new. The site is geared to middle school students, but students of all ages can enjoy the images and learn from Porter’s appreciation of nature and compositions using framing, angle of view, and light quality. Student activities include sections titled: Becoming an Artist, The World of Eliot Porter, and Making a Statement and a printable activity log with questions related to the three sections. Photography assignments focus on colors in nature and neighborhood environments. The 10 page activity log and photography assignments are available in html and pdf formats. Rollovers (mouseovers) define terms and provide bibliographic citations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"An online exhibit of Native American baskets from the University of Washington's Burke Museum, ""Entwined with Life"" illustrates how baskets were used not only to carry and store materials, but also as garments, cooking, ceremonies, cradles, and as children's toys. The majority of the baskets are from Northwest Coast nations from the Arctic to California. The Study Lab section has features on Haida hats, archaeological artifacts, and examples from over 25 nations. A K-12 Teacher's Guide is available in the Resources section. Don't miss the fun Basket ID game where you try to figure out how the basket was made(plaited, twined, or coiled), design technique and pattern, and use. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This site serves as a supplement to the series Essentials of Music, published by W.W. Norton, but you don't need to own the book and record set to gain a basic education in classical music. There is a glossary of musical terms, biographies of composers, audio clips of numerous pieces, and descriptions of the six major eras of musical history: Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Twentieth Century. RealAudio is required for sound clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Explore this site through the features, artifact showcase, and interviews to find out about blues, rock ‘n’ roll, folk, and hip hop. Famous musicians to read about and listen to include Dylan, Hendrix, and Bragg. There are 20 interviews in the archives. Topics found in the CREATE section include home recording essentials, elements of a song, and the business of songwriters, touring with a band, and a behind the scenes look at staging a big concert. There is an extensive glossary. Portions of the site require Windows Media for audio and video. To find the lesson plans, go to the section labeled VISIT, and you’ll find the curriculum for students in grades 3-6 and 7-12. Some of these lessons relate to actual visits to this museum, but that can be adapted to other resources in your local area or online. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Paper engineer Robert Sabuda has created many pop-up books and shares his art with us on his site. There are templates and instructions on how you can make your own simple pop-up cards. View the international gallery to see pop-up books and displays from over a dozen different countries. Read details on how a pop-up book is created from start to finish in the questions about design in the FAQs at http://robertsabuda.com/faq.asp#design

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Fats Waller was a jazz pianist from Harlem, famous for songs like “Ain’t Misbehavin’” and “Honeysuckle Rose”. This site from the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University serves as an introduction to the life and music of a pioneer musician. The site’s layout is horizontal, so you’ll need to scroll left to right to see the many photos. Short audio clips accompany the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This online tutorial has a primer on drawing materials, figure drawing, and gesture drawing. Other major sections are proportion, shading and texture, and construction. While this site is aimed at college level art students, high school students will learn from the suggestions provided. The maturity level of students should be considered since there are many nude drawings of male and female figures."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"What's not to like about 70,000 digital images of famous artwork available free on this Web site? What's more, the images are available at various sizes and resolutions, searchable by keyword, artist, country, or period, and browseable by medium/genre. Teachers guides are also included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The Children's Museum of Indianapolis brings you the world of sculpture by introducing what sculptors do and what they create with. Most images of sculptures on the site can be clicked on for further information. There are also Make it at Home ideas to experiment with. Try making your own sculpture!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Meet a man who makes windmill-powered whirligigs, some over 30 feet tall! The whirligigs are amazing, with great detail and grand scale. To get an idea of the size of the pieces, zoom in on the detail pictures. In one, you’ll see soda cans used as components. When you zoom out, you’ll get a better sense of the scale of the whirligig. There are activities for students to make their own whirligigs. RealVideo Player and QuickTime are required for different video clips. The site is graphic-rich, so be prepared for long download times on slower connections."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Students of photography shouldn’t miss this online exhibit of photography from 1839 to the present. Collections are arranged by photographer, photographic equipment and related technologies. The collection of pre-cinema technology houses images from lantern slides, slip slides, stereo images, polyorama panoptique, zoopraxiscopes, and other uncommon images. The glossary is useful for explaining terms from technologies of long ago."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Go to the Getty Museum's online games to become familiar with their art collection. The Detail Detective presents you with four similar images from paintings and you need to figure out which one is from the whole painting on the screen. Match Madness is a game of concentration where you turn over two cards at a time looking for a match. Switch tests you on finding slight differences in paintings. The Jigsaw Puzzles let you choose how many pieces you want to start with, from 16 to 81 as you drag the pieces together. Each of these games offer a hard and not-as-hard version. Downloads include a bookmark, a mask, or an activity to create a Monet-like wheatstack display to experiment how the images changes depending upon the light, much like Monet did in his paintings. Flash is required for all games.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"From glamour shots of models to photos of beggar women, Gordon Parks captured beauty, death, poverty, and everyday life. He described his camera as a “weapon against poverty and racism.” In addition to photography, Parks was a painter, poet, musician, composer, and film director. View the gallery of photos with commentary in text and audio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Western History / Genealogy Department of the Denver Public Library houses a major collection of photography documenting the development of the American West. Some of the GoWest Classics are photos of saloons, wagon trails, Wild West shows, and famous Native Americans. Other images in the Western Theme collection include cowboys, cowgirls, and gold miners. Of special interest are photographer biographies such as David Barry who was photographing people and places in the Dakota Territory during the late 1870s. You can search the database of photos by keyword or photographer. Use the Help page for searching guidance and a list of suggested keywords."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"We have all heard of Superman, Spiderman, and Batman, but have you heard of these distinctive Canadian superheroes: Johnny Canuck, Canada Jack, and the Northern Light? These superheroes have been promoting Canadian heroism and patriotism since the early 1900s, but became most prominent during World War II, when Canadian national superheroes were smashing the Axis powers. You’ll find superhero profiles and creator biographies. Get those pens and pencils out and start drawing!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Guggenheim Museum site is a collection of art from the different Guggenheim Museums in New York City, Bilbao, and Venice. You can view the artworks by artist, title of work, date, movement, medium, or concept. Media represented are not only painting and sculpture, but also photography, film, and non-painting works on paper. Many definitions are provided for art-historical terms such as kitsch and avant-garde. Over 100 artists are represented, some as familiar as Georges Seurat and Alexander Calder, but many names will be new to you. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"H.C. Westermann was an American sculptor and printmaker, mostly famous for his wood sculpture and marquetry (inlaid wood). He served in both World War II and The Korean War and war became a common theme in his work. The curriculum guide is for middle and high school teachers exploring Westermann’s art through the themes of travel and transportation, craftsmanship and process, war, social and political commentary, technology and science fiction, and humor. The timeline notes events in Westermann’s life along with world events."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This online studio allows children to learn about pottery, weaving, quilting, and basketry techniques and traditions. Visit Studio 1, the Pottery Studio, to throw a pot, pinch a pot, meet some kids who work with clay, and visit the Clay Lab for some funny facts and sounds. Studio 2 takes you to the basketry, weaving, and quilting studios. Click and drag quilt pieces to ""sew"" your own quilt online. Play the basket concentration game and learn more about basket weaving. QuickTime, Shockwave and Flash are required for some activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Graffiti artist Keith Haring had a distinctive, bold style you’ll probably recognize as you see his work at this site. Kids will have fun playing with the morphs, stories, interactive coloring book, e-cards, and hangman. Several of Keith’s books are on the site, including “Ten” which has bold numbers and the word in English, Spanish, French, and German with a link to nine other languages. Over 80 lesson plans, grouped from early childhood through high school with a focus on elementary grades on the topics of art, art criticism, community service, dance and music, and other curriculum topics. A short biography of Haring is also found on the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"African Americans have played a significant role in American music, from black spirituals to blues, jazz, rock and roll, and classical music. This site from World Book Encyclopedia provides short articles, photographs, biographies, and audio clips. Featured musicians include Wynton Marsalis, Gladys Knight, Chubby Checker, Lena Horne, and Paul Robeson. The Rock and Roll section includes rap, soul, and the rock of Chuck Berry. The audio clips require Real Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Hirshhorn is the Smithsonian's museum of international modern and contemporary art. Many online exhibits display past exhibitions, and there are some exhibits that are interactive, such as Visual Music, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Cai Guo-Qiang. In line with modern art, the Hirshhorn is also modern by supplying podcasts of conversations with artists and curators. The Education area has sample pages of teacher resources from the “Story of Modern Art” and “Animals in Art” in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The National Gallery of Art has a site about American design with selected online tours featuring dolls, fashion, folk arts of the Spanish Southwest, furniture, Pennsylvania German Folk Art, pottery, Shaker crafts, textiles, toys, and woodcarvings. This collection is a compilation of thousands of watercolor renderings that depict traditional American arts and crafts made before about 1890. The renderings were a project funded by the WPA in the 1930s to create a comprehensive visual resource of traditional American design. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Three digital exhibits from The Institute of Jazz Studies Rutgers University Libraries honor the contributions of Fats Waller, Mary Lou Williams, and Benny Carter. Music clips using RealAudio accompany each musician’s exhibit. Biographical information, photographs, tours, and further resources make this site a rich site for students interested in jazz music. Fats Waller is known for being a gifted pianist and composer, Mary Lou Williams has been called the greatest female jazz musician, and Benny Carter’s influence spans eight decades from the 1920s to the 1990s. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln houses an online collection of quilts from their International Quilt Study Center. Search or browse by looking for a primary pattern, date, or region/state of creation. The advanced search has a pull down menu of over 100 primary patterns to choose from. There is a Quilt of the Month feature, a quilt history timeline, a virtual exhibit titled Patchwork Lives, and gallery guide booklets about Log Cabin Quilts and Amish Quilts that can be downloaded in PDF. The FAQ section has information about general questions and quilt and textile care. One question of particular interest to educators is one which dispels the myth about the Underground Railroad “quilt code”. Check the Online Resources for video and podcasts of presentations at the Center. The site is also available in French and Japanese.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"What gives musicians, writers, filmmakers or performers their source of inspiration? National Public Radio has an archive of interviews with people like Alice Walker who was inspired by Zora Neale Hurston and Sandra Cisneros who loved fairy tales as a child and weaves them into her own writing. Ve Neill is Hollywood makeup artist who loved monster movies as a child and turned that passion into an art, creating the makeup for hits such as Pirates of the Caribbean, Mrs. Doubtfire, and Edward Scissorhands. Other interviews include composer Stephen Schwartz, comic book artist Mike Mignola, and playwright August Wilson. What inspires you? Using Real Player or Windows Media 9 Player, you can listen to the original broadcast. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

This site showcases research performed by Harvard scholars on three Dutch paintings. The site offers an interactive program that demonstrates the ways in which computer technology can be harnessed to add to our knowledge about Renaissance paintings and how they were made.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Biographies of the conductor and players from Jazz at Lincoln Center introduce you to many talented musicians. The Jazz Notes are articles written by Stanley Crouch about different aspects and personalities of jazz including Thelonious Monk and Sidney Bechet. The Web site promises online lessons related to Louis Armstrong, improvisation, and Latin jazz. Linked from this site is the radio program Jazz from Lincoln Center http://www.jazzradio.org/realarch1.htm where you can read the transcripts and listen to over 20 radio shows using RealAudio. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz offers “Jazz in America” a curriculum guide for grades 5, 8, and 11 with a course syllabus, and related to U.S. History and Arts Education Standards. The Jazz Resource Library has a timeline, glossary, images, and style sheets. Style sheets cover Boogie Woogie, Dixieland Jazz, Bebop, Swing, Ragtime, and other styles. Audio clips require Real Audio Player. The student handouts, lesson plans, and test banks are downloadable in PDF. The answer keys are available to educators who have registered (free) with the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

This site boasts over 130 art lessons (and growing) that teachers and parents can use in their home or school classroom. Users can add their own lesson ideas to the site as well.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Labor Arts provides images of past and present working people. You can browse by type of art: buttons, photographs, song books, murals, leaflets, and cartoons or by time periods. Themes presented are civil rights, strikes, workers at work, Union Square, and demonstrations. The Little Tradeswoman Coloring Book was published in the 1980s with women depicted in non-traditional careers of fire fighter, plumber, and telephone line worker. Posters by artists Jacob Lawrence and Milton Glaser are highlighted in the Images of Labor section. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Explore the making of art by prisoners of war in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, many created in secret, others with knowledge of the Nazi officials. There is biographical information on the artists who worked there, interviews with survivors, and essays on other forms of art in the concentration camps, particularly musical and theatrical endeavors. The section on Auschwitz includes information on the place, tours, and a glossary. The virtual tours require QuickTime. Some essays are in pdf format. Many images are disturbing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Join Carmine Chameleon for an ArtEdventure into the mystery of a missing painting. You'll find information about the Renaissance and Leonardo da Vinci as you track down the stolen painting. As you find clues in Leonardo's room that lead you to information about his inventions, paintings, and interesting tools he used like a perspectograph. The toolbar at the bottom of each page takes you out of the Leonardo section but is filled with art activities and ideas, well worth investigating."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Perhaps nothing like a letter or diary invites us into a person’s mind, as these letters from Vincent to his brother Theo. Vincent led a tortured life, often depressed, usually in debt, yet created works of beauty in spite of his torment. Browse through the letters by theme such as love, depression, or family, or also by keyword. Excerpts and full text are provided. The complete letters also have images of the relevant paintings mentioned in the letter. A timeline also notes when each letter is written, and you can browse letters chronologically. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The University of Virginia Library has compiled ballads, hymns and spirituals, patriotic odes, minstrels and musicals, protest songs, and songs about Virginia that reflect music in American life. The site includes audio clips of many songs, images of sheet music, notes from songwriters, and historic background. Highlighted singers include Lead Belly, Bob Dylan, and the Almanac Singers. Hear clips of ""We Shall Overcome"", ""Carry Me Back to Old Virginny,"" and ""Over There"". QuickTime or MP3 is required to hear audio clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Let a Chinese handscroll, Nepalese mandala, and other pieces in this museum take you on a journey to different places. Each of the eight featured works of art is a form of map, sometimes to depict actual landscape and sometimes to provide a path to a spiritual world. Viewers are encouraged to think about what the artist has chosen to display, what not to include, and for what purpose. Interactive rollovers (mouseovers) identify interesting details in each piece. Teacher guides for three of the pieces are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Louisiana has a rich tradition of crafts, music, language, and food. Some of the cultures represented include Native American, French Creole, Cajun, Spanish, European, and Asian. Online exhibits of artifacts are grouped according to Folk Toys, Ritual, Festival & Religion, Domestic Crafts, Decorative Folk Arts, Occupational Crafts, and Folk Instruments. An extensive teacher’s guide is geared to 4th to 8th grade, but can be adapted for all grades. Some resources are available in French. Try the Folklife Bingo game or the online Scavenger Hunt. A glossary is found in the teacher guide. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Freer and Sackler Galleries present an online exhibition of Hokusai’s art. You probably have seen his most famous prints, “The Wave” or views of Mt. Fuji. The sections of the site address Hokusai’s use of composition, color, and subject. Both painting and woodblocks are displayed in single works of art, but also a sketch book and a long interactive scroll. Mouse over the images for close-up views. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Artist Flo Wong created a rice-sack flag exhibit that explores the identity secrets of Chinese immigrants detained and interrogated in the United States. 25 rice sack flags represent the interviews she had with Chinese detainees who had to lie to circumvent the Chinese Exclusion Act, an 1882 federal law aimed at limiting the numbers of Chinese coming to the U.S. Many immigrants had to lie about their identities in order to be reunited with their families. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Created by the Tech Museum of Innovation and Adobe Systems Incorporated, this online exhibit introduces students to the many different aspects of color. Make a Splash with Color explores the 'ingredients' that make up color, the different sources of light that create colors and how our brains interpret color. Students can follow along through each section and interactively try out many of the theories presented."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"You don’t have to like modern art to make sense of it, but the more you understand, maybe the better you will appreciate it. This site from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art uses QuickTime and Flash to allow you to see details of individual artworks, explore excerpts from archival videos and films, and listen to commentary by artists, art historians, and critics. The themes are style, tracing identity, and art and social change. Artists represented include Andy Warhol, Judy Chicago, Rene Magritte, and Salvadore Dali. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"As you enter this site, you hear the orchestra tune for the concert. Watch a video clip of the conductor talking about his role, learn about different periods of music history, see where the different players sit and learn about their instruments. The descriptions include audio clips, construction and a history of the instrument. You will need Shockwave and Quicktime to get the full benefit of this site. Don't forget to check out the Music Analyzer and The Virtual Composer."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"January 2006 marks the 250th anniversary of Mozart’s birth. Using the navigation item titled “Life and Works” and “In Mozart’s Footsteps” you’ll find a short biography, a video clip, and a tour of Mozart homes and other important places in Salzburg, Vienna, and other towns in Austria. Text is also available in German, Spanish, Japanese, French, Italian, and French."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Can’t remember who played the principal of the high school on “Room 222”? This site will give you the answer you need. You’ll find summaries, photos, cast lists, programming history, and other important facts about hundreds of television shows. Actor listings give short biographies and details about television series and other media. Perfect for the trivia lover, the writer getting facts straight, or when you can’t sleep at night until you remember “Who was the female character Flip Wilson played?” or “What time was “The Waltons” on?” (Answers: Michael Constantine, Geraldine, and Thursdays at 8:00). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Museum of Costume in Bath, England has some fun activities where you try to dress someone in the proper style for a given era. The clothing fashions for men, women, and children range from the late 1500s to modern times. Click on the highlights for the three display galleries covering the periods: Dress before 1800; Dress 1800 - 1899; and Dress since 1900. For modern clothing, go to the collection area, and see Dress of the Year. Can you see your mother or grandmother in some of these lovely fashions?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Graduate students at the University of Michigan have created this useful musical instrument encyclopedia for those who can't remember what exactly a mbira is or from what country it came. You'll find easy to understand definitions detailing what the instrument is, where it originated and how it is used. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This 1998 ThinkQuest submission still has potentially valuable information for students interested in the history of music and individual instruments, music theory, different musical styles. There are also a few interactive games, midi files, and a threaded discussion board."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Created by a high school student, now in college, this site about music theory is a terrific introductory and advanced theory overview on over 34 topics from clef signs and note duration to triads in second inversion. Each lesson has a short description, vocabulary used, and flash animation with sound to demonstrate the concept. Some printable charts are provided. The Trainer components are interactive practice sessions where you can set specific criteria to practice. The Utilities allow you to create and print your own staff paper, a matrix generator for 20th century music, and a chord calculator. Flash is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Musicals101 is billed as “The Cyber Encyclopedia of Musical Theatre, TV and Film” and the educator/theatrical professional who created the site has compiled an extensive collection about musicals. There are numerous introductory features about people like Noel Coward, George M. Cohan, Al Jolson, and Ethel Merman. Some of the reference sources especially helpful to school productions are the performance rights index, how to find recordings and scripts, and how to put on a musical. There are brief entries about over a hundred Broadway theatres from the early 1900s to today. For musical theatre lovers, this is a great site to roam about. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Online versions of past and current exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art house an excellent collection of painting, currency, masks and figurative sculpture, ceramics, everyday household objects, hats, photographs, furniture, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Playtime! provides a collection of activities and resources in African art, geography, music, social studies, and language. Students can draw a mask from the museum’s collection or design one of their own. They can print and draw designs on a cape or blanket or decorate a pot. They can design Kente cloth. Requires Shockwave, Adobe Acrobat Reader, and QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Using the Education section, find lesson plans and curriculum ideas for wildlife art for middle and high school students. Art Tales encourages students to tell stories by choosing a role of a frontier explorer, field guide writer, or museum curator. The Collection section allows you to search over 2000 images by artist, species, genre, medium, season of the year, and century. Featured artworks are exhibited on a monthly basis."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The National Museum of Women in the Arts houses pieces from women artists of periods and nationalities that range from the Renaissance to modern artists. Artist profiles of over 20 women are found, including Mary Cassatt, Frida Kahlo, and Jaune Quick-To-See Smith. You can tour the permanent collection with introductions to the time period and images from the galleries. With Windows Media Player, you can listen to the audio version of the tour with the museum’s founder. The text on the site and the audio tour narration are different so be sure to access both versions if possible. Bibliographies for each artist are provided for further reference."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The New Britain Museum of American Art features art from the colonial era to modern times. The timeline navigation allows you to learn more about a specific painting, a period of art or you can focus on a specific artist. Some paintings have associated essays. Artists include Maxfield Parrish, George Inness, and John Singer Sargent. In the Exhibitions section, check the Web Shows for features on Thomas Hart Benton, the ABCs of the collection (A is for Armor), and an interesting feature on clothing styles in the paintings. This section includes images as well as a glossary defining terms such as a leg-o-mutton sleeve, stomacher, and a bustle."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"New Orleans is considered to be the birthplace of jazz. The National Park Service offers some New Orleans jazz history where you can find out about famous jazz neighborhoods, musicians, and maps. There are multiple audio clips from each era: The Early Years: 1925-1936, The Revival: 1940-1960, and the 21st century. You need to be able to play MP3 audio files, QuickTime or Windows Media Player will work. A lengthy biography accompanies the history section. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Meet the musicians in the Lounge, scores of composers in the Gallery, and conductors and soloists in the Dressing Room. The Instrument Room houses the typical philharmonic instruments by family: strings, woodwinds, percussion, and brass. Many instruments also have friends and relatives in other cultures which are highlighted too. Try making your own instruments like the strawmbone or the French hose in the Instrument Lab. Games include a scavenger hunt, matching composers and instruments, quizzes and puzzles. Shockwave and Flash are required for some sections of the site. Audio and video clips require QuickTime and RealPlayer"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences provides midi files and lyrics that allow students and teachers to sing along with their favorite songs. Music categories include children's songs, patriotic, favorites, movies/musicals, and holidays/sounds. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Meet six musicians from North Carolina, two blues guitarists, a Lumbee drummer and flute player, gospel singers, and an old time banjo picker. Each musician is introduced with a short Flash slideshow and samples of their music. This site makes extensive use of audio and uses Flash technology."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Many notable American artists, authors, and musicians were Unitarians and there are biographical sketches found at this site. Personalities include singers Pete Seeger and Malvina Reynolds, poets e.e. cummings, May Sarton, and Conrad Aiken, and composers Bela Bartok and Mary Carr Moore. Students may not be as familiar with names such as journalist for social justice Ben Bagdikian whose profile discusses his writing about prisoners, civil rights and poverty in the south. Most profiles have photographs, selections of writings, and recommended readings. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This National Public Radio site lists the 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century. The site is eclectic, including jazz, pop, rock and roll, musicals, and ""serious music."" All the selections include brief descriptions, extended audio discussions, and excerpts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Odyssey Online is a journey through several museums to explore the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and 19th-20th century sub-Saharan Africa. Definitions and pronunciations to bold words are provided and you can click each highlighted image for more information about the object. Listen to stories, and find puzzles, games, and worksheets. The Teacher Resource Site helps teachers by providing ideas how to teach with museum objects. The site is aimed at elementary and middle school students. Adobe Acrobat, Shockwave, and QuickTime are required to view the complete site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Visit the online exhibit from the Brooklyn Museum of the ukiyo-e printmaker artist Utagawa Hiroshige’s (1797–1858) 118 views of Edo (modern Tokyo). These woodblock prints are of temples, shrines, and gardens depicted during the four seasons. View the collection by season or browse by keyword (animals, snow, Mt. Fuji, trees, city life). Additional information about the wood block print making process and how to read a woodblock print (artist signature, publisher seal, series and print titles) help explain the works of art.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Texas A&M University brings you the life and works of Pablo Picasso in sixteen periods, covering the years 1881-1973. Click on a year and read what happened and what he did. Then click a margin photo and see where Picasso lived and worked or click a thumbnail painting to view an enlargement. The site links to museums around the world, some with photos of his work on exhibit."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This introduction to visual literacy presents the basic visual elements: dot, line, shape, direction, texture, hue, saturation, value, dimension, motion, and scale. Artworks, movie stills, and animations provide examples of the elements, so when you learn about saturation, for example, you have several models to represent the concept. Video clips require QuickTime and audio clips require Real Audio. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"If you enjoy origami or have ever wondered about how to create those amazing paper constructions, this is the site for you. Start in the Learning Center to learn how to make the different folds and then make basic pieces. It is worth the time to understand how to read the symbols on the diagrams because you will be able to apply that knowledge to almost any other book or guide you find at the library. If you are already an experienced paper folder, try some of the traditional and original creations by the authors of the site in the Studio. There are people, animals, boxes, plants, and decorations with written and pictorial instructions. Some of the site is commercial but you don’t need to buy the books to create interesting pieces."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"More than 20 patriotic songs from the United States are represented at the Library of Congress site that is part of the I Hear America Singing collection. In addition to audio versions of the songs, many selections also include sheet music, short historical profiles, photographs and illustrations, resources for further reading, and bibliographies. Items from this special collection include Irving Berlin’s handwritten lyrics to “God Bless America” and Francis Scott Key’s “Star Spangled Banner.” There is background information discussing the legend about the national anthem and the relationship with a drinking song. Audio clips are available in RealAudio and MP3 format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"STOMP is not quite a dance, not quite a play. It is an investigation into rhythm and character. The Percussion for Kids section of the STOMP site introduces younger students and older students to percussion. Lessons and activities reinforce the concepts of vibration, volume, pitch, frequency, and amplification. The Rainforest section has activities for making a rainstick."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Visit the Library of CongressÂ’s Performing Arts Encyclopedia for a tour of the music, theater, and dance collections on their site. Resources include digitized scores, sheet music, audio recordings, films, articles, and photographs. Searches can be narrowed by resource type, keyword, title, performer, and subject. Online presentations include Sousa marches, Civil War sheet music, African American band music, and ragtime.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Who else but Peter Schickele, aka P.D.Q. Bach, would write pieces titled ""Music for an Awful Lot of Winds and Percussion"" and ""The Short-Tempered Clavier and Other Dysfunctional Works for Keyboard""? If you haven't heard any of his music, see if your librarian can get you some recordings to borrow. You can read some of his funny lyrics at this site. Listen to clips of the Tyrannosaurus Rex song or the Schleptet, hear a radio interview with Schickele and a spot on Prairie Home Companion using RealPlayer. There are a few other audio clips scattered throughout the site to whet your appetite. To hear his weekly radio program, there are pointers to radio station Web sites where you can listen to the show but unfortunately, they aren't available on this site for copyright reasons. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History highlights 25 pianos for an overview of pianos and their influence on American culture. The Timeline begins with the creation of the piano e forte in 1700. Audio clips of famous pianists from Elton John to Jelly Roll Morton demonstrate their signature styles. You can browse by genre: classical, rock, jazz, popular, gospel and ragtime. Listen to the difference between a hammer dulcimer and a grand piano. MP3, WAV or RealAudio are required for audio clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Posters have long played a role in social protest movements. Images and icons can relate messages even without using words. This collection is from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Pay particular attention to the Advice to Americans and Patriotic Persuasion sections. You’ll find posters protesting the Viet Nam War, boycotting grapes to support farm workers, and supporting the Black Panther movement, among other causes. The process of poster making is presented and the essay titled “The Posters” describes how posters are used to communicate and invite action."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Ohio State University posted an online exhibit which looks at political posters from the Cultural Revolution (1965-1979) as social and historical documents. Posters are a means of spreading political messages to a mass audience, especially among a nation of many languages. Click on thumbnails for a full screen image, translations, and some with annotations explaining what is symbolized in the poster. If you see a pop-up saying you need to install the Traditional Chinese Language pack, just click cancel and you’ll still see the English text. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"These puzzles incorporate images from 20 works in the collections of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Each image depicts an animal and includes a description of the artwork, who made the creature, the materials used, where it is from, and when it was created. Intriguing questions and activities are found throughout the site, including using a timeline with images of other works to deduce similar styles and time periods. A bibliography is included. QuickTime is required for the 360 degree video clips of some objects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"""Reader's Theater Editions"" is a series of scripts adapted from stories by Aaron Shepard and others which are mostly humor, fantasy, and retold tales from a variety of cultures. Most scripts are for students from grades 3 to 9. Each script notes genre, culture of origin or setting, theme, suggested reading grade level, number of readers, and approximate reading time. Suggestions for adaptations are also included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Redstudio is a collaboration between the Museum of Modern Art and high school students, and explores issues and questions from teens about modern art, today's working artists, and what goes on behind the scenes at a museum. Features include teen interviews with artists and activities like create photograms, create a dadaist poem, remix an interactive collage, or design your own school. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Rembrandt was born in 1606, and this site highlights his life, paintings, themes, and what was happening during the time in his life and world events. His painting style is a light-dark effect called clair-obscure. In addition to painting, Rembrandt did hundreds of etchings and engravings. Navigating the site is a little awkward, so click on the tab labeled “Rembrandt” to find the sections about his life and times. Click on the tab “Rembrandts work” to find eight of his works including “The Night Watch” and “The Anatomy Lesson”. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This site is the product of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which houses the largest collection of art and history in the Netherlands. The core of the museum's collection are the paintings of the seventeenth-century Dutch Republic, the Golden Age, including works by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Frans Hals, and Jan Steen. Take the virtual tour room by room or click on a favorite painting. Each painting can be enlarged. Click and drag your cursor and explore every inch."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Not all inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame are hard core rock and roll, ranging from Pete Seeger to Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Mahalia Jackson. There are biographical sketches of the inductees including non-Performers, “sidemen” and early influencers who are given also their due. Special exhibits include brief notes about clothing, instruments, and other memorabilia. Using the timeline, you can browse by era, artist, genre, or events. The Visual Timeline requires the Shockwave Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This site provides resources for over 100 songwriters, stage musicals, and over 3000 songs. The Theater Library provides pages for each show with a plot description, history, discography, and production information in case you are planning your own production. You'll also find biographies and a Puzzlement (a quiz). Most musicals include audio clips. Don't miss classics like Ethel Merman belting out ""Anything you can do, I can do better"" from Annie Get Your Gun. RealPlayer is required for audio clips. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Melting clocks, surreal landscapes, eccentric mustache...it must be Salvador Dali. The Dali Museum in Florida is the world's most comprehensive collection of the renowned Spanish artist's work. Examples of Dali’s early years, transitional period, surreal period, and classic period are presented as well as a short biography. There is a teacher’s guide to the museum and two activities for children - a word find and a coloring page of detail of Dalí's softwatch from “The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory”. The Surrealist Game, the Exquisite Corpse, demonstrates collaboration among a team of artists. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Watch the creation of a sand mandala made in the Indian Temple at the Philadelphia Museum of Art by the Venerable Losang Samten. This Wheel of Life sand painting depicts the Tibetan cyclical nature of life. The painting construction link has a timeline to view the creation over five days. Use your mouse in the Wheel of Life Explained to learn what each section of the mandala means.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The New York Public Library has an online exhibit of some of their best collections of prints of medical and scientific subjects. The illustration processes discuss color, relief printing (woodcut and wood engraving), intaglio printing (engraving, etching), planographic printing (lithography), and photography. The site reminds the reader that until the middle of the nineteenth century and the development of chromolithography, color was not common in books. Illustrations from books printed centuries ago accompany descriptions of each printing style. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Gallery's collection of American art includes 154 works by African American artists including Willie Cole, Sam Gilliam, Jacob Lawrence, Edward L. Loper, Horace Pippin, Alma Thomas, and Charles Wilbert White. Paintings can be enlarged for better viewing and some also have detail images. There are bibliographies, narratives, and exhibition histories related to each painting."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Initially intended for a museum or gallery for traveling exhibits, this site displays almost 30 movie posters of African-American actors and directors that can be a rich resource for film and culture classes. Clicking on any of the featured posters gives a synopsis of the film and sometimes information about the film’s impact. One example is Disney’s “Song of the South” which depicted slavery as being pleasant or not existing. Movies date as far back as 1918 with a movie about black soldiers in World War I. Many from the collection are about musicians like Thelonious Monk and Billie Holiday or historical events, such as the Tuskegee Airmen and Glory (civil war). The style of art over the decades is representative of each era. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Australia, Canada, and Britain were allies during the Second World War fighting a common enemy. The Australian War Memorial, Canadian War Museum, Imperial War Museum collaborated to create a shared exhibit. Themes on this site include battle, home, work, leisure, service, casualties, and captivity. An introductory essay and short biographies of artists and their selected paintings are included. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The Greensboro Woolworth sit-ins were a landmark in the American Civil Rights Movement. Four black students sat at the luncheon counter to eat and were refused service. The original counter and seats have been moved to the Smithsonian Institution of American History. PDF format.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"SmARTKids is presented by the Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago especially for upper elementary and middle schoolers to learn about ways to look at, think about, and respond creatively to art. Be an art detective and learn to investigate paintings, sculpture, ceramics, and photography. This is an interactive game where you find clues and can “ask the curator” to help you decide which label should go with a piece of art. The ""Look & Share"" and ""Artist Studio"" sections include some virtual demonstrations of art processes such as oil painting, ceramics and photography. Art Speak is an illustrated glossary with guided questions to help children think about what they are viewing. Requires Flash. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Take the A Train and let Duke, Louis, Ella, and Benny bring you jazz music, quizzes, and games from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. There are lesson plans tied to national standards for arts education. Find out what happened today in jazz history or go to Jazz 365 to find any date of the year. You can even hear Duke Ellington describe what he thinks jazz is. Real Audio, Real Media, QuickTime and Flash are required for parts of the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Over 300 songwriters from as long ago as 1600 to today, from Early American music through Tin Pan Alley and Rock and Roll, are honored at this Hall of Fame. YouÂ’ll see well known names like Stephen Foster, Scott Joplin, Dolly Parton and Elton John, among many less famous songwriters also deserving of this honor. Songwriter profiles have a short biography, photos, audio clips, timeline, and discography. Using the Jukebox, listen to selections from the audio clip library in MP3 or WindowsMedia format.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

Stagework takes you behind the scenes of the National Theatre in England to bring stage craft to the public, including teachers and students. One of the featured works is Philip Pullman’s “His Dark Materials” which explores costume design, lighting, plot development, and characterization. Other plays at the site include Richard III, Henry V, and The Crucible, which delve into the themes of war, faith, fundamentalism, and corruption. View numerous video clips of interviews, scenes from rehearsals, and a cool way to observe a scene from Richard III from four different points of view. Learn about different roles of technical, creative, and administrative staff who work in the theatre to create a production. Lesson plans and guidance notes are provided for teachers. Requires Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Basquiat was an artist for much of his short life. He created paintings and drawings about justice and equality, heroes, visual poetry, and cultural identity of his African-Caribbean heritage. You can explore these themes in the site and create your own online artwork. Because Basquiat was interested in jazz and hip-hop, the site is supplemented with music from Charlie Parker, reinforcing the improvisation brought to the paintings. The site is offered in English and in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Art Institute of Chicago presents an online exhibit of over 100 works of Taoist art illustrating many facets of the Taoist religion. The exhibition includes paintings, calligraphy, sculpture, porcelain, lacquer, and ritual robes and implements. The sections on diagrams include the Chinese zodiac, Chinese scrolls, taiji (yin and yang symbol), and trigrams. Additional features are a glossary, map, and timeline from 1600 B.C.– A.D. 1911. Teachers will find lesson plans for elementary to high school. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"According to this account, Taps was originally a “lights out” bugle call but was used at a military funeral in 1862 where it was deemed unwise to shoot the usual three volleys over the grave, for fear of revealing the Union location to the enemy. Links to other history of Taps sites are provided as well as the traditionally sung lyrics and recordings in MIDI, MP3, Real Audio, and WAV formats."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The Textile Museum in Washington, DC houses over 18,000 textiles, and you can view some of the prized items in the Textile of the Month. Kimonos, tapestries, rugs, molas, and other non-Western textiles are represented. There are pamphlets with guidelines for the care and display of textiles, storing Oriental carpets, a hanging system for textiles in sturdy condition, and pest busters (moths, beetles, silverfish, mold, and mildew).

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"You may have a handheld electronic game on long car trips, but your parents probably had magic slates and slide puzzles. Be sure to sit down with an adult for this site because they are going to shout, point, and say “I had one of those!” The site is full of 1950s-1980s kid memorabilia, cereal boxes, food packaging, fast foods, premiums, and cartoon characters used in advertising. This would be a great conversation starter for an interview with an older person about their childhood. After your parent’s or teacher’s trip down memory lane, take another look at the styles, stereotypes, and evolution of the art over the decades for a single product. Consider which types of premiums wouldn’t be offered anymore (ashtrays?!) and what is typically found as prizes today. Images in advertising has come a long way, baby. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Timeline of Art History provides an overview of the history of art as illustrated and represented in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection. This site can be navigated chronologically or geographically. The date range begins approximately 15,000 BC and will continue through modern time. Key historical events are included on the timeline and specific objects from the Museum are highlighted. A locator map and links to additional information are provided."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Thanks to musicologists like Alan Lomax, we have a vast collection of labor union songs that are presented at this site. Most are from the union days in the first half of the 1900s, often about miners. Some are new because labor unions are still fighting for various worker causes such as chemical poisoning in the workplace. Almost 150 songs are collected here, with lyrics and notes about the song or the author. There are articles related to union songs, and a large discography and bibliography for further research. In addition to a large number of songs from the United States, you’ll find a many from Australia, Canada, England, and New Zealand. The audio clips are in QuickTime MIDI files."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Web Gallery of Art contains over 6,000 digital reproductions of European paintings and sculptures created between the years 1150 and 1750. Many of the pictures are discussed and biographies of the significant artists are given. A site search engine allows you to find pictures in the collection using various search criteria. Seven guided tours are presented, including the Sistine Chapel, Art of Spain, and Overview of Italian Painters from 1200 to 1750."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Museum of Modern Art in New York shows how prints are made from woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and screenprints. Each style includes a short description, a gallery of artworks, and an interactive demonstration of how to create the prints. Try your hand at carving a woodblock, inking a screen, and operating the printing press. This site is great fun to work with! Maybe you'll want to try your hand at real printmaking. Requires Flash, or choose the non-Flash version."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"A Winslow Homer exhibit from the National Gallery of Art has examples of Homer’s oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and wood engravings. Images range from Civil War soldiers to hunting and fishing to daily chores. The light and color are magnificent. A “zoomable” slide show of 35 images requires Flash and you need to turn off your pop-up blocker. A short narrated video clip describes Homer’s early career."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"This site from the American Memory collection highlights letters between Woody Guthrie and staff, particularly Alan Lomax, of the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress from the years 1940-1950. There is a biographical essay, timeline, and images of items held in the collection. Woody Guthrie grew up during hard times of poverty, family tragedy, the Depression and the Dust Bowl; yet he left behind hundreds of songs most Americans know from elementary school, including ""This Land Is Your Land."" See the letter in this collection written on March 14, 1946 for a flavor of Woody’s humor."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"Explore the world of art with the Getty Education Institute for the Arts and the Los Angeles Culture Net. K-12 teachers will discover an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to making use of the Internet to help bring Los Angeles's worlds of art into the classroom. Teachers outside of Los Angeles can also use the lesson plans and resources to build connections between art learning and the art worlds of their own communities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the people who bring us the Oscars, have created teaching guides related to making movies including film editing, cinematography, screenwriting, art direction, animation, documentaries, visual effects, and sound and music. The activities are designed for secondary students. Download the PDF activities guides, which include introductory material, suggestions for selected films for student viewing and important vocabulary related to the various topics.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts

"The Queen of Salsa, Celia Cruz, is featured at this site from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Born in Cuba, Celia became a famous African-Caribbean singer, performed at the famous Tropicana cabaret in the 1950s, and left shortly after Castro came to power in 1960. A brief biography accompanies many still photos, 8 musical selections in the discography, and a visit to her dressing room where you can see the famous shoes and dresses she wore. Three lesson plans for grades K-12 explore immigration, history, geography, music theory, music history, and art. The entire site is also available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: The Arts