PBS Teachers™

PBS Teachers

Math

recommended links archive

"A member of Ryerson Polytechnic Institute's Department of Engineering and Computing brings you this award-winning site about the history and operations of the abacus. The site compares devices from different countries, gives an overview of the abacus's history, teaches how to use an abacus, offers instructions on making an abacus out of Legos, and offers recommended reading and links. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Canada's SchoolNet provides a colorful, useful way to describe and ""play"" with discrete mathematics, which studies combinatorial objects. The object types here are subsets, combinations, permutations, 8-Queens problem, pentominoes, permutations of multiset, partitions, Fibonacci sequences, and magic squares. Each object type has a description to get you started and a section where you can generate your own example. This is a helpful way to learn about a topic that can be difficult for many people."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This is a great place to start learning about banking, writing checks, using an ATM, and budgeting. Click on the 411 on Money Matters (also called Money Made Easy at http://thebeehive.linktier.com/moneymadeeasy/ ) and you can listen to a tutorial in English or Spanish about budgeting, individual development accounts, credit, and debt. Don’t wait until high school to get a grip on spending and saving, this site is useful for upper elementary and middle school students as well as adults. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you know that the Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces 37 million notes a day with a face value of approximately $696 million? The BEP prints billions of Federal Reserve Notes (paper currency), most U.S. postage stamps, Treasury securities, identification cards, naturalization certificates, and other special security documents. This site has information about the new currency, anti-counterfeiting, money facts, and information for collectors. The Kid's Area, Money Central Station, is aimed at children ages 5 to 13 and introduces anti-counterfeiting features that are present in the new 1996 and 1999 Series Federal Reserve Notes. This section requires ShockWave and can be difficult to navigate."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"After an introduction in the concept of the beads and columns, and how it relates to the decimal system of single digits, tens digits, and so on, you’ll have the basic understanding of how an abacus works. Use the cyber abacus to try adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing with beads. Instructions for each operation are given, along with practice exercises. The site is primarily for teachers to use to teach, but students can also follow the directions in the lessons. For images of many real abacuses, see http://www.alohama.com/abmuseum/index.shtml, the Abacus Museum."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"How much of a family's income is spent on raising the children? This study has been conducted from 1960 to the present, updated for consumer price index changes. It takes into account what families spend in each age range to raise a child from birth to age 18. Figures are included for both one and two parent families. The seven areas covered are: housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, child care and education, and miscellaneous. Compare this report to one previously selected from the USDA at http://www.usda.gov/cnpp/using2.html"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Data and Story Library is an online library of datafiles and stories that illustrate the use of basic statistics methods. High school math teachers and students will find a variety of topics of interest they can use to illustrate a statistical method. Topics include archaeology, music, weather, sports, census data, and the environment. Each story applies a particular statistical method to a set of data. Methods include causation, histogram, mean, median, probability, scatter plot, and many others. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Who says math has nothing to do with the real world? The creator of this site uses sabermetrics to present graphs and statistics. Each player in the Major Leagues since 2002 is represented with 10 sets of statistics including batting average, on base percentage, and percentage of strikeouts. A cool feature is that you can compare players in a side by side graph. Another neat use of math is the set of PitchZone charts where the author put a grid over strike zones of batters and color coded which pitches resulted in hits. One drawback to the site is not having the criteria labeled for the non-baseball literate among us. If you don’t know what BABIP is, you’ll need to have the local baseball whiz enlighten you."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site provides an interesting and informative look at the ways advertisers, the media, and public institutions ""get the math wrong."" Users will find a detailed glossary of math mistakes and a special section of fifteen puzzles and problems related to algebra, arithmetic, and geometry (answers provided)."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The NCES 2002 report indicates that in 2000, students aged 12 through 18 were victims of about 1.9 million total crimes of violence or theft at school. In 2001, 8 percent of students reported that they had been bullied at school in the last 6 months, up from 5 percent in 1999. Most tables and figures can be downloaded in PDF or a zipped Excel format. Previous statistics related to school crime and safety are found at the National Center for Education Statistics site: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/ssocs/ "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"From a Ph.D. thesis by a computer scientist at the University of British Columbia, this site provides a collection of knots viewed from a mathematical perspective. The images were created to visualize and manipulate mathematical knots in three and four dimensions. In knot theory, two embedded circles (knots) are considered equivalent if one may be smoothly deformed into the other without any cuts or self-intersections. This notion of equivalence may be thought of as the heart of knot theory. Some images require downloading."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Most people recognize a Venn diagram, but how about Johnson diagrams, which are featured at this site about logic? Johnson diagrams are a visual way to describe truth tables, mathematical tables used in logic to determine whether an expression is true or whether an argument is valid. Especially enlightening is the section of 16 permutations of two items using IF, AND, OR, NOT, and other possibilities. If you need help visualizing some of these ideas, this site will be very helpful. Some sections are interactive. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Bungee jumping Barbies? This activity will help you understand linear regression at the same time you get to drop Barbie on her head. The Math Lab is full of puzzles and activities to help you sharpen and, yes, ENJOY math! Middle and high school students can enhance their understanding of pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, statistics, and probability by playing with these activities. There is an extensive illustrated glossary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Download these eight PDF documents from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics to mathematics behind everyday life. The current topics are how math is used for CDs, digital animation, using DNA analysis, digital face recognition, stopping and preventing fires, cardiology and heart attacks, speeding up the Internet, and supercomputing. Most of us benefit from at least several of these technologies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

This graphically rich dictionary brings math terms to life with both a written definition and interactive or graphic examples of each math term. (Flash required)

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"There are three sections to this virtual exhibition from the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford: The Mathematicians, The Measurers, and The Collectors. The Measurers includes subsections about the instrument maker, music, weighing, gauging, surveying, measuring grain, and measuring cloth. Images represent photos of artifacts, engraved plates, maps, and pages of manuscripts. Images are also available in larger format. During the Renaissance, mathematics, especially geometry, was put to practical use such as cartography, navigation, and astronomy. The artifacts presented at this site reflect those practical uses. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Money, teens usually feel they don’t have enough of it. This site will give you advice on how to earn it, save it, spend it, track it, and invest it. There are sections for parents, teachers and younger kids. Don’t miss the “Try It” section which lets you try out writing a check, seeing where your paycheck goes before you even get your salary, and how much you really spent when you bought something on a credit card. Tools to help you figure out your spending choices are debt calculators and the Power of 72 which lets you figure out how long it will take your money to double at a given interest rate. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Energy Information Administration provides energy statistics from the U.S. government. They have summaries of the weekly supply estimates, prices, crude oil reserves and production, and refining and processing outputs. There are charts for weekly retail prices of diesel fuel and gasoline, indicating the increase from last year to this year. Additional information includes a petroleum primer on gasoline prices, consumer information on home heating fuel, and sort term and annual energy outlook. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Your parents probably had to learn how to use slide rules in school before calculators were invented. The National Museum of American History tracks teaching math from the early republic through the Cold War and the Information Age. Due to the advances of Soviet technology in the 1950s, educators in the United States developed “new math,” a method that placed more emphasis on learning mathematical principles than on mastering practical applications of math. Images of artifacts illustrate the narrative about each period of history and innovations in teaching mathematics. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Economic Policy Institute publishes an annual book about the state of the working class in the United States, rating the income, wages, jobs, wealth, poverty, CEO pay, minorities, women, inequality, and work hours for the previous year. There are fact sheets to download on each of these topics. The International Comparisons chapter compares the economic performance of the United States to the 19 other rich, industrialized countries. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This Webquest, brought to you by the School of Education at Louisiana State University, engages students in Internet research and spreadsheet creation to connect math with the mysteries surrounding the Titanic. The site includes evaluation rubrics, lists of recommended resources, and clear step-by-step procedures written for secondary level math students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Although the kids' section of this Web site is geared primarily towards social studies students and coin collectors, the teachers area contains lesson plans, related resources, and an online forum to help teachers connect currency and math. The site is appropriate for grade school students and is colorfully designed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The title of this site comes from the idea that often people scribble thoughts or sketch on the back of an envelope, and in this case, the site author wants you to think about the scale of things that are very large or very small. Topics include the order of magnitude, powers of ten, simplifying numbers, approximations, and how to use your body as a ruler and to measure angles. Some of these topics sound difficult, but they can be accessible to younger students also. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Sundials, water clocks, Greenwich Mean Time and lunar cycles are included in this site from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Although the site is text-heavy, it would provide good information for student research or background for a teacher developing word problems or experiments."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A report issued by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences calculates that a war with Iraq would cost between $99 billion and $1.9 trillion over the next 10 years, about ten times more costly than estimated by the Bush administration. In addition to the military activity costs, other included in costs are occupation, peacekeeping, reconstruction, humanitarian assistance, and cost of oil market disruptions. Tables and charts throughout the study provide statistical information of past wars and projections for a new war in Iraq. Further resources about the cost of war in Iraq can be found at http://www.amacad.org/publications/occasional.htm The report is only in pdf format online although print copies can be ordered at the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Climatic Data Center collects information about weather and climate related to severe events, “normals” data, hourly precipitation, and many other summaries. Some data goes back to 1945, such as the monthly climatic data for the world, so you can find the monthly temperature and precipitation around the world for a given period of time. Say you are researching a particular historical event in a given country, you can find out what the weather was like at the time, or plot those temperatures against an El Nińo year, or make sure you have historically accurate climate depicted in a story you are writing. Many results are displayed in PDF."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interbrand Surveys and Research conducts an annual survey for Business Week and reports on the top 100 brands in the world that have a value greater than $1 billion. The interactive table allows you to sort by column and has direct links to a brand’s corporate stock snapshot. Brand names are listed with their parent companies and show the rankings from 2001 through 2005. There is also a column indicating the percentage of change per brand, either positive or negative."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"How long does it take you to get to school or to work? Look over these reports from cities to see how many hours are wasted, waiting in traffic over the years 1982-2003. For example, commuters in Los Angeles spend an average of 93 hours in travel delay. That is almost 4 entire days a year, sitting in slow moving traffic! With the high price of gas, add in the wasted cost to the wasted time. The section on ""What does congestion cost us?"" states that in the 85 urban areas described in this report, in 2003, 2.3 billion gallons of fuel were wasted. All reports are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The AAA Fuel Gauge web site is derived from credit card transactions at over 60,000 stations around the country on a daily basis from data provided by the Oil Price Information Service. Compare your state or local gas prices to the national average, and the different averages for regular, mid priced, and premium gasoline, and diesel fuel. The Fuel Cost Calculator lets you estimate the cost of gas on a road trip by inputting your nearest large city of origin and destination, make, model, and year of your car. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"K-8 students can use this site to practice math concepts and receive immediate feedback on their answers. Correct answers are provided if the guess is incorrect. You can choose to browse by grade level or topic. Each topic provides an explanation, interactive practice, and challenge games."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This set of activities is not only fun, it is terrific for the student who needs to manipulate an object to make the connections of why some geometric rules apply. There are paper folding activities that allow you to create triangles, tessellations, and a clock face. You can see a method of using books to construct shapes on the blackboard if you don’t have other instruments for drawing. Multicultural math projects include using African bead patterns and Rangavalli patterns from India. Other activities also use low cost materials such as match sticks (you can substitute with toothpicks), string, and paper. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Exercise your brain and your body as you learn about graphing algebraic and trigonometric equations. There are six activities that illustrate the plotting of an equation on a four quadrant graph. For example, how would you illustrate the line y=mx+c for different values of m? What happens when the constant b is increased in the equation y=ax+b? Not for kinesthetic learners only, this is a great way to understand how an equation ""works."""

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"It is amazing what our brains and eyes seem to see. These optical illusions often appear as if they are in motion. Each one has a short description of what seems to be happening. There are “classic” and “modern” illusions, as well as color, spiral, and rotational illusions. Note: You don’t need to install the language pack to use the site so decline the option when you see the popup window."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Clearly narrated examples of understanding and solving algebra expressions make this an excellent site to help introduce or reinforce basic to more complex algebra topics. Topics covered include equations, inequalities, absolute value, exponents, polynomials, factoring, functions, and equations. For people taking an SAT or even GRE exam, this would be a great review site. The site requires Flash. The program is created by EleMaths Software. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This Internet project provides an understanding in the graphing of linear equations at the algebra 1 level. There are illustrated, interactive lessons covering the basic concepts that range from plotting ordered pairs to solving systems of equations. A pop-up scientific calculator is available at the site. The Plotter can plot functions, differentials and integrals, including trigonometric functions. This site is useful for algebra, trigonometry or calculus homework. Shockwave is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Wherever you go, there you are. This tutorial is designed to give you a good basic understanding of the principles behind Global Positioning Systems. Triangulation is usually given as the description of how positioning is calculated but it is more like “trilateration” because angles really aren’t used. GPS calculations are based on satellite transmissions that pinpoint locations on the earth. A glossary is included and animations help explain the process. Shockwave is required to run the tutorial."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Coin collectors are called numismatists, and this site is full of coin information. If you ever wondered about peculiarities in US coinage, you’ll probably find your answer here. There is a virtual money museum which also includes resources about paper money. Within the educational programs are transcripts and audio clips of the Money Talks radio show. You can carefully inspect the buffalo nickels, Continental Dollar, and the rare 1913 Liberty Head nickel in the Featured Coins section. Check your change before you spend it, you never know what you might be carrying around! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Do you fit in this category? ""Persons ages 15 to 24 averaged 5.5 hours of leisure time per day."" The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as paid work, childcare, volunteering, commuting, and socializing. The Census Bureau collects and processes the data through telephone interviews. Start with the summary to get the big picture and then check out the details. There is a lot of information to create charts and graphs and maybe compare your class to the national average. Back up to the home page of ATUS for details on how the survey was conducted and other resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"While not an extensive site, this animation demonstrates clearly how the Pythagorean theorem works. The first page has an animation without an explanation to let you see if you can figure out how the sum of the squares of the two sides adjacent to the right angle is always exactly equal to the square of the side opposite the right angle, the hypotenuse. If you are still not sure how this works, click on the next page to get a visual representation of how a^2 + b^2=c^2."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The life and works of Archimedes are presented along with images and animations of the Archimedes Screw, Stomachion (tiles similar to a tangram), the lever, Archimedean solids, and the Archimedes claw for upending and sinking enemy boats close to the harbor. Other topics include ancient Syracuse, stamps, and coins depicting Archimedes."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"How cool is this? You will find not only fun puzzles with solutions but how to MAKE some of those puzzles. Enjoy the visual creativity of geometry at this site full of puzzles, optical illusions, tessellations, tangrams, and math curiosities. For spaghetti lovers, don’t miss the pasta as edible geometry section with over 100 images of different pasta shapes. The site is also available in French and Italian."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Eureka! The Palimpsest (meaning “scraped again”) is the oldest surviving manuscript containing the work of Archimedes. The Palimpsest is a compendium of mathematical treatises by Archimedes and is the only source to use mechanical means to clarify his mathematical theorems. It is also the only source in original Greek of his description of the physics of flotation and the proof of specific gravity. The book was printed in the 10th century, a thousand years after Archimedes’ death. This site presents biographical information about Archimedes, history and conservation of the Palimpsest, and information about how the manuscript was created."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"While not in a fancy layout, this collection of puzzles will keep you thinking for hours with the many types of mind benders to ponder. There are math specific topics like arithmetic, geometry, logic, and probability, but there are also interesting language equations (12 = S of the Z), decisions (Monty Hall type questions), and even the way to win at Hi-Q. Solutions are provided for each type of puzzle. (Solution: 12 Signs of the Zodiac) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site for middle and high school students who are intrigued with math has some articles directed to students, extensive lists of state and national contests, and other free resources. You can download a program to produce well-formatted mathematical and scientific writing called LaTeX. There are some nifty flash animations in the lower left corner of the menu demonstrating different geometry, algebra, and trigonometry concepts which are all found in the Animated Proofs Gallery at http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Gallery/AoPS_G_Gallery.php You must be logged in as a Community member (free) to try out the Math Jams. Some other portions of the site require a fee based subscription. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"In 1994, math students at Swarthmore University began answering questions e-mailed by K-12 students; by 1998 there had been over 225 volunteer 'Doctors' from all corners of the globe. The students' questions are archived on the site according to grade range and topic. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Online tutorials from the University of Texas are a great way to preview, practice, and review essential Algebra 1A and 1B skills related to functions, representing functions in multiple formats (words, tables, graphs, and symbols) in the Four Corner Model, and using graphing calculators while practicing real world math. The tutorials are free and are based on the TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills)."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This collection of classroom lessons is designed by classroom teachers and university researchers to integrate the K-4 national standards in mathematics (NCTM) and astronomy (NSES) using NASA science resources. Math concepts include number and operations, algebra, geometry and measurement. The lessons are grouped into grades K-2 and 3-5 and are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Award-winning elementary educator Angela Giglio Andrews and Illinois's DuPage Children's Museum offer K-3 students colorful, challenging math problems. Each challenge is presented in the form of a story taken from the life of Aunty Math, her two nephews Barney and Danny, and her niece Gina. Past challenges and parent/teacher tips are archived at the site as well."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"As you get settled in your new classroom this year, crunch some numbers related to students in elementary, middle, high schools and college. You can investigate statistics of state expenditure per student, student/teacher ratios, and the cost of higher education. A better understanding of these facts and figures will give you an insight to your own school highlights and shortcomings. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

There are lots of fun math activities to create using information at this site about Baseball Parks using the Facts and Figures section. Students can practice their protractor skills by measuring angles related to baseball field orientation. They can use statistics about seating capacity and cost to build the park to figure out the most expensive seat or rank the domed stadiums by size. There are many ways to engage students in practicing math skills by using data many will find interesting.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Learn the basics of banking, checking, savings, investing, and budgeting. Different portals are given for upper elementary students, middle school, and high school students. Try out the online ATM for practice, use the calculator, or search the glossary of banking terms if you need help understanding new terms. There is also an assessment for each grade level as well as teaching tips, which can be downloaded in pdf documents. Audio and captions are a benefit for students and adults who learn best by listening or prefer to read along with the audio. Flash is required. Requires registration. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Professor Margo Lynn Mankus of George Mason University prepared this entertaining site designed to help students understand the base ten counting system. The site includes a user-friendly though detailed java applet which allows students to manipulate base ten counting units in an online game, with accompanying teacher materials."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Add your way to victory with this baseball math game. Players can choose either addition or multiplication and difficulty level. (Flash required)

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"An actuary is someone trained in evaluating the current financial implications of future contingent events. Huh? An actuary is a mathematician dealing with probabilities in insurance, banking, and investment organizations. Career information for actuary programs, exams, and an interactive skills assessment quiz are found on this site. There is a section with information about actuarial scholarships for minority students. Read about a day in the life of several actuaries to learn more about a career for students who love math."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Start with ""I want to be an architect,"" which takes you to a page to deduce what kind of people live in different dwellings. Check your answers to advance through the section about choosing a site to build. Options are city, town, tropical forest, desert, and mountainside. Design your floor plan according to the number of people and types of rooms you want in your house. Clicking underlined words will pop up a window with definitions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Beginning algebra tutorials will help students who need review or are being introduced to topics related to fractions, real numbers, algebraic expressions, graphing equations, exponents, and polynomials. While the tutorials are written for undergraduates, high school students will be able to benefit from the concepts. Each topic has objectives, examples, and practice problems. Reinforced throughout the site is the idea that math skills, like musical or athletic skills, rely on practice."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This column from ESPN brings a mathematical perspective to sports by engineer Jonathan Sills. It covers topics such as analyzing a golfer’s long-term chances of earning and retaining a spot on the PGA Tour, the complications of sports scheduling, and art of measuring home run distances. In the columns, Sills proposes variables, discusses components, and analyzes resulting equations. Sports fans can see the applicability of mathematics in athletic situations, a great hook for secondary students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"For the most up-to-date financial news and information, Bloomberg is one of the sites to investigate. Stock quotes, Dow trading, currency rates, equity indices, commodities, leading and lagging movers, interest rates and mortgage rates are all provided. Click on the Chart icon to access the Dow Jones Industrial Average over the past 12 months to see the enormous impact September 11th had on the stock market."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Need to brush up on your algebra, trig, or calculus? This site for Missouri students can be accessed for general information by any student. Each math course has three levels: the Basic level corresponds to grade levels 7-9, the Intermediate level corresponds to grade levels 10-12, and the Advanced level is what college students at the University of Missouri, Rolla expects from their students. Take time to read instructions for first time users to learn how to navigate the site. Some documents are available in PDF format. Java is required for navigation. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Have fun trying these daily brain teasers or select your favorite type, from cryptography, logic puzzles, letter equations, probability, and computational math puzzles. Most provide a hint to find the answer as well as the solution. Submitted by users of the site, the puzzles are tested and rated on a basis of difficulty. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Oliver Byrne wrote a book in 1847 of the first six books of The Elements of Euclid where he used color coded diagrams and symbols rather than text to help students learn more easily. Each of Euclid’s books has Byrne’s version as well as links to a Java version from mathematician David Joyce. These java applets to allow viewers to manipulate diagrams related to postulates and constructions. The Byrne book is hosted by the University of British Columbia Mathematics Department. Students will need to become familiar with writing style of over 150 years ago, in particular, the letter F often written for the letter S. For visual learners, this site should be especially beneficial when learning about geometry."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"While this is a commercial site, the math presented in this section is useful and appealing to elementary school students. Children help the characters in the Chocolate Factory solve math problems related to number sense, calculations, geometry, time, measurement, and data handling. The activities have two levels, with helpful suggestions if an answer is incorrect. The activities are tied to the UK Numeracy Strategy. The Jargon Buster serves as the glossary for math terms. The parents section provides ideas of how to help children with math at home."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What founding father proposed Daylight Savings Time? Find out how humans have marked time through the weeks and years. Different calendars are represented including the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic religions as well as Chinese, Mayan, and other cultures. There is a timeline with interesting calendar facts about how and when different calendar systems have been adopted, vernal equinoxes, atomic time, and leap seconds. P.S. It was Benjamin Franklin in 1784."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Centuries ago, people navigated by using the stars and other celestial objects. Math is used in sight reduction, the process of deriving from a sight the information needed for establishing a line of position. Modern celestial navigation is based on spherical trigonometry, but you don’t need to know trigonometry to use this site. Navigational instruments such as the chronometer, astrolabe, cross-staff and quadrant are presented. Even in the age of the GPS (Global Positioning Systems), sailors still learn to read the skies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

There are seven runes, each a different geometric riddle for you to puzzle out and find the Cup of Hiding, or Healing, of the Sun, of Virtue, and of the Earth. The geometric formulas to work with are finding the area of a triangle, a square, a circle, and a trapezoid. Take your time to investigate each of the runes and their clues or puzzles. This would be a fun group activity, as you embark on a quest to find the cups.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This audio series from Sound Money breaks down one of your consumer dollars to see why things cost what they do. Featured purchases are the cost of gas, cigarettes, airline tickets, and the cost of raising a child. For every dollar you spend on any one of these items, you hear how many pennies (or what percent) goes to separate expenses such as clothing, health care, housing, food, transportation, education, and other miscellaneous expenses. There are lots of other money topics at the main Sound Money site. RealAudio is required for the radio shows. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interested in chaos theory, fractals, non-linear dynamics, or mathematics in general? According to the author, ""a fractal is a geometric pattern exhibiting an infinite level of repeating, self-similar detail that can't be described with classical geometry."" This site is about iteration, bifurcation, universality, dimensions, Julia Sets and Mandelbrot Sets. With QuickTime, you can see animations of some fractals. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Chisenbop is a Korean method of doing basic arithmetic using your fingers. With Chisenbop, the right hand stands for the values zero through nine. The left hand represents multiples of ten. The counting module is interactive so you can manipulate the numbers. There are short audio and video clips about how to add, subtract, multiply and divide using this method. The files all require RealPlayer."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"From sundials to the atomic second, Britannica.com hosts a site about the development of instruments that measure time over the centuries. Most people have heard of sundials, which date back to at least the 16th century BCE, but have you ever heard of a clepsydra? You’ll also investigate an astrolabe, candle clock, sandglass, weight-driven clock, spring-driven clock, pendulum clock, quartz watch and a cesium atomic clock. Each instrument features a description, illustrations, parts of the instrument and some even include a Quick Time animation to demonstrate how it works."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Every year, more than 8 million college students receive financial aid. This site helps you understand the costs of college, how to borrow money responsibly, how to avoid scholarship scams, budgeting information, and understand the vocabulary surrounding financial aid. For adult students planning to return to college, use the adult section for further forms of financial aid extended to adult learners. This site is sponsored by the Coalition of America’s Colleges and Universities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Don’t wait until your post-high school years to learn about the pitfalls of credit, debt, financial aid from this site about personal finance education and credit counseling. Young Money is written by young journalists, covering topics of focuses on money management, entrepreneurship, careers, and investing. Some of the more enticing subjects are travel, technology, and cars, how to get the best deals, how to save money, and what is new."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The timeline highlights events in computer history from 1945 to 1990. Biographical sketches of pioneers are included. Exhibits are about Internet History and Microprocessor Timeline. Special topics are computers, people and pop culture, software, components, robots and artificial intelligence, networks, and companies."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Navigating this site is much like a subway map, but instead of taking the yellow line to the stadium, you’ll take the yellow line to tessellations, crystal structure, 4 color theorem, sphere packing, hyperbolic geometry, and Islamic art. Transfer from Islamic art to hypercubes. The themes (subway lines) are: spatial visions, form and structure, randomness and order, inner and outer space, mapping, patterns and space filling, and higher dimensions. This is a really fun site to explore! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Consumer Action is a non-profit organization founded to support consumer rights, compare prices on credit cards, and publishing consumer education materials in many languages. Some topics high school students should check into are credit cards, cars, and phone services. A recent example of a report is comparing 140 credit cards from 45 issuers for the 2004 Credit Card Survey, which also documents penalty fees and rates, ""zero interest"" introductory offers, and cash advance rates. This organization gives you the ammunition to be a more educated consumer. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Created as a site to promote consumer literacy among young adults, you’ll be introduced to financial topics such as renting an apartment, car loans, and credit cards by entering the student, parent, or teacher areas. Students will find interesting games that provide facts and reinforcement without being didactic. Teachers will find detailed unit plans, and parents will find tips, resources and activities to help their soon to be independent children along the way. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Convergence is an online magazine of resources to help teach via mathematics history. This magazine is sponsored by the Mathematical Association of America and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Algebra, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, probability and statistics are topics covered. Problems posed can be from as long ago as 1500 BCE and they still stretch your brain to figure them out just as they did over 3000 years ago. Important events from the history of math are found in “On This Day.” Quotation selections are from personalities from Douglas Adams (Life, the Universe and Everything) to Albert Einstein. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you know that 12 inches equals 0.01515 Chains? For all those difficult to figure conversions of units, this is the place for you. Say you're in the middle of an exciting book about sailing in a storm and want to know just how fast 120 knots is. If you use the English system, it is 138.12 mph, and if you use the Metric system, it is 222.24 km/hr! You'll find the more common units of length, volume, and area as well as less familiar energy/work, pressure, and power units."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Fifteen colorful counting and math games help young children understand basic number concepts. The time game matches time on analog and digital clocks or watches. The sorting game questions the child on the reason for choosing a particular way to sort the objects on the page, so there is no single correct answer. Other games practice height and volume. Each game has directions and some have levels of difficulty to choose from. Teachers can link to other activities to practice the concepts. The games can also be downloaded in PC and Mac versions. The online versions require Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The California Attorney General collects, analyzes, and reports statistical data related to crime. Key facts on crime can be viewed in chart format, PDF format, or data sets. The Statistics section has many details of types of crime, demographics, law enforcement and corrections although most of these are in PDF format rather than downloadable data sets. The Crime Clock shows how often a variety of crimes are committed on average in California. There are detailed graphics for the criminal justice timeline 1822-2000 and a flowchart of criminal justice from the initial crime to release from corrections. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interesting math facts and trivia are the focus of this site. Did you know the word ""zero"" comes from the Arabic word for ""empty""? Try the age math problems to figure out someone's age and other cool tricks. There are tricks to help you figure out square roots, divisibility, basic math facts, and algorithms to figure out days of the week in the past and future. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Bank of Canada has several online exhibits about currency. Visit the Exhibit section to learn about the Euro, and try the “Count Your Pennies” activity about shopping in the first part of the 20th Century in Canada. An interactive game found in the Learning Centre is called “Dig It”, where the player excavates to find artifacts. Short “features” highlight the use of cocoa beans as money, how two bits makes a quarter, the goof about the Canadian $4.00 note, and milk tokens as payment. Flash is required for the Dig It game and the Count Your Pennies activity. The site is also available in French."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"SuDoku may look like a magic square, but these puzzles are solved with a different method. The only rule is that every row, column and box of 3x3 cells must contain the numbers 1 through 9 exactly once. Sound simple? Not when there are 9 boxes in one SuDoku puzzle. Start in the Archive and look for an easy one to try first. You can print them off and even get hints if you fill in part of the puzzle on the Drawer, or get the answer if you REALLY need it. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This online exhibit is a collaboration between the Center for Polymer Studies and the Boston Museum of Science, based on current research by scientists around the world. The focus of the exhibit is the emergence of patterns in Nature from physical and biological processes. There are fractal images of fingering and branching patterns by termites, lightning, and erosion. There are also sound files of music set to heartbeats from an EKG. Explanations accompany each type of fractal. Audio and video clips require some plug-ins."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"From children’s literature specialist Carol Otis Hurst, this section of her site focuses on using picture books to introduce young children to gathering and analyzing data represented on graph and charts. Brief descriptions of children’s developmental stages aid parents and teachers in understanding readiness to grasp concepts. Suggested activities and book titles are given. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Scientific Instruments Systems offers this Web reference on basic operations, conversions and measurement, and advanced mathematics. Visitors will find information on calculating interest, area, graphing, statistical distributions, and much more. The information is also available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Follow TREZ, the Alley Cat, for a virtual tour of the United States Treasury Building. Learn about savings bonds, money, banking, starting your own business, taxes, and counterfeit money. You can find out what large denominations of paper money look like. Become a music store employee or a pizza delivery person and find out how your income is taxed. There is a Saving Bond Redemption Calculator to find out how much your bonds are worth since you bought them."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Digger the dog and his three friends take primary and elementary school age children on adventures where they learn to solve problems, read maps, and think creatively. The 5-7 year age group math topics are about time and money, the 7-9 year age group topics include understanding distance and purchasing supplies, and the age 9-11 topics includes graphs comparing French francs to English pence and about bike speed. Adults may need to assist children with British terms such as pounds, pence, and Euros."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What do you think an engineer does? This is the definition the site provides: ""Engineering is the application of math and science to create something of value from our natural resources."" Learn about different fields like aerospace, materials, chemical, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering. There are puzzles, a scavenger hunt, and a Jeopardy-like game called TechnoBabble that you can play against an opponent. Be sure to check all the exhibits in Cool Stuff, where you learn about the engineering behind water slides, roller coasters, fighter jets, high performance gear, and test your own design skills. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Special sections for K-2, 3-4, and 5-8 make this site easy to find age appropriate math concepts. The different math sections include addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, number sense, negative numbers, telling time, measurement, counting money and early algebra practice. There are also MindTwisters and a monthly math challenge problem. As with many educational sites which provides free content, some unobtrusive advertising is found at Dositey. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Dow Jones Industrial Average began as 12 “smokestack” companies in 1896. For a complete listing of the companies placed on and taken off the Dow Index from 1885 to 1995, click on the “Historical Component List” in the “Dow Ins and Outs” section. The Dow Historical Timeline has an interactive graph of monthly averages from 1895 to the present, with markers for milestones. Look under “Dow Trivia” for the Dow Birthday Return Calendar. Put in your birth date and see how much money would you have made if your parents had invested $1,000 the day you were born. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The World Resources Institute, an environmental think tank, provides a collection of on-line reports about the environmental, social, and economic trends that shape our world. Data is supplied by over a dozen international and US government sources. Middle and high school students can use statistical, graphic, and analytical data to compare among countries and other criteria. The five information tools are: a searchable database, data tables, country profiles, maps, and feature articles on each of the ten topics areas: costal and marine ecosystems, water resources, climate and atmosphere, population and health, economics, energy and resources, biodiversity, agriculture, forests and grasslands, and environmental governance. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston hosts the Economic Adventure with a primer on the living standards and economic growth, glossaries about economic growth, an investment game, information on the time value of money, and a lesson plan for secondary students on innovation and intellectual property. There is also a section called Rising Standards Gazette which provides information about New England's economic history over the centuries. PDF documents comprise much of the content at the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Students participating in the ThinkQuest competition designed this educational introduction to the stock market. Included are company profiles, a history of the stock market, a glossary of stock terminology, information about different types of stocks, and a stock market simulation. (The simulation requires that users provide an e-mail address.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you know that Egyptians had a different system for using fractions than the one we use today? This site has some background history and ways to calculate Egyptian fractions, as well as an online calculator. Some of the math concepts are for high school students, but some concepts are appropriate for elementary or middle school and would be a great connection while studying ancient Egypt in Social Studies."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Learn about the Egyptian decimal system and the seven symbols used to solve ancient math problems.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Since 1920, the Clerk of the House has collected and published the official vote counts for federal and congressional elections from each state. With all the rich data at this site, students and teachers can create detailed graphs and charts to illustrate many results of the voting for a given year, political party, and write in candidates. Statistics from recent elections are available as both HTML and PDF formats while elections from 1920 to 1990 are available only in PDF format. Note download times can be long. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Mathematics Across the Curriculum from Dartmouth College houses a collection of articles about math in a variety of subject areas. For example, the section on data analysis includes articles about cancer likelihood and interpreting crime statistics. Each article has a summary and the math concepts covered. These articles are arranged in the Little Bookshelf in the Big Woods for teachers grouped by primary, intermediate, middle, and high school. Hey, what 5th grade teacher can pass up the math connection to the science article ""Human Factors in the Design of Spacecraft"" which talks about throwing up in space? To download individual articles, you need to submit your name and email address, but articles are free. Teachers may want to provide downloaded copies rather than have students submit their personal information. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The purpose of the Elementary Math Club is to stimulate children’s curiosity and positive attitude about math. The activities from the University of Texas UTOPIA site include a math mobile, number paths, guess the number magic trick, a human counting machine, and a math mural. Each activity has a summary, mathematical goal, Texas standard correlation, and list of materials for the teacher. The lesson kits can be downloaded in PDF. There is quite a bit of background information for parents or teachers who are working on the activities with the children. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Jos van Uden, a Dutch Java programmer, supplied the Java applet that forms the centerpiece of this site. Visitors with Netscape 2.0 or Internet Explorer 3.0 and above will enjoy manipulating tangram pieces in a series of puzzles."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Engineer Girl website is from the National Academy of Engineering and focuses on the opportunity that engineering represents to women and girls. Girls can get ideas about careers in engineering, profiles of women engineers, and what kind of classes to take when planning for college. Don't think engineers only design bridges or roads, thank goodness there is a chocolate engineer who designs the machines that make and wrap our favorite candy! Engineers are also vital to improvements in sports and medical equipment, designing cities of the future, and creating new telecommunication devices. Don't miss the Great Engineering Achievements pages with modern achievements, the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World and 7 Wonders of the Modern World."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The American Society for Engineering Education has a site for high school students interested in engineering careers. The site introduces you to the different fields of engineering, profiles famous engineers, and offers guidance about courses to take while in high school as well as how to choose and pay for the right engineering college for you. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"During World War II, thousands of people worked to crack codes from the enemy. The Enigma code was broken by mathematician Alan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park in England, the home of the British Code and Cipher School. The German's Enigma machine could code in over 150 million million million different ways! Not only that, but it changed to another code with that flexibility on a daily basis. This site from the Imperial War Museum also includes background on early codes and ciphers. Try your own codes based on rules given at the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The World of Mathematical Equations website presents “extensive information on solutions to various classes of ordinary differential, partial differential, integral, functional, and other mathematical equations.” Basic introductions to each type open the particular section of the site, followed by examples of exact solutions and links to methods for solving them. The Equation Index provides an extensive listing of equations from the more commonly known quadratic equation to very complex equations with long names. Individual entries open in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Learn math by folding paper! What angles and shapes can you make from folding a square of paper? Did you know that the fold called the ""squash"" is actually a bisection of an angle? You will also find diagrams to show you how to fold several shapes and the history of origami. There is more to this art of paper folding than just creating beautiful shapes. Advanced math students can also demonstrate complex mathematical ideas with origami."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"“Well, it fit together when I bought it!” If you have ever unpacked something like a set of rubber stamps from its original box and tried to get them to fit back in, you’ll understand the importance of packing objects. It may seem like a trivial topic, but it can mean big savings for companies or engineers who strive to package items safely and without waste. There are algorithms to figure these problems out. Many images at this site are static but some show an animation of circles rolling around inside rectangles to illustrate different scenarios. Why would you ever want to know how to pack squares on a sphere? The inventor of the disco ball did. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Escape from Knab simulation can be used in a variety of middle and high school classes in mathematics, social studies, family and consumer education. The goal is to teach financial strategies and decision making by having students earn money to pay for their transportation home from the fictitious planet, Knab. Activity sheets accompany the monthly lessons, which are based on various state and national math, economics, and life skills standards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site lets you visualize the mathematical structure behind Escher’s drawings. The project is a joint initiative between a university in the Netherlands and UC Berkeley. Check out the method that Escher used to create a grid for his drawings, then he rotates and applies a different scale to the grid to create his variations. Use the five step method described on this site for unraveling, redesign, tile, greyscale, finish the drawing. The Droste Effect is from the Dutch chocolate company which has an image of itself on it’s own packaging. There are some cool animations on the site. Take your time, there is a lot to investigate. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Ethnomathematics studies how people within various cultures develop techniques to explain and understand their world within a mathematical context. These snapshots are short descriptions of over a dozen cultures such as Incan quipus, Native American petroglyphs, African number words derived from body parts, and geometry in Amish quilts. These short descriptions are good for using as examples and also for launching further study that can connect math to social studies or math research in the library."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The British Columbia Institute of Technology has created a matrix of mathematics topics and technology topics and resources where topics intersect. For example, if you choose the math topic Algebra & Geometry, go down the technology list to environmental health, and click on the results to find an application of Algebra and Geometry to Environmental Health. Who would have thought integral calculus would have a forestry application? The example demonstrated is “How much water goes under the bridge, or through a flood diversion? Farmland, towns and people's lives depend on the correct answer!” Real mathematics and technology applications."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Topics include mental math, algebra I, algebra II, geometry, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, set theory and theory components. Most topics have short tutorials with illustrations and examples. Click on ""Introductory"", ""Moderate"", or ""Advanced"" to try some exercises. Hints and solutions are provided for exercises."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"In 1995, the cost to raise a 15 year old in a family with an average income was $8,701. In 2003 it was $10,560! The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion from the U.S. Department of Agriculture provide estimates of the cost of raising children from birth to age 17. Yearly estimates from 1995 are available in PDF format and provide a great set of data to use in a math classroom. You can even see the method used to make these calculations in the section marked Equations Used in Multivariate Analyses. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Membership is not required to benefit from the multimedia activities, teacher forums, and monthly newsletters found at this interactive site. The activities are real-time correlations between equations and graphs that help students visualize and experiment with many topics, ranging from elementary algebra to pre-calculus. Each activity includes tips on using the tools, teaching suggestions, and the capability to input your own data. The newsletters include articles, math related news and a scavenger hunt. The activities require ShockWave and lesson plans require a PDF reader. Free membership is required to access lesson plans."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Exploring data offers curriculum support materials for teachers of introductory statistics, and provides activities, worksheets, overhead transparency masters, datasets and assessments. Topics covered include boxplots, datasets, dotplots, histograms, scatterplots, stemplots, probability, sampling and other statistics methods. Some topics have applets, requiring Java.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The common theme at this site is the apparent random behavior which actually forms a pattern. Hands on labs and simulations demonstrate patterns occurring in nature such as growing a forest from a single tree and termite tunnel patterns. Hands on activities provide discussion questions to consider as students work through the project. Some specific topics include Pascal’s Triangle, fractals, and measurement. There is a link to student activity guides. Flash is required for some sections of the site and some simulations require downloaded software. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you know that in 2001, there were 270 million turkeys raised for Thanksgiving dinners? Each data entry from the Census Bureau consists of a collection of statistics pertinent to a particular holiday or special observance. Students can use the data which comes from demographic and economic subject areas to create their own word problems. The possibilities of graphing, charting, calculating, and creating math word problems are endless. The majority of the statistics are from 1997-2002 with most years having the same topics, so statistics can be tracked over the years. There are 76.6 million citizens enrolled in school, preschool to college, as of Census Day 2000. Now, how many turkeys would each of those students have if only students ate turkey?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Some mathematical constants are familiar to most secondary math students, for example, the Golden Mean and the growth rate of the Fibonacci sequence. This site provides access to lesser-known constants that will intrigue the inquisitive advanced math student. This site introduces the student to over 100 constants, each constant with a written description, formulas, and references for further reading. Some provide illustrations to assist the viewer."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Written for secondary students, this site introduces the Federal Reserve’s purpose, history, structure, and functions. Activities include following how a check clears through the banking system and a simulation of how monetary policy decisions affect the economy. There is a teacher guide with printable quizzes and lesson plans. The site is available in Flash or HTML format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The physicist Enrico Fermi used to pose questions to his students such as “How long would it take for you to eat your weight in food?” To solve these types of problems, you need to consider some assumptions before you begin your computations. The objective of Fermi problems is to arrive at reasonable estimates and state the assumptions you use. This site has several student examples that have been critiqued to give teachers an idea of how to evaluate Fermi Problems. Follow this with a link to many Fermi problems at http://www.physics.uwo.ca/science_olympics/events/puzzles/fermi_questions.html"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Fibonacci, Lucas, and Pascal’s work are highlighted at this site. Pascal discovered the arithmetical triangle, an important concept in nature. Fibonnaci and Lucas numbers involve the Golden Section, meaning that a certain length is divided in such a way that the ratio of the longer part to the whole is the same as the ratio of the shorter part to the longer part. This ratio appears in the human body, the construction of the Parthenon, and growth patterns found in nature, such as a pinecone. The home page allows you to view up to the 70th Fibonacci number, up to 14 Pascal triangle dimensions, and up to 10,000 decimal places for pi. The site is offered in English, German, and Serbian."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"NCTM, the U.S. Department of Education, and the National Science Foundation team up to provide this colorful, practical site built around math's everyday applications. Challenges cover questions related to health, transportation, food, and more. Each challenge includes fun statistics, related resources, and math resources for parents."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Students of all ages learn about earning income, and spending, saving, borrowing, investing, and managing their money. The materials at the four levels (grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12) and are based on national standards. The activity for high school students gives a visual representation of how much you can accumulate over the years depending on the age you start to invest in savings. You can fill in your own age, monthly savings, and interest rate. For example, if you started saving $100.00 per month at age 18, at 5% interest, you’d have a quarter of a million dollars by the time you were 65. Play around with the chart and see the differences between when you start to save in high school versus saving in your 30s or 40s. You don’t need to purchase the curriculum to find a sample activity and online lessons related to specific topics for each grade grouping. Some lessons and the 35 page glossary are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Flash Math Creativity is an online site about the book of the same title, and is about Flash technology related to math. The site is cool for non-code-literate viewer to browse through and see the cool programs running. For the code-literate who love to create their own programs, they can look at the code provided by the authors in the book version and try it out on their own.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

The activities presented here allow students to study mathematics by doing real-life architecture to walk through the floor plan design process. Look for measurement and drawing tips as you create a scale drawing on graph paper or using a computer drawing program. Key terms and symbols are defined. The activities are tied to middle school state math standards.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Did you ever think that the people who get you safely from one place to another on a plane use math and science every day? Air Traffic Controllers must deal with distance-rate-time problems all the time on the job. The site is geared to middle school students and activities are tied to National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards and National Science Education Standards (NSES). There are six problems with experiments and six different methods for calculating the number of seconds for each plane to arrive at the point where their routes merge or for the trailing plane to catch up with the leading plane. Documents are in PDF and videos require QuickTime.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Calories, grams, servings, percentages . . . no wonder making sure you eat a balanced diet according to the Food Guide Pyramid can be confusing. The colorful booklet can be used for math class to calculate the appropriate number of calories or servings per day. Students can experiment with quantities found in serving size by using measuring spoons and cups. The publication is available online only in PDF format. Teachers will benefit from using this teacher's guide, also in PDF format only."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The US Census Bureau provides ample data for creating graphs and charts related to immigration of people from all regions of the world including Asia and Oceania. Reports describe the foreign-born population in the United States, profiling demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, such as region of birth, geographic distribution in the United States, age, educational attainment, earnings, and poverty status. Multimedia features include an Interactive ""Pop Quiz"" (get it? Population quiz?) about the U.S. foreign-born population. The quiz uses Flash but is also available in text. Some files are in PowerPoint, PDF and Excel spreadsheet format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Check out Independence Day 2006 through the numbers.150 million hot dogs will be consumed, $201.9 million was the value of fireworks imported from China in 2005, and 34 million foreign-born residents in the United States accounted for 12 percent of the nation’s total population in 2004. Many more statistics related to July 4th are available at this page from the US Census Bureau. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Explore almost 400 intricate images in the fractal gallery at this site. Fractals are both art and math, you can’t do one without appreciating the other. The Fractals for Laymen section explains that fractals are shapes that, when you look at a small part of it, has a similar (but not necessarily identical) appearance to the full shape. There are descriptions on how fractals are created, colored, and how to download software to create your own."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Familiarize yourself with the rules of this fraction game and have fun creating flag designs with the designated fractions. You can choose to paint by half, quarters, and combinations of quarters and halves and then the program will pick colors for you to paint your design by clicking in the flag. One drawback is that there is no help provided if the fraction portions are incorrect, you can only advance if you have painted to correct fractions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A colorful tutorial on fractions helps children learn about equivalent fractions, mixed and improper numbers, adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions. The site doesn’t provide practice on all topics but this would be a good review site for upper elementary and middle school students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site from the Environmental Protection Agency lets you compare gas mileage, greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution ratings, and safety information for new and used cars and trucks. You select a year, make, and model to find city and highway mileage per gallon. Fuel inefficient vehicles will be labeled as “gas guzzlers.” Track gas prices daily or weekly by state. You may think those Ferraris look cool, but they have the worst gas mileage of all the rated cars, with 8 MPG in the city compared to the highest rated at 61 MPG in the city."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Find fourteen games to play including practice counting money, measurement, algebra, graphing coordinates, secret codes, order of operations, and fractions. These games let you customize problem difficulty, and often offer tips if you give an incorrect answer. The money changing game allows you to play with money from five nations."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site provides a fun way for elementary students to reinforce basic math skills through interactive online activities about making correct change, fractions, and computation. For teachers, there's the opportunity to create customized online quizzes for your students. You and your students will also enjoy the language arts and geography games on this site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Connexions is a site from Rice University which hosts free courses and tutorials. This courses about Functions covers sets, relations, logarithmic, trigonometric, polynomial, and algebraic functions. Practice exercises with solutions, figures, a glossary, and an index supplement the descriptions, and can serve as a text for high school students. The course can be downloaded in a 313 page PDF.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site highlights the best and the worst of statistical graphics, the type of graphics that are very clear and accurate in the data they represent, and those that are not only misleading, but outright lies. Each representation has a description of what it does well or poorly. Charles Minard’s graphic representing the disastrous result of Napoleon's failed Russian campaign of 1812 is said to be the best statistical graph ever created. And once you read about Florence Nightingale’s unique coxcomb graphic, you’ll understand that she was much more than a famous nurse. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Geometry Center from the University of Minnesota collects ten programs to allow you to manipulate online software to create tilings, parabolas, symmetries, and other advanced mathematical concepts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Take a stroll in this mathematical art gallery, full of fractals. There are Mandelbrot fractals, iterated and self-similar structures, and Quaternionic fractals which are in four-dimensional space. Creating these images requires skill in C++ and advanced math skills, but anyone can appreciate the beauty of the results. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"No, this site won’t tell you how to win at gambling, but it will introduce you to the probabilities of gambling wins and losses related to lotto, scratch-off games, roulette and poker machines and how the games are geared to ensure that the “house” continues to win. Intended for high school students and teachers, there are lesson plans and student activity sheets (all in PDF format) related to math. The site is produced by an Australian help line for people with gambling problems."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Here are plenty of games to keep your mind active. Marsmoney, NumberHunt, Colorama, and NumberCruncher are appropriate for elementary and older students to practice basic facts, estimation, patterns, and order of operations. Try out the visual, memory, and word games too, but they can be more difficult than the math games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"While this site is aimed at the United Kingdom math levels, the review notes are just as helpful if you are in the US or any other country. This is a great math review site for high school students, with topics ranging from decimals and fractions to quadratic equations, intercept theorem, and histograms. Each topic has a short description, an example, and illustrations if applicable. Don’t wait until your final exam to check out this site, use it when you are stuck on a new concept or to review before quizzes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Learn about the 5 platonic solids: cubes, dodecahedrons, icosahedrons, octahedrons, and tetrahedrons. If you think some of these terms are foreign, don’t miss the 13 Archimedean Solids. Most polyhedra are created with a generating triangle, which reflects a triangle across each of its edges over and over. Even if you aren’t familiar with the advanced math, the descriptions and models will help you understand these shapes and how they work. Models are in VRML and Java that can be manipulated. Audio files provide pronunciations for the polysyllabic solids."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Incan history and architecture of Machu Picchu and Cuzco and how they relate to geometry are featured at this site. You'll also find information and images of the Nazca geometric figures. Solve puzzles of these images by moving the pieces with your mouse. There is a page of information about quipus, the series of knotted cords which served as numeric records. Puzzles require Java and you might not notice time passing as you put these Escher-like shaped puzzles together. You may want to turn the sound on your computer down if you don't care for the music. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What are a Flat Torus and a Flat Klein Bottle? These 2D spaces have no edges or boundaries, but the area is finite. Experiment with how these work by putting together a puzzle, running a maze, or tic-tac-toe. Kali is a game where you draw symmetrical patterns based on 17 tiling groups. The KaleidoTile creates tessellations of a sphere, Euclidean and hyperbolic planes. There is something here for any grade level. Games require Java."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Swarthmore's Math Forum investigates a different math puzzler each week at this site. Past problems have dealt with pizzas, flags, baseball, kites, the Daytona Speedway, and dog houses. Answers and links to elementary-level problems are also available on the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Lines, numbers, curves, and solids, this site by a math teacher in Hawaii has them all. Each is good for introducing or reinforcing concepts, such as large and small numbers, scientific notation in the Number section. In all sections, geometry is demonstrated in the real world, such as symmetry in plants, hexagons in snowflakes, and the curve of a baseball flying through the air is a parabola. The section on solids links to a unit created by the author at the Math Forum."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Technology is part of all of our daily lives. Test your tech IQ related to technology careers by taking the quiz to find out a variety of jobs are in the technology field. In addition to science careers, math related technology careers include computer programming, manufacturing, and engineering. Each career has information about the type of work involved, education required, and other facts about the job. There is a teacher’s guide in PDF format which includes lesson plans and ideas for how to use this site which intends to get middle and high school students interested in a variety of technology careers. The multimedia version requires Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

The Girl Scouts reminds us that math, science, and technology are all around us. This site features using math in careers like civil engineering, computer programming, and pharmacy. Four games practice cryptography (writing secret messages), making mandalas, thinking and brain pathways, and creating digital music. Games require Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"We were supposed to “go metric” in the 1970s, but it never happened. The U.S. Metric Association advocates that the U. S. convert to the International System of Units, or metric system. Part of the site is available to USMA members only, but anyone can use the materials found under the heading “Metric system information” with useful guides on understanding the metric system and why we should be using metric system rather than our current English system. There is metric system information for teachers and some detailed flash cards in PDF format. There are even metric cartoons. Get prepared to celebrate National Metric Week, which is held the week containing October 10 (get it? 10/10). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site provides mini-lessons and worksheets for pre-algebra and algebra on topics like negative numbers, prime factorization, and probability. The geometry section has a calculator that calculates perimeter, lateral and surface areas, and volume of plane and solid geometric figures. You can browse thousands of previously answered questions or ask one of your own if you are stuck on a math problem. Try the fun math games to practice your math skills. A handy Formula-to-go section has printable charts and formulas for algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Most people know about banks and how they work, but what about credit unions? A credit union is a not-for-profit financial cooperative whose members own it. Your funds are protected against loss just like a bank. This site has sections for elementary students, the Five-Spot Clubhouse, middle school, A.J.'s Mall, and C-Note University for secondary students. They have stories, games, tips for responsible spending and saving, a glossary, and information about the history of credit unions around the wrld. There are lots of fun things to do at this site as well as good financial advice."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Advanced high school math students will benefit from this set of graphics commonly used in Calculus classes. They require Java to view the animation of differentials, secants and tangents, number e, and the intersection of two cylinders. Being able to see these examples in motion will help many students grasp the concepts being taught in class. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Middle and high school puzzle lovers will spend hours at this site. There is always a current unsolved puzzle to try and many puzzles with answers in the archives. Answers often include what the answers are NOT, with a good explanation, which is often more enlightening than the actual answer. Teachers will enjoy trying the puzzles too and sharing them with their students. You may recognize some of these problems from your own math class! Java is required for parts of the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Have you thought about running your own business or inventing a new product? Many consumers are looking for more environmentally conscious products and companies. Green companies plan the production, packaging, and disposal of their products to be environmentally sound while insuring a profit. Green products are typically durable, non-toxic, made from recycled materials, or are minimally packaged compared to competitor products. This book is available in full text online with 40 case studies, planning advice, and almost 30 supporting charts and graphs. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Hamilton College Patriotism Poll is from a national survey of the high school graduating class of 2003. It surveyed attitudes toward patriotism, military service, and the pending war in Iraq. The survey of 1,001 high school seniors was conducted in March 2003. Since imminence of war was likely to inflate patriotic feelings, this report pays special attention to the differences between the attitudes expressed during the early polling sessions (on March 12 through 16) and the later (March 17-18) polling period. Included in the 11 key findings from the poll were that 2003 high school seniors are moderately patriotic by their own descriptions and that ethnic variation and political parties in patriotic feelings is marked. Other topics related to the draft, war protesters, and President Bush. Detailed results can be found in the appendix, which includes question wording and statistics. This file is in pdf format only. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"If you have ever heard your elders talk about ""old math"", they probably weren't talking about THIS version of old math. This site from Cornell University houses hundreds of scanned math books and other publications in multiple languages. Browse the collection by title or author, and you'll find books over a hundred years old in electronic form such as ""Philosophy And Fun Of Algebra"", ""Chance and luck"", and ""Euclid and his modern rivals"". Geometry, algebra, calculus, and other higher math students could find the original texts written on their topics. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Most of us don’t remember a time when there weren’t personal computers, but the first microcomputers were only recently developed, relatively speaking, in the 1970s. Beginning with carving notches into bones in 30,000 BC, this timeline of number and computer history covers major advances including the first place value number system, first use of zero and negative numbers, da Vinci’s mechanical calculator, and semiconductor transistors. Famous names in computer history are mentioned: Napier, Pascal, Boole, Babbage, Venn, Turing, Jobs, and Gates. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"In the Chronology section, select a time range to find out what developments were occurring in money and finance worldwide from ancient times to the present. Essays presented include Origins of Money and of Banking, Warfare, and Financial History, Money in North American History, and Third World Money and Debt in the Twentieth Century. Although the site is heave in text, it is rich in content. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"HOT represents Higher Order Thinking. Activities for middle and high school students are presented on topics including angles, symmetry, scale drawing, balance algebra, tables, combinations, statistics, probability, reasoning, finding rules and formulas, and problem solving."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"If you ever needed to know information about hat sizes, wind chill scale, paper sheet sizes in the US vs. the rest of the world, and Apgar scores, this is the place for you. This collection of units of measure incorporates metrics, English units, and international systems. The dictionary provides little know facts about units of measure such as winning a crew race by a canvas. Terms you’ve probably never heard of are defined here: snit, smoot, and smoz. Did you know that a jerk is a unit of change in acceleration sometimes used by engineers?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Imagine, $20.96 in the year 2003 has the same ""purchase power"" as $1.00 in the year 1776. Have you ever read an older novel or history book and wondered “how much would that cost in today’s money?” This site, Economic History Services, is sponsored by several universities. You can find the exchange rate between the United States dollar and European, Asian, and South American currencies, see five ways to compare the value of the US dollar from 1789 to 2003, and the Gross Domestic Product (the market value of all final goods and services produced within a country during a given time period) of the US and the UK for centuries. Other topics to investigate are inflation rates, the price of gold, the purchasing power of the US dollar and the British pound, and the cost of unskilled labor over hundreds of years. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"From the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Loughborough (Britain) University. Explore four-dimensional structures, projected into three-dimensional space. A hypercube is a 4 dimensional analogue of the cube. Details of the construction of this object are given, along with movies of a spinning hypercube. By inserting new vertices into the edges and faces of a hypercube, it may be ``inflated'' to give an approximation to the hypersphere. Requires some downloading of mpeg movies."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Each year immigration data are compiled and published in the Yearbook of Immigration Statistics (formerly titled Statistical Yearbook of the Immigration and Naturalization Service prior to the Fiscal Year 2002 edition). In addition to the annual report, there are monthly reports, supplemental tables, and other data regarding immigrants, naturalizations, non-immigrants (temporary visitors), refugees, asylum seekers, illegal immigrants, and parolees. A glossary clarifies what constitutes each of these definitions."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Tutorials in solving equations and inequalities, factoring, and graphing are provided. Choose a skill to practice and show a problem, try solving it on paper first and if hints are needed, you can request one and sometimes two hints before the answer is shown. The problems are generated at random so you can practice as many times as you like with unique problems. This site requires Java."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The activities allow you to ""see"" and ""feel"" some of the fundamental principles of geometry. There are more than thirty animations which can help you understand proofs and theorems, such as alternate angles, congruent triangles, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Each applet tells you what you are trying to prove in the activity, you can drag points in the figures to see how shapes and angles change, and there are hints about the proofs and how they work. All animations are in Java applets."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is brought to you by Alexander Bogomolny, a former math professor with the University of Iowa. Interactive Math offers visitors dozens of problems and puzzles organized by categories which include Arithmetic, Algebra, Probability, and Proofs. The site also includes a math poll, a ""did you know"" area with little-known information about math, and a rotating feature column."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is a series of interactive mathematics examples for high school students explaining ideas from algebra to calculus. It employs the LiveMath plug-in (free to download at the site) to allow interactivity with graphs, matrices, and calculus. The application of math to real life is also useful, relating graphing to economic trends, parabolas to bouncing balls and logarithms to the world population explosion."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Select the Celebrity Math Quiz, choose a grade and a math subject, hit submit and you are off! There really aren't celebrities here, but you can guess who they are supposed to be! You'll see math problems and have multiple choices for answers. If you make a mistake, don't worry because you'll get a hint and another chance to try again. A login is not required, even if you see a request to fill in a form or survey. Keep watching the little person in the top right corner for money bags as you answer correctly and unappealing bodily damage if you answer incorrectly. After each question, you can get an idea of how other students worldwide performed on that same questions. Perfect for middle schoolers!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The IRS's online 'zine for kids contains games related to starting a small business, the reasons we pay taxes, payroll deductions, and more. The site contains a special teachers' area and a tax glossary as well."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"It All Adds Up is a web site for high school students with five interactive modules which help students learn about credit management, buying a car, paying for college, budgeting, saving, and investing There are online games and simulations, which require Shockwave, that have fun ways to introduce new material and practice what you have learned. The lessons are linked to NCTM Standards. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Franklin Institute brings you the history of telling time with calendars, seasons, and sundials. Younger students learn about telling time and changing time (seasons) by doing a variety of activities. Older students learn how the Foucault Pendulum and the gears of a clock work. Click on the images of children to find each topic, lots of games and content!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

So you think you want to live in your own apartment when you graduate from school? Do you have any idea how much it is going to cost you to live on your own? This Reality Check will take you through a decision making process to find out what you want and then how much it will cost you to enjoy those choices. The Reality Check will let you know what kinds of jobs and education requirements are in the salary range for that lifestyle. It might be an eye opener!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Find state specific information or compare the 50 states in regard to health related topics such as health status, health coverage, Medicaid, Medicare, managed care, women’s health, minority health, and HIV/AIDS. Information is displayed as tables, rankings, graphs or color coded maps. These facts can be downloaded as delimited text files for students working with the data. The site is from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Other health related reports can be accessed from their main site http://www.kff.org/"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Young children can play these activities to practice sequencing numbers, addition, subtraction, shapes, and comparisons of objects. Click on the home button and then other grade levels to find other math activities for upper grades. Shockwave is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, tracking health information about children in the United States. Use the Online Databook 2002 for resources displayed in profiles, line graphs, rankings, and raw data in delimited files taht you can manipulate to crate your own graphs and charts. Child health issues include children who are not immunized, are not covered by medical insurance, and are living in a low income family. To use the rankings, select the time period to cover from 1990 to 1999, the state you are interested in, and the specific topic, such as teen birth rate and low birth weight rate."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A community college math instructor has created motivating games for this site. In the Math section, play the Number Monster! Pick an operation (add, subtract, multiply, or divide) and then choose a level (easy, medium, hard, harder, killer, monster). The easy section is good for younger students, but without using a calculator, some of the killer and monster problems will be a challenge for high school graduates! Check out more games in the section on Math Art & Games, and Geometry."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Select your grade from K to 6 and play the many games and practice activities to focus on a variety of skills. Activities to choose from include Brain Teasers, Extra Practice, eManipulatives (base 10 blocks, coins, number lines), a Data Place (to submit information on a survey compiled using other user submissions), a glossary, and games. There are some test preparation sections with suggestions like ruling out extra information. These examples walk you through the process and then give you a chance to practice each strategy. The site is free and isn't dependent upon the textbooks. Flash 7 is required for all activities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A banking and money site aimed at elementary students introduces you to the characters Penny, Dollar Bill, Interest Ray, Checks the Dog, the Professor, Mr. Money, and Mr. EFT (Electronic Funds Transfer). Use the special calculators to figure how long it will take to save for holidays, save for a car, or become a millionaire by saving money. There are ten quizzes in the game room to play. Java and non-Java versions are available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"KMODDL is a collection of mechanical models and related resources for teaching the principles of kinematics--the geometry of pure motion. It is a site with fascinating multimedia resources about kinematics and the history and theory of machines and how it relates to geometry. Click on the Tour to get an overview of what KMODDL can show you. There are so many cool animations, tutorials, and models to look at that you may find time slipping away without realizing it. The Tour requires Flash and the animations use QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Robert Lang has designed some of the most intricate origami compositions ever created. You wonÂ’t find a traditional origami crane in his gallery, but you will find a dancing crane, owl, hummingbird and many other birds. There are other amazing pieces from insects, mammals, mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, and dinosaurs to geometric shapes and tessellations. There are not directions, or diagrams, for you to follow, but check the incredible crease patterns on many of the pieces. What a cool way to learn some geometry concepts! An origami design glossary is provided.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What is the “secret code” used by the voyager spacecraft? Binary code, a series of the digits 0 and 1 in different sequences that translate into bits of information. As you pass your mouse over the photos of planets on this page, you’ll see the binary code that resulted in the photo. This type of system is really a series of “on” (1) and “off” (0) switches. The binary code is later translated into a hexadecimal (16) code, which most computers and spacecraft use. Try your hand at translating from binary to hex to decimal systems."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Looking for an introduction or refresher to number theory, probability, fractions, percent, decimals, integers, algebra I and II, geometry I and II? This site has explanations of the concepts and interactive practice for each. By looking into the teacher section, you can find out what level of difficulty each activity is from basic to advanced. That is also where you'll find the answer keys. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"There are many counting activities for young children in English and in Spanish. The images are animated and colorful, sure to appeal to young children. The activities include counting by ones, twos, threes, fives, and tens, finding the next shape in a pattern, deciding which is more in a set, and simple addition."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The University of St. Andrews in Scotland provides this searchable index of over 1,000 mathematical biographies, accessible by mathematician's name, historical period, or country of origin. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"These are not simple magic squares, there is something in here for advanced elementary and middle school math students as well as older puzzle lovers. There is even a bit of history scattered around the site, going back to magic squares from 2800 B.C. Ever heard the terms: pandiagonal, ultramagic, and bimagic? You’ll find out what those mean as well as learning about reflection and rotation in relation to these puzzles. You won’t find actual puzzles to solve, but create your own squares using the Construction tab at the top and remove some of the numbers and swap with a friend. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Making Mathematics is geared to encourage thinking for young mathematicians through interesting projects related to geometry, algebra, probability, number theory, and calculus. Each project key indicates what type of math is used and what level of experience is needed. Each project has some warm up problems, hints, resources, extension problems, and results with explanations of how each algorithm works. Teachers will find the handbook useful, which may be viewed in html or pdf format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interactive programs for middle and high school students to manipulate points, lines, and functions allow for animation that helps students grasp the meaning of mathematical ideas. Topics covered are Geometry 1 and 2, Trigonometry and Calculus. You must be able to download Java applets. The site is free although you can also purchase the license for the applets. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Computer History Museum presents a site about computer chess from 1945 to 1997. The site is supplemented with primary documents, images, oral histories, and video clips with transcripts. For decades, the goal was to create a computer program that would be able to defeat a champion player. In 1997, the program Deep Blue defeated Garry Kasparov, the first World Chess Champion to lose a match to a computer. In truth, he lost to a team of computer engineers and programmers who worked for years to create a program that used 256 processors that could examine 200 million possible moves, every second. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is designed for upper secondary school students and would be a useful supplement to high school math classes. Students can find topics with explanations, formulae, diagrams, and examples. It serves as a glossary, practice guide, and review tool."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Bureau of Labor Statistics hosts a site for elementary students about careers for kids who like math. Selected careers include accountant, cashier, architect, and mechanic, each describing what the jobs entail, pay, job outlook, preparing for the occupation, and similar jobs. Suggested resources for each job include professional associations and links to the main Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook. Access to the teacher guide on careers and educational resources from the Department of Labor is available at this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Find pre-packaged addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and fraction sheets for specific problems by grade level, currently first through fourth grades, or create a custom fact sheet, which allows you to input the minimum and maximum numbers as a range to generate the problems. There is a section for greater than/less than/equal to problems. You can also generate missing number problems. View answers online with mouseovers or print off worksheets and answer keys. An FAQ page assists with generating your own problem sets."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Mathematical Association of America introduces you to some men and women who use mathematics every day and others who rely on the general problem-solving skills acquired in their mathematics courses. You'll meet software engineers, an environmental mathematician, and a marine research associate, who helps determine quotas on commercial fishing to avoid exploitation."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Having trouble picturing probabilistic proofs, topology, wavelets, or relativity? Larry Gonick is a cartoonist for math, science, and history subjects that make the material both understandable and entertaining. There are 22 cartoons at this site from the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute that were first printed in Discovery Magazine. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"MATHCOUNTS is a nationwide coaching and competition program for middle school students. Students participate as ""mathletes"" in groups at school, then possibly in state and national competitions. Students can try the problem of the week or math challenge. Teachers will find coaching tips, a support forum, a quarterly newsletter, and can request the free school kit."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Middle and high school students will enjoy these fun facts about mathematics. Each fact has an introduction and then is explained with the math principle behind the fact. They are arranged by subject and level (easy to advanced) as well as being able to search by keyword. Subjects include algebra, calculus, geometry and several other higher level math topics. Using these facts would be a great way to start a math class to get students to think creatively and critically. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Provided by Montessori, these four math games (Stamp Game, Large Bead Frame, Checkerboard, Flat Bead Game) provide leveled practice in addition, subtraction, and multiplication. The Stamp Game, intended for 4-7 year olds, monitors the user's activity, offering help and instructions. Requires Shockwave."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Explore over 200 careers to see how math is used in those jobs, how much the average salary is, and what tasks are involved. You can search by job category or math topic, which can answer the question, “When am I ever going to need to use the quadratic equation in real life?” All engineers, medical fields, computer programming, forest conservation specialists use it, for example. The Lite Version is for elementary grade students and introduces math in the fields of health care, athletics, educators, firefighters, and vets."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Annenberg/CPB Project's Learner Online offers this rich Web site introducing students to the multiple applications of math in everyday life. The site includes information and hands-on activities related to cooking, finance, population growth, home decorating, and language. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Secondary students can see examples of how various areas of mathematics are applied to various areas of technology. Mathematical topics include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics. See how many of these topics intersect with chemistry, forestry, robotics, electronics, and various fields of engineering. Next time you wonder, “When will I ever use this math in real life?” here are some examples.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Play games to reinforce your math skills. Topics include algebra, shapes, ratio, times tables, fractals and puzzles. There are model examples to refer to and brief definitions or explanations for each topic."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This elementary school site highlights Dr. Howard Ufigure's Math Tutorials which cover data analysis, algebraic thinking (attributes and patterns), and probability. The data analysis section discusses range, mean, median, and mode. Other sections include space math and a geometry section providing activities on shapes, tangrams, word problems, and tessellations. You'll find word problem sheets for grades 3-5. The advanced math addresses equations, properties, and decimals. Don't miss Tales from the Dryer, fun activities about socks."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This Math League promotes student interest and confidence in mathematics. This section serves as a help resource for 4th through 8th grades. Topics include whole numbers and their basic properties, decimals, exponents, using data and statistics, fractions, geometry, ratio and proportion, percent and probability, integers, metric units and measurement, and introduction to algebra and positive and negative numbers. Each topic offers definitions and examples. This is a great site for review before tests or when you might need a new way of looking at a math topic."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What is meant by numeracy? Numeracy refers to the ability and skills required to understand and use numbers as a means of communication, or being math literate. Why does it matter if people are not math literate? Not knowing how to estimate or understand everyday money transactions can affect us personally and as a society. You’ll find helpful tricks for remembering basic math concepts like calculating tips, a conversion cheat sheet for weights and measures, and how numbers are used in the news. The site is also available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Students in an honors math class created mock interviews with two dozen mathematicians, living and long dead, talking about their early lives, careers, and discoveries. Each interview includes a bibliography, and most include images and formulae. This would be a great launch for students doing projects on mathematicians."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"These mathematicians are proud to assist students learn how to think about math. If you ask them a question, you won’t get a direct answer to the problem…that is up to you to figure out. Their goal is to guide students in using their own minds in figuring out a problem. Try the archives before submitting a question because it is possible your question has already been answered. Teachers can get good ideas for presenting new information or previous information in new ways. Elementary through high school math subjects are covered. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Elementary school students will have fun practicing their math skills at this game site. Word problems are in one, two, or three steps. If you provide an incorrect answer, you will be given some feedback on how to work out the problem, although some of the displayed coding in Grand Slam can be confusing. The help box has hints for words that indicate addition or subtraction to help you understand the problem better. Other math topics include figuring area and perimeter of rectangles, tangrams, and basic facts practice. The tangram and coloring games require Java.You might need to continue to click no to the Curser download in the Grand Slam game, you don't need it to play the games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This illustrated 460-word arithmetic and algebra dictionary provides definitions of terms in mathematical and regular English usage. With audio capabilities, you can hear the word spoken. Essays on related topics are linked from the dictionary entries. Some entries have questions and answers to sample problems. Some topics have lessons available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Hundreds of word problems are available at this site, for young students through middle school level. The format of these problem sheets is ideal for printing, with permissions granted for teachers to use in the classroom. The answers are also provided on answer sheets. The questions allow students to apply math to real world scenarios, popular stories for elementary age students, and encourage critical thinking skills. The organization of these word problems is especially easy to use for parents, teachers and students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Math Forum has created a section of the site funded by the National Science Digital Library with the goal to create a community digital library that supports the use and development of software for mathematics education. Teachers for preschool through high school can use the collected resources to find tools for teaching a variety of topics. Each annotation lists the specific topic, such as find slope, grade level, type of resource (tool, activity, lesson plan, story, support material) and technology (JavaScript, Java Applet, Flash, computer, TI calculator). Many resources come from respected sources such as Shodor and Virtual Manipulative, and teachers can rate each lesson if they wish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Elementary school students will enjoy these animated and narrated activities on estimation of length, place value and weight and capacity. Some of the more difficult lessons deal with line symmetry, patterns and tangrams. You can pause, play, go forward or backward on each lesson or let the animations run on their own. After a thorough overview and examples of a concept, like estimation of length, there is an estimation activity to practice what you have learned. Flash is required for the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"MathCats is full of fun activities for elementary and middle school students. Games include an interactive multiplication table and playing with tessellations. Find out EXACTLY how old you are, down to the second! The Attic has a magic blackboard, which provides answers to questions if you move the mouse over the blackboard. A bonus for teachers and parents in the MicroWorlds section is a description of what you'll find before you download the activity. A free MicroWorlds plug-in is required for the interactive activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is great for teachers looking for a book or story that might be useful for the students in their math class. You can browse by motif (aliens, female mathematicians, music, time travel), genre (fantasy, mystery, historical fiction), medium (comic books, novels, short stories), and by mathematical topic. Many author names will be new to you, but there are also many you’ll recognize like Borges, Asimov, Chaucer, Conan Doyle, and Heinlein. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"7 Stones Multimedia, a technology development company, has designed this Shockwave-enabled site to help students explore the connections between math and science. Modules include information on waves, orbits, half life, relativity, and more. You'll need high-end equipment (i.e., you really need the Shockwave to make full use of this site, and a speedy connection) and it's most appropriate for advanced students, but there's a lot here to explore. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Controversy surrounding the ""whole math"" teaching philosophy swirls at this site. Here, teachers and parents will find out about NCTM's national math standards as well as criticism of those standards and suggestions for revising them."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Math major and computer engineer Steve Kang brings you this clever set of 40 math ""trading cards"" styled after baseball cards. Each features a likeness of the mathematician, a list of his or her principal works, and a brief description of his or her contribution to mathematics. Unfortunately, they're not printer-friendly, but the information's valuable nonetheless."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"View the list of mathematicians in either chronological or alphabetical order, originally found in the book A Short Account of the History of Mathematics by W. W. Rouse Ball (4th Edition, 1908). There are figures and formulae but no flashy interactive pieces, but a great deal of historical information in each entry. This is a good starting point for students writing reports on mathematicians. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

April is Mathematics Awareness Month, sponsored by The American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The theme for 2007 is Mathematics and the Brain. Math plays a central role in modeling, analyzing, and understanding the underlying structure, function, and interaction of various regions of the brain. Over a dozen essays and a poster can be downloaded in PDF.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Cynthia Lanius has an outstanding collection of math related resources including this set of resources on mapmaking. Three major math topics associated with maps are scale, coordinates, and projection. She presents math problems and careers related to maps suited to middle and high school students. Be sure to browse the rest of Lanius's site hosted at the Rice University Mathematics Department. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Most people have played MadLibs, where you enter a random word based on a particular part of speech and then you read the whole story substituting the suggested words. A math lib is similar in that you create word problems using substituted words and numbers for these third and fourth grade level math stories. In addition, there are math lessons which could serve as a good review for up to sixth grade math and covers numbers, patterns, measurement, geometry, graphing and probability. Requires Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"One section of this site is a subscription service but the rest of MathMastery is free for parents, students, and teachers to use. Family Fun has a weekly activity for upper elementary and middle school students and their families. Cyberchallenge requires Flash, and offers timed quizzes on basic facts. DailyBrains has a challenging word problem to solve."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"MathMol is an introduction to the field of molecular modeling. Start with the Quick Tour to find out why math is important in molecular modeling. It relates to geometry and calculus. The online textbook is intended for middle and high school students. The site uses Java, QuickTime, and Flash for interactivities and demonstrations. CHIME is needed (can be downloaded for free) for the activity for two students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"These articles about math in everyday life are from Muse Magazine. There are over 60 to intrigue you, get you thinking, get you experimenting, and get you playing with math concepts. You’ll find a mnemonic device to help you remember the first digits of pi, math tricks with cards and dice, a whiz kid who found a way to fold a piece of paper a dozen times, and lots more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"There are games and review exercises at this site, which you can manipulate to figure out the classic map coloring problem, the algebraic functions of a number stair, and other activities. Practice measuring with a ruler and protractor, rotational symmetry, straight line graphs, pie charts and other review subjects in the “Revise” section. The Resources section has downloadable stationary (PDF format) of grid paper, dot paper, and number grids from 3x3 to 10x10. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interactive games and practice pages to print off are found at this site from the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation). You must have Shockwave to play the 12 games that cover Number, Algebra, Shape, Space & Measure, and Data Handling, but the 8 print offs are printable resources that explore the same math topics as the games, but do not require any technology. The teacher section describes the skills presented in each game and ties it to British math standards. Click on the other links for a math Desert Challenge and Bitesize for review of middle school math topics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Thesaurus.maths.org grew from the NRICH project at the University of Cambridge to develop an online dictionary of mathematics. The thesaurus contains over 4000 definitions and thousands of cross-references between concepts, creating more than a simple glossary. Included are terms, phrases, symbols, and proper names, such as median, “many to one”, M, and Mobius. Most grade levels will find useful information at this site, from elementary to advanced high school students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site has puzzles for junior (middle school) and senior (high school) students to ponder and work out. Published monthly during the academic year, the archives of the collection of problems dates back to 2000, so there are many problems to try out from previous years. Each month has new puzzles as well as solutions and extensions to the previous month’s problems. Older students will need to use trigonometry, algebraic skills and some aspects of proof when solving their problems. The advanced problems extend to an understanding of trigonometric and logarithmic identities, calculus and a comprehensive understanding of proof. The Recreational Mathematics section has problems on code breaking, tangrams, and other mathematical diversions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A high school math teacher hosts a site about math puzzles and frequently asked questions about geometry, numbers, constructions, and code breaking. You can search for different puzzles based on subject and difficulty level. Solutions to puzzles are available. A login is required for the Project Euler, a series of challenging problems that will require computer and programming skills to solve."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Mathsite from the Berkeley Math Circle has mathematical activities for people interested in math, and you might find that even if you don’t think you have an interest in math, maybe these online exhibits will change your mind. These activities are for seeing, hearing, and doing math. The Polygon Dissection Gallery has exhibits about Pythagorean dissection, central symmetry, polygons, proofs, and the impossibility theorem. Sorting Bricks and Sticks is a section related to comparisons, and using algorithms to develop systematic ways of sorting objects. The Math Lab has exhibits allowing you to design your own mathematical experiments using geometric orbits. Flash and Java are required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Worksheets and online activities let you practice your basic facts, fractions, sequencing, measurement, time, and rounding. Advanced math concepts allow you to try out statistics, pre-algebra and algebra. Preschools can practice counting. Two dozen games cover concepts of Roman Numerals, percentage, divisibility, and place value. The site requires Java.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Eric Weisstein's World of Mathematics (MathWorld) is compiled by Internet encyclopedist Eric W. Weisstein with assistance from the mathematics and Internet communities. One facet of this site is recreational mathematics, including cryptograms, dissection, folding, games, illusions, magic squares, number guessing, numerology, puzzles, and sports. These challenging activities are suitable for middle and high school students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Click on the Learning Zone to find math lessons for the middle grades. The interactive exercises give immediate feedback. Especially helpful are the explanations, step-by-step instructions, and examples of topics. The Math Extra section has a glossary and ""short cuts"" with tables, tests for divisibility, and formulae."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Take a look at astrolabes, tabulas, quadrants and the Aztec calendar at this online math museum. Many of the almost 50 artifacts have interactive activities which help demonstrate how the instrument is used or how it works. Some of the activities can be manipulated such as the orrery, a mechanical model of the solar system used to demonstrate the motions of the planets about the sun. To find the exact artifact you are looking for, use the map at http://www.mathsyear2000.org/museum/artefact.html Flash and Java are required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Maya math uses a base number of 20, which can take some practice understanding. Type in a number, even a large number, and the site gives you the Mayan equivalent. This site is ideal for elementary students studying number systems and ancient civilizations. Older students will enjoy the challenge of calculating in the base 20 system. You need a Java enhanced browser to get full capabilities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Megamaths is a BBC Schools Television series and this site lets children explore the times tables through games and activities. It can be used online and offline, there are printable worksheets, and a short glossary defines product, multiple, factor, equation, and a few other terms. Pick a number from 2 to 12 and choose the activity called Table Tournament to practice the multiplication table of that number. Each number also has a set of patterns and hints to remember the multiplication facts of the particular number. Flash is required for the activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you ever wonder what a million pennies would look like if they were stacked? Since the very first penny was minted in 1787, there have been approximately 300 billion pennies minted, with about 200 billion of them still in circulation. This site gives us a visualization of how large a cube or stack would be if you had a thousand, a million, a billion, a trillion, a quadrillion, a quintillion pennies. Don’t miss the bonus section on MegaMoo, stacking cows. By the way, a million pennies stacked would be just about a mile high."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Money Math, from the Bureau of Public Debt, is designed for middle school math classes. These four lessons use real-life personal finance examples to engage students in the curriculum. Need to convince students that financial literacy is important? How about having them figure out how much of the US household debt of almost $7 trillion is an average portion for every adult in the country, then maybe they’ll understand the need to control personal debt and manage their money. The 86-page book is a teacher's guide with lesson plans, activities, and is correlated to several state standards. It is only available online in PDF. An online slide show walks you through the program."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Have trouble saving money? Does it burn a hole in your pocket when you get your allowance? This site offers some suggestions for middle schoolers on saving and budgeting money. There is a money management spreadsheet for kids you can print off, a set of financial planning steps and other useful resources to help you plan your earning and spending habits. The teacher section has lesson plans based on NCTM standards. The Moneyopolis game requires a student login but also complies with COPPA online privacy requirements."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A high school math and physics teacher has created a site with descriptions and visualizations of functions, trigonometry, curves, and geometric topics. You will need VRML to view some of the animations. Spin the diagrams to get different vantage points. This site is great for visual learners who need to SEE how a formula works. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site from the Asheville (North Carolina) Art Museum explores how math and the visual arts connect related to pattern, symmetry, proportion, perspective, balance, perspective and geometric form. Eight activities focus on tiling, tangrams, and grids. Flash is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Built as an interactive multiplication grid to practice math facts, this site is an engaging online game where the player is a pilot flying a ship through space. Players can select which math facts to focus on, so if you are having trouble with your 6, 7, and 8 facts, you can choose to just practice those. You can play the game online from the site, you don’t need to purchase the software. Spend time reading the roles of play and try the practice session before starting the game. Requires Flash 6.0. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"If you know someone having trouble with remembering the times tables, this site is loaded with interactive games, teaching strategies, activities, and printable flash cards. Strategies include using music, pictures, and rhyming among other ideas. The student section has one area for leaning the basics and some tricks to memorizing basic multiplication facts. The other area houses the games, which require Shockwave and Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Did you ever crunch numbers? In the world of math, crunching numbers means you are performing calculations on big sets of numbers (datasets). There are games, quizzes, and fun facts related to education in the United States. You can find statistics about your own school and public library, which can be used to investigate differences among other schools and libraries. Look up where you used to live or where your cousin lives and make comparisons! The Create a Graph section allows you to create bar, line, area and pie chart and explains what kind of graph or chart to use for various purposes. In addition to definitions, the glossary includes WAV files to hear how the words are pronounced. This is a site for all grade levels, and provides understandable data sets for elementary students as well as secondary students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"In 2000, NAEP administered the latest mathematics assessment at grades 4, 8, and 12 to approximately 47,000 students in the nation. How did your state fare? State summaries give highlights and you can also investigate data specific to student, teacher, school, and community factors for the different grade levels taking the tests. Several sample questions from the tests are evaluated by student performance and samples of correct and incorrect responses are given. The data summary includes statistics related to achievement level, gender, ethnicity, region of the country, private or public classification, national school lunch program eligibility, urban or rural location, and Title I participation. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The High School Financial Planning Program from the National Endowment for Financial Education presents an interactive site about personal money management, budgeting, credit, and savings. All of the six units have content lessons, assignments, games, puzzles, supplementary materials, and are tied to national standards. A Spanish version of the student manual can be downloaded from the site. Flash is required to view the site. All documents are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This NSF project houses a growing library of interactive, web-based virtual manipulatives or concept tutorials, mostly in the form of Java applets. The emphasis is on K-8 for mathematics instruction. Students can manipulate a program to visualize a concept or relationship. The topics include number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability. The Virtual manipulatives are related to the NCTM standards for each age group. Each activity includes instructions, the related NCTM standard, and a detailed lesson plan."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Math Trail encourages teachers and students to discover and share math concepts that exist in their own environments. Students explore and create math problems that relate to their communities. Teachers submit the problems to the National Math Trail site, which are then indexed according to grade level and math topic and remain on the site for access by educators, students, and parents. Students learn about their communities and see math in every day settings."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Weather Service collects data on fatalities, injuries, and damage related to severe weather. Currently, data is available from 1995 to 2004, and displays data of male/female fatalities, state, and age group. Each has information about where the deaths occurred, such as in a flood, deaths occurred in a boat, camping, in water, in a vehicle, in a mobile home, and other locations. The summary data for each year includes the amount of property and crop damage from each weather event."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site examines a proportional geometry originating in the circle. Practiced in Native America for at least two thousand years, this is the same type of geometry discovered and developed by peoples from China to the Mediterranean Basin to the British Isles. The site is divided into foundations, anthropology, designs, and education and provides lessons, activities, teacher resources, and tests."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"With kids starting new summer jobs, this site from the National Consumers League give tips on what types of jobs to avoid for teens. Dangerous jobs can be due to equipment, hours, or processes. There are laws regulating what machinery minors may use and how late they may work at night. There are tips for teens when job searching and while on the job, such as trusting your instincts. If something someone asks you to do makes you feel unsafe or uncomfortable, don’t do it. Tips for parents are also helpful. Once you have a job, be sure to check out the Teens and Finances section so you use that hard earned money wisely."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"See the new color of money at this site from the US Mint as you explore the new $20 and $50 bills. Learn about the new security measures from the interactive bills which include watermarks, security threads, and color shifting ink. New design features include additional colors, small numbers to indicate the denomination, and enhanced portraits of the presidents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"While this site is to practice for the New York State Mathematics A Regents test, it is a great site to review for any high school math student. There are lessons, practice questions, and teacher resources for each topic. Categories are mathematical reasoning, numbers and numeration, algebra, geometry, measurement, probability, patterns and functions. There is a useful set of study strategies."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Advice for those who hate math and those who love it, this site serves as a sounding board, guide, and source of tips for all grade levels. There is a weekly math challenge too, but this site is more a support system for those who struggle with math and the adults who work with them, than a place to find math problems or puzzles. It provides encouragement, enticing stories, and invites you to see the joy and beauty in mathematics. It presents a side of math that most people never see and sometimes are reluctant to acknowledge. Yes, math can be tough, but it is also glorious."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"At the NOVA site, you'll read about Andrew Wiles, the mathematician who spent seven year's trying to prove Fermat's Last Theorem, and get to try your hand at a Shockwave demonstration of the Pythagorean Theorem."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The University of Cambridge provides math enrichment for primary through high school students with a variety of problems, puzzles, animations, and games. There are explorations with LOGO for all age groups. New articles and problems are posted monthly but you can also view back issues."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Lots of people enjoy watching shows about forensic science but there is a new show about math in solving crimes. The math used in each episode of NUMB3RS is based on real FBI cases. Each week there are new activities for middle and high school math students that deal with the mathematical concepts on that week’s show. Texas Instruments teamed with CBS and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), to create a section titled ""We All Use Math Every Day"". Teachers can register for the Teacher Kit and poster."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Cultures use many ways to describe number systems. Some use words like "two and two" to mean "four", while some cultures use the word "four". This site has almost 70 different languages represented, listed from most complex (Huli, from Papua New Guinea) to the most simple (Tongan, from Tonga). Each language is presented with the numeral, character, reading (if you said it aloud) and its actual meaning, such as sometimes 11 is described as "ten and one" or as "eleven".

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Online math games for primary school students help students practice their addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. Most games have several skill levels. A concept not commonly found with online games allows children to group ones into tens. Be sure to read directions to see how each game is played. The Scrambler puzzles take a bit of practice but you’ll get the hang of it and improve your time. Java and Flash are required for the games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"What do music, football, store discounts, heat index, grade point averages, bowling and pyramid schemes have to do with math? A textbook company has shared some everyday math at this site. You don't need the textbook to benefit from these activities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The British Broadcasting Corporation created a site for primary students learning number concepts. There are games, printable worksheets, songs, and animations with Addem, a snake who helps teach simple addition and subtraction concepts. The section for parents and teachers has activities to do at home, directions for playing the games, and lesson plans. You’ll need ShockWave to play the games and see the animations."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"You may be using a graphing calculator in class, but your parents probably used one found in this online museum of old calculators. Even the ones that only did the basics of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing were a major breakthrough for their time, and cost a small fortune. Notice the size of these things! The buttons, displays, circuit boards all seem so huge compared to what most people carry around in their backpacks."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Originating from the University of Mississippi, The Problem of the Week provides math problem solving contests in five categories for K-12 students. The site includes an archive of past problems, math resources, and contest rules. An unexpected extra is that Casio donates prizes for contest winners selected at random from a pool of successful problem solvers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"On Time explores the changing ways we have measured, used, and thought about time over the past 300 years. It accompanies a permanent exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History. Marking Time discusses almanacs, sundials, and moon phases. Mechanizing Time covers clocks, stopwatches, and the influence of the Industrial Revolution on time. Synchronizing Time brings us time zones and wristwatches. Saving Time presents efficiency studies of Lillian and Frank Gilbreth, of Cheaper By the Dozen fame. Expanding Time includes digital watches, atomic clocks and the time management craze. Requires Macromedia Flash 4. Check it out fast, the clock is ticking!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Online tutorials for finite mathematics and applied calculus are helpful as an introduction, a review, and at the time you are learning these specific topics in class. Topics include linear and non-linear functions, derivatives, linear programming, mathematics of finance, probability, statistics, Markov systems and game theory. You’ll find short descriptions of a concept, an opportunity to try out some exercises or a quiz on that concept. The authors have posted some math utilities for graphing, regression, finances, and other useful tools. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally, she needs help learning her order of operations. The tutorial is designed to help students practice solving problems using the proper order of operations: Parentheses, Exponents, Multiplication and Division, then Addition and Subtraction. There is an overview, a pretest and a tutorial to walk through practice questions. Incorrect answers are provided with helpful suggestions of how to correct the problem. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Origami geometry is presented by a math professor, but don’t let the idea of folding paper let you think this is a play activity. Advanced math is required for creating and understanding the complex octahedral, intersecting tetrahedral, and other models. Making these objects would be beneficial to comprehending some axioms of geometry, so this site would be useful to help students who may need concrete examples of complex ideas. Some of the constructions are difficult to create but they are also beautiful. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Knotology is the art of creating spheres from strips of paper. You’ll be able to make spheres and cylinders by creating squares or triangles out of folded strips of paper. This is much more intricate than the typical gum wrapper chain you may have made. Written instructions are supplemented with photos and some animations. Other links from this site are also folded paper creations, but not necessarily familiar origami shapes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Four students in Singapore created this site as part of the international ThinkQuest competition. Visitors to the site will find a glossary, step-by-step instruction in Pascal, and e-mail links to the students if there are further questions."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Annenberg Teacher’s Lab has a site about logic, number, and word patterns and how they relate to math. Each type of pattern has fun activities, multiple grade suggestions, and how they relate to NCTM standards. The activities let you try out the pattern recognition depending upon specific attributes. The valentine activity includes a list of suggested ways to approach the problem such as listing, making a grid, using a formula, and other methods used to solve pattern problems. Even older students will enjoy the challenge in some of these activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston provides an educational unit on the economics of pro sports for high school economics and social studies classes. There is an interactive baseball game simulation that gives you a chance to test your knowledge of economics and sports trivia. The Sports Page has background information for each inning of the game, so you’ll want to warm up with the nine innings sections before you play. The teachers guide contains activities and discussion questions organized by inning. You must have Java to play the game and a pdf reader for some teacher files."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This may look like your father's periodic table, but instead of Hydrogen, you'll find David Hilbert, who worked with invariants. Each ""element"" on this table stands for a mathematician, with a short biography, illustration or photo when possible. Intelligent as they may have all been, they weren't free from mundane problems like Cardano (Cd) having to use his mathematical skills to gamble to earn a living, and Weierstrass (W) spent his four years at university fencing and drinking. Although there isn't a way to search this table of math whizzes, you can amble around and browse, or when you roll over an element, check the name that shows up in the lower left corner, in the status bar of your browser. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Junior Achievement helps teens understand economics in life. This site tests your skills at financial planning by budgeting, saving and investing, learning about credit, and risk management. The Toolbox has a set of worksheets, a glossary, and a set of calculators. In addition to a regular calculator, there is one for needs vs. wants, student loans, savings bonds, and calculating Social Security benefits. The activity Money Might requires registration. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Money 101 consists of electronic lessons that help you invest, save, borrow and spend more wisely. Of special interest to teens are the sections about kids and money, saving for college, auto insurance, and controlling debt. There are 25 lessons, each beginning with top things to know about the topic. Many lessons have capabilities to make calculations related to the subject such as figuring out in today’s dollars how much your parents’ allowances when they were your age. Quizzes and a glossary are available for each lesson."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Phyllotaxis [Greek phyllo, leaf + taxis, arrangement] is the mathematical study of plant pattern formation. Think about the spirals on pinecones, sunflowers, and artichokes, did you know they form a Fibonacci sequence? Not only that, but when the patterns are in a Fibonacci sequence, the angle between successive elements is close to the Golden Angle, about 137.5 degree. There are cool applets, requiring Java, that allow you to explore and play with spiral and cylinder lattices. Visit the Smith College Virtual Exhibit for photos of microscopic spiral patterns in plants. The History section describes what different mathematicians have contributed to the field of plant patterns. This is a great site to visualize the math behind the patterns. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site is a semi-annual online math magazine for high school students focusing on mathematical reasoning and problem solving skills. You can learn about the history behind algebraic equations, see if you can get the humor in math in-jokes, try your hand at the math challenges, and meet people in math related careers. Archived issues can be accessed from the main site. Documents are in PDF format and download time can be lengthy. There is also the option to download the entire issue rather than article by article. Say, have you heard this one? A retired mathematician took up gardening and is now growing carrots with square roots. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The pioneers at this site didn’t go across the United States in covered wagons, they were the mathematicians who investigated binary theory, Boolean logic, and how ASCII and HTML work together. Featured mathematicians include Charles Babbage, George Boole, Augusta Ada Byron, (Countess of Lovelace), and Nicola Tesla. Each person’s section includes a short biography and photographs. The description of how binary numbers and Boolean logic work are clearly explained."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site, brought to you by InfoUse and NASA, provides teachers and students with a fun, interactive way to tie aeronautics engineering and math skills together. Intended for middle level students, the site engages kids in a series of activities in a game like format. Students learn about estimation, computation, geometry, spatial relations, fractions, and more. Teachers can register with students to win prizes. Some games require Shockwave, but overall the site is graphically pleasing, fun, and well worth a few class periods! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Choose either Amy or Cedric to be your guide through Moneyland, South Spending, the Republic of Savings, and Investor Islands. A site for kids in grades 4 through 8, they will learn about the value of money, setting a budget, understanding credit, and building savings goals for the future. To find specific topics covered in each ""continent"", use the Parents Corner to find key concepts. For example, under Investor Islands, students will be introduced to how investing works, risk, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, volatility, and diversification. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This ""Math for the people, by the people"" is an online encyclopedia being built by volunteers, who adopt a math term and provide explanations, formulae, and other useful information. Entries include cross references, bibliographic resources, and arrangement in a classification system. This is a site for students in higher math courses in high school, as there are over 3000 terms, and even the entry for ""least common multiple"" would take an advanced math student to understand the definition. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Platonic Realms site offers math humor, quotes, a Math Moment (detailed explanation of a concept), historical notes, and mathematical challenges every day. The PRIME Math Encyclopedia has almost a thousand entries, with two dozen extended articles on topics from Dandelin’s Spheres to Zeno’s Paradox of the Tortoise & Achilles. Don’t miss the mini-text on writing for math class, with ideas for implementing writing assignments in a math-class setting."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This is an amazing visual journey consisting of 42 images - 42 powers of ten. At one end of the journey is the immensity of the known universe, some 15 billion years old and 10 to 20 billion light years across. At the other end of the journey is a depiction of the three quarks within a proton. The image ""One Meter Square"" is in the middle of the continuum, and as you decrease to smaller powers of 10, you find pores in the skin, DNA, and a carbon nucleus. As you increase in powers of 10 from the central image, you move from Chicago to the Earth to the Solar System to clusters of galaxies. Note: This is a large, graphics-intensive site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"No matter what age student you are, there are lessons for everyone from primary grades through college, related to budgeting, spending, and saving money. Older student topics include credit card use, suggestions for avoiding or getting out of financial trouble, and living on your own. Each lesson has student materials, activities, and a quiz. There are helpful handouts for parents about how to talk about money issues with your children and lesson plans for teachers in pdf format. Teachers can search by state standards. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"PreK through 4th graders can play math games that will let them practice number recognition, patterns, money, time, ordinal numbers, geometry, fractions, spatial relations, and basic math facts. Games require Flash or Java. The directions are in text but the questions for some games are narrated. When an incorrect answer is given, the narrator helps the child and asks the question again. Click on the curriculum to find out which grade level and skills are for each game."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This one of a kind site provides background history on prime discoveries and how to find primes. Find lists of the largest primes, Fermat Divisors, and other collections based on a topic. A cool place to browse is the Curio section, where you’ll find interesting and little known facts about a huge collection of numbers. For example, pick 31 and find out that the speed limit in a Tennessee town is 31 miles per hour and that the sum of the digits of the 31st Fibonacci number is 31. The Prime Glossary defines terms most people haven’t ever heard of such as aliquot and repunit, amaze your friends with your primal knowledge!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site, designed by three high school students in Maryland for the ThinkQuest competition, provides basic, interactive information about probability through a PowerPoint presentation, lessons, a forum, an interactive poker game, and a ""probability calculator"" which helps students determine the likelihood of events occurring together. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Advanced math students will benefit from this online course on measure theory, lebesgue integration and probability. There are definitions, theorems, exercises and solutions students can use to practice or review. Not all the information is high level math, if you need biographical information on mathematicians such as Gauss and Descarte, you’ll find resources here. Some exercises and solutions are in pdf format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Problems ""with a Point"" are written for middle and high school students and build on previous math concepts and how the relate to new concepts. Take the guided tour of the site to learn how to make the best use of the content provided. There are many ways to search for problems and skills including by topics, Habits of Mind (problem-solving strategies), mathematics background, technology required, and keyword. Answers and solutions are provided, and many problems include hints. Printable versions are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Although this lighthearted site is designed for adult learners, younger students will also find much of interest. The information presented includes tips on relieving math anxiety, taking math tests, learning styles, the math teacher's ten commandments, and scores of math tutorials authored by students, for students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) established the Emmy Noether Lectures to honor women who have made fundamental and sustained contributions to the mathematical sciences. These profiles are short biographies of over 20 women mathematicians, describing their major works as well as their outside interests. Interesting personal details are mentioned, from escaping Nazi Germany to women making their way in the world of mathematics when it was a man's domain. On a lighter side, one woman noted that ""Maybe I became a mathematician because I was so crummy at housework."""

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The goals of Project Interactivate are the creation, collection, evaluation, and dissemination of java-based courseware for middle school mathematics explorations. The student section includes activities about number and operations, functions and algebra, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and probability. Each activity has information about what the activity is about, how to run the applet, and why the activity is useful. Lesson activities and a dictionary are useful additions. A Java-enabled browser is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

NASA honors the seven original Mercury astronauts with this commemorative site about Project Mercury. Take a virtual tour (requires Flash) of Glenn's tiny Friendship 7 capsule, can you imagine being in that small space, being the first person to orbit the Earth? Other features are short biographies of the astronauts, a photo gallery, and interviews with Sen. John Glenn, Scott Carpenter and Walter Schirra.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Oceanographic Partnership Program uses data from ocean drifting buoys to bring real life math skills to middle and high school students. Educational activities include tracking and charting a NOPP drifter. Click on Track a NOPP Drifter for detailed instructions of how to plot latitude and longitude, calculate speed of ocean currents, and averaging data. The plotting chart of the Atlantic Ocean, student activities and teacher keys can be downloaded in several formats. Much of the site is also available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Use the algebra modules to walk through more than fifty topics, including graphing, polynomials, slope, factoring, and word problems. Written by a university math instructor, the examples and illustrations are clear and concise. There are some homework guidelines that any math student will benefit from, no matter what level. Try the Math Study Skills Self-Survey to see how your own study skills rate. Once you complete the survey, a tabulation is posted with recommendations for study habits."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This online puzzle museum represents mechanical puzzles, or things you can put together, take apart, or do something with. Some of the classifications of puzzles include: interlocking, jigsaw, assembly, pattern, route finding, and sequential movement. Many of these puzzles are actual sculpture or other works of art. There aren’t puzzles for you to solve at this site, but look around the house and the classroom for puzzles to manipulate and figure out what classification they’d fall under as you try to solve them. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Security Agency employs some of the world's leading code makers and code breakers, many of whom are also talented computer scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and analysts. Codey is the owl that guides you through this site on codes and careers in math, computer science, and technology. There are puzzles to print off and figure out on three levels. Elementary level is for students in grades three through five. Intermediate level puzzles are geared for middle school students. Master puzzles are the most difficult and are designed to be challenging for high school, college students, and adults. Java is required for some of the puzzles. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This page is within a collection of essays on the influence of Pythagoras, and there is a cool applet that lets you move pieces of a square to prove to yourself that the Pythagorean Theorem works. This particular page guides students to discovering the theorem by a series of steps in the mathematical method (found in Activity 2). The steps proposed are to investigate, make a conjecture, and prove or refute your conjecture. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"QuickMath is an automated service for answering common math problems. Using a computer program, this site allows you to enter algebraic equations and inequalities to find factors, simplify, solve, plot and graph the results. You can choose a random expression to practice the skills for basic problems and advanced options. In addition to algebra functions, you can practice with differential and integral calculus problems and use matrices. Be sure to do your own work first before checking your answers here!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Radical math is math related to social justice issues in terms of political, social, and economic issues. Examples include poverty, juvenile justice, health care, and education funding. See the section on the Benefits and Pitfalls of Teaching Math from a Social Justice Perspective for some useful suggestions on why math related to social justice can be engaging and motivating, but also to be aware of making sure the lessons result in good math, not just a political statement. Dozens of math subjects are touched upon using books, charts, graphs, maps, and tables. Curriculum ideas range from single lesson plans to semester long units. Most of the internal lessons are Word and Excel documents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This 40 page document from the U.S. Department of Education and The Urban Institute describes how Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) for students in grades 4 and 8 and the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) for students at age 15 compare on math skills across 13 countries. U.S. mathematics scores rank 8th on TIMSS-4; 9th on TIMSS-8; and 9th on PISA. Topics include mathematics rigor, gender differences, content area, and instructional background. The study concludes with policy implications for consideration."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The BBC provides a good review of math for elementary and middle school students. The basic facts section covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, and percentages. Interpreting data is about using graphs, charts, and tables. Shape, space, and measure relates to time, mass, and capacity. There is a mental math and a game section for more practice. Each topic has an activity, fact sheet, test, and a printable worksheet for plenty of review and practice opportunities. Flash is required for some sections. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

We all pass road signs on our way to school, work, the store, to visit friends and family far away. The author of this site enjoys finding math problems based on road signs. One example he uses is a photo of a mileage sign with Town A 3 miles away, Town B is 33 miles away, and there are 99 miles to get to Town Z, creating a math problem of 3x33=99. You are invited to send in your own signs with accompanying math problems, simple or complex. The rules for problem creation are clear and must be adhered to. Many states and countries are already represented, but maybe you can be the first to submit a problem for where you live.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Do you ever wonder what the numbers at the end of movies stand for, 19-something or other? Brush up on your Roman Number recognition with this site which has a Roman numeral calculator, quiz, and date conversion in the Gregorian calendar (English and Latin), Julian calendar (English and Latin) and in the Roman style. It will also calculate what day of the week a specific date occurred, so if your parents can't remember what day of the week you were born on, find out here!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The US Mint is issuing new paper currency with a hint of color, but this site has thousands of multicolored bills on display. Check out the Banknote Anatomy 101 for information about watermarks, threads, inks, holograms, and fluorescent and ultraviolet properties of bank notes. Browse for your bills by continent or country and you will not only find current bills but historic bills. It is interesting to compare war time notes from countries like Germany to pre or post war time, including one bill from the Buchenwald concentration camp. There are bills from countries that you might not even know exist, such as Transdniestra and the Faeroe Islands. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Pick a job, earn a paycheck, plan a budget, and save for things you want. The reality of taxes and retirement greet you as you get your paycheck. Then you budget for necessities like food, rent, insurance, gas, and utilities. You also need to budget for fun things, savings, and emergencies. The interactivity makes you work for your money, and for six months of paychecks and a savings goal, you pay the monthly bills, and add to your savings. The final piece is a pie chart with details on how you spent your money over those months.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Sponsored by the Schools of California, this site offers dozens of lesson plans for teachers of math at all grade levels. Lessons cover algebra, geometry, discrete math, logic and language, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Concord Consortium, a non-profit educational research and development organization, hosts a site with interactive programs help secondary students understand key mathematical ideas especially related to algebra. The programs include a user’s guide and a warm up activity. Programs are: Qualitative Grapher, Piecewise Linear Grapher, Linear Transformer, Function Analyzer, Quadratic Transformer, System Solver, Proportioner, and Plop It! (from Shodor). These programs allow students to visualize abstract concepts and watch the changes created as students add new data. You can save an image you create (graph, equation, etc.) by clicking on the camera button and providing labels for your creation. Read through the user guides to understand how each one works. Java is required to run these programs. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Follow the dragon's instructions to set the clock to a certain time. Correct answers are given in English and in Welsh. (Flash Required)

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The CPB/Annenberg Math and Science Project brings you geometry and spatial sense. Interactive web activities are included for both space and shape. One game has you use taxicab geometry to find a hidden treasure in a grid. Another activity is about patterns on quilts, and a third activity addresses estimating length."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Science Museum of Minnesota has created some clusters of books, activities and experiments about various topics. This theme on shapes is geared to primary students and includes activities such as a shape walk, building pyramids and cubes, and using tangrams. There are also ties to science and language arts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"There are six sections to this sourcebook, supported by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics. 1. Characteristics of the criminal justice systems 2. Public attitudes toward crime and criminal justice-related topics 3. Nature and distribution of known offenses 4. Characteristics and distribution of persons arrested 5. Judicial processing of defendants 6. Persons under correctional supervision You can view or download entire sections, individual portions of a major section, and search the index or the tables. Anyone doing research on the justice system will probably find useful data in these tables. Files are in PDF and a spreadsheet in .wk1 format that you can save to Excel or another spreadsheet application to open. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A gold mine for bilingual students and teachers who work with Spanish speaking students in an English speaking classroom! The English term is written first, then the Spanish term with Spanish definition."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Speed! Acceleration, force, deceleration… all these phenomenon are related to speed. What are the mathematical relations that govern speed? What does math have to do with a NASCAR race other than miles per hour the driver can go? Speed doesn’t only involve rate but also a change in direction which could have deadly results in a race. Different sections of this site feature an interactivity, an experiment, notes for teachers, and a background story for events such as a car race, roller coaster rides, and everyday driving. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Statistical Briefing Book from Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention provides statistical information on juvenile offending, victimization of juveniles, and involvement of youth in the juvenile justice system. There are data sets related to violent juvenile offenders, student victimization at school, sexual activity, substance use, and FBI Arrest Statistics. Other resources at the site include juveniles as victims, as offenders, on probation, in corrections, and the juvenile justice system structure and process. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Mathematical Association of America brings you a court case where you are called upon as a math expert to help provide an alibi for an accused bank robber. The situation calls for applying calculus to real-world data, calculating if the robber had time to drive to the bank and then home given the traffic reports and other data provided by the lawyer's investigation."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Sudoku isn’t just for adults, young children can use their logic skills by beginning with smaller grids, beginning with a 4 X 4 and 6 X 6 before moving to a standard 9 X 9 grid. There is a “how-to” download in addition to the various puzzles, all in PDF."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Swarthmore University and The Textile Museum provide an excellent way to teach students about symmetry, tessellation, and other geometric concepts. The site includes a primer on different types of symmetry and pattern, a gallery of rug patterns, information on how oriental rugs are made, and student activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Developed by a university math professor, this site about symmetry is for high school students with a solid understanding of advanced math. Plane, cyclic, dihedral symmetry, mobius bands, tori, orbifolds, and paper dolls are highlighted. These paper dolls are not as simple as the kind you may have cut as a child! Proofs and theorems are provided for some patterns."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This is a basic introduction to tables and bar, column, circle, pie, and line graphs. It gives examples and short explanations of why each type of graph is used and has a short quiz to interpret the data displayed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The National Institute of Standards and Technology helps make sure that products are safe and high quality. Their kids page has fun activities like word searches, riddles, crossword puzzles, and hidden pictures. There are resources with metric measures which help put metric measures into everyday terms, a nifty metric pyramid to print off and construct, and helpful conversion tools. Why do we need a National Institute of Standards and Technology? Maybe this will give you an idea: In 1904 a terrible fire was blazing in Baltimore. Fire crews came from Washington DC and New York City, but most of their hoses would not fit on Baltimore hydrants. In 1905, NIST helped pick a national fire hose standard that was eventually adopted throughout the country. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Tangrams are ancient Chinese puzzles made from 7 geometric pieces which are put together to create many different shapes. Create your own set from the pattern on this site or try the folding version. There are many pictures to try including people, animals, and everyday objects. Try the special subset called ""convex"" where there are no indentations in the figures. Each puzzle also has a solution you can print or view."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Don’t know your stocks from your bonds? Your portfolio isn’t a collection of artwork at this site. Geared to investors under 30, there are useful articles related to investing. Be sure to check the articles on saving for college. The Young30 tracks 30 companies that affect the life of teens such as Disney, Texas Instruments, and McDonalds. Be aware that this site is for educational use and any investment you make in stock is at your own risk."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Want to be a millionaire? How can you make and save money? This teen section of the Motley Fool publication gives advice on these questions and other money matters. Most of the site is available for free, and you’ll need to ignore the advertising, because there is good information to be found. Be sure to have your parents look at the section addressed to them because amid the humor in the articles, your parents will learn something too. For kids interested in investing, there are resources on stocks for teens. From the main teen section, check out topics on the left navigation bar too, like the calculators, credit and debt, budgeting, car buying, and college savings."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"A Termesphere, named for artist Dick Termes, is a painting on a sphere which is an optical illusion, and “capture(s) the up, down and all around visual world from one revolving point in space.” These spheres are painted on the outside so it takes a six point perspective system create the illusion. Select the section about perspective to understand what one, two, three, four, five, and six point perspectives are. Check out the “Termespheres in Motion” for a QuickTime video of a Termesphere rotating 360 degrees. On the left navigation, click on the “Make your own Dodecahedron” to print and make your own St. Peter's Cathedral. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

The Credit Union National Association provides activities for parents and teachers of preschoolers to help them learn about how money works, how families use money, and modeling good money management. Eight activities can be downloaded in PDF for use at home or school. Some of the lessons relate to helping a young child understand saving, that when money is spent it is gone, and that gifts and fun activities don't necessarily require money. The site is also available in Spanish.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site presents the results of three studies conducted by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation. The studies examine the educational content of mathematically-oriented computer games and look for patterns in how boys and girls play each game. The site is easy to use and presents in-depth reviews of over 50 commercial software applications. Visitors can access information about different software programs by searching alphabetically, by age range, or by content strand. The site also includes a bibliography and list of links for those who want to learn more."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"From the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services site, you can find tidal predictions from all US coastline states. Data includes latitude, longitude, mean range, spring range, mean tide level and predictions of daily times and heights of tides for each day of the year. Use the button marked Observations for actual collected data to determine how close the predictions were. Advanced students can apply real life math skills to harmonic constants of tides."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This site from a faculty member at the Southern Polytechnic State University approaches tiles from a mathematical and historical point of view. Numerous cultures represented are Ancient Egyptians, Persians, Arabians, Chinese, through modern times. Each produced tiles with patterns and samples are presented grouped by culture and time period. Another way to display the patterns is by symmetry type, where multiple cultures and time periods are represented at once. A guide to identifying the 17 plane symmetry groups is given, noting lattices, rotations, reflections, glide reflections, and other special facts. Useful definitions help the novice understand the terminology. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Three high school seniors from Virginia, Georgia, and California designed this site for the 1998 ThinkQuest competition. The site includes beautiful graphics, an introduction to the concept of tessellation, use of tessellation in math, art, and science, a spotlight on Escher, and an exploration of the math behind tessellation. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This very cool tutorial blends hair style and geometric concepts of dilation, rotation, translation, and reflection. Become familiar with these terms as well as iteration, vector, and simulation as you go through the tutorial and then try out your own pattern by clicking on the Software section by setting your own parameters. Did you ever think geometry could be so beautiful? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"TranStats provides “one stop shopping” of over 100 databases for transportation data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. You can find data based on the mode of transportation: aviation, maritime, highway, transit, rail, pipeline, bike, and pedestrian. Special topics are safety, energy, environment, and passenger travel. A glossary helps understand acronyms and terms as they relate to transportation. The Mapping Center lets you view and analyze selected transportation data geographically. Charts and graphs display hard data in understandable images."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Stuck on your calculus? Try these tutorials on limits, continuity, and finding derivatives for some visual and audio help. The narrator, Mike Kelley, gives entertaining descriptions of how these mathematical functions work, using graphing and equations as he talks. Kelley has written several math books for the “Complete Idiot’s Guide” series on Algebra, Precalculus, and Calculus."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The American Navy wants you to help fight the U-Boat menace. Math skills come into play with this site about the submarine, U-505, as you hunt for this German sub during World War II. Using new technology from 1944, track the sub before it torpedoes your ship. Using radar, sonar, and radio signals, triangulate the position of the sub using the latitudes and longitudes deciphered by intelligence reports. Flash is required for the game."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Although this site is not the most visually pleasing or interactive, it does contain great information for parents and caregivers about fostering mathematical curiosity and skills. Adults will find dozens of activities they can try with kids at home, in the grocery store, or on the road. These would be great extensions of classroom lesson ideas! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

You want to buy a car. What should your annual salary be to afford the car you want? This problem-based learning site takes you through the process of finding out all the information you need to solve this problem. One point this site makes is that having enough money and affording a car are two different things. Debt to income ratio is presented. There is an interesting problem solving process detailed in the manual. The student manual is also available in PDF format.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"For people who need to visualize how a flat piece of paper can be folded into various shapes, this is a perfect site to explore. Folding a cube of six squares is fairly simple, but how about folding a dodecahedron, polyominoes, pentominoes, or a torus? Java is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The University of Toronto undergraduate mathematics site is designed to encourage high school students to actively participate in doing mathematics through a variety of mathematical resource materials, games, questions, and answers. Some fundamental topics in high school mathematics are discussed such as infinity, imaginary numbers, and math in everyday lives."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Differentials, slope, averagessounds like a high school math class, doesn't it? In this case, these words refer to the way scoring is done in golf. A handicap index is the USGA's service mark used to indicate a measurement of a player's potential ability on a course of standard playing difficulty. This site from the United States Golf Association explains the rules and reasons for handicapping. The Handicapping System handbook provides the formula for calculating a player's index. There is also information on how to measure different par holes on a golf course. There's more math to golf than just adding up the number of strokes it takes from tee off to getting the ball in the hole!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The Department of Veterans Affairs Veteran Data and Information Web Site provides social and economic information about veterans, demographical and geographical veteran information, and other statistical information by veteran program areas. Highlighted information is on veterans of the Korean War and on Asian/Pacific Islander veterans. Tables, charts, and bulleted lists display demographic data which can be used in math courses to create graphs, charts and other activities using the collected data. Some files are in Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, and Word format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"There are 58,226 names listed on the Memorial. Approximately 1300 of these listed are still missing (MIA’s, POW’s, and others). The first casualty was in 1957 and the final 18 were on May 15, 1975. You can search for veterans who died in the Vietnam War by birth date, today’s casualty listing, home town, or name. Entries provide detailed information about the veterans matching the search terms. The Wall will help you realize that these were young people who shared your hometown or your birthday and who had families and friends. Deaths by casualty type and armed service branch, pay grade, race, home state, and year are noted on charts. A special section highlights women who died during the conflict. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Advanced high school math students can make use of an online textbook about probability, statistics, and special models from the University of Alabama. The text provides the basic mathematical theory to introduce concepts, applets allow students to run experiments and generate data, and there are many data sets available from statistical studies. Special Models include geometric models, Bernoulli trials, and games of chance. Java is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Visual Calculus is a set of modules which are useful for introduction and review for high school students on the topics of Pre-Calculus, Limits and Continuity, Derivatives, Applications of Differentiation, Integration, Applications of Integration, and Sequences and Series. Some modules contain quizzes and drill problems. The site is created by a math professor at the University of Tennessee. Some modules demonstrate the calculus concept using graphing calculators. Java, Flash, and LiveMath plugins are required.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The purpose of visual fractions is to picture fractions on number lines and circles and to manipulate them using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. There are also exercises for identifying and comparing fractions, mixed fractions, and reducing fractions. Each section includes games with Grampy and Grammy to practice the concepts presented. Your computer must be Java enabled to run this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Interactive tutorials serve as an introduction or review for statistics students at this site from Claremont College. Some of the exercises are text based but some walk you through a statistics question, provide hints, and explanations if the incorrect answer is selected. Concepts covered include sampling distribution of means, Central Limit Theorem, and hypothesis testing using z-scores. Depending on the tutorial selected, Java, PDF, or rtf are required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

You've heard of Sudoku, but how about these puzzles? Akari, Fillomino, or Hitori? The Nikoli Magazine is a puzzle magazine from Japan that started the Sudoku craze. The site shows you the rules for these new puzzles, many of them with Flash tutorials, and a sample for you to try, provided with a solution. There are 16 different puzzles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Always looking for an interesting puzzle to solve? Try these math problems from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, grouped by grade levels elementary, middle, and high school. There are enough archived at these sites to provide weekly problems for over a year. The middle and high school problems also include solutions. There are also Monthly Challenge Problems for high school students. Direct links to archives are: http://www.nctm.org/middle/archive.asp http://www.nctm.org/high/archive.asp http://www.nctm.org/high/challenge/index.htm "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Wei qi, the Chinese name for the board game Go, is a complicated mathematical game that is said to be more challenging than chess. This ThinkQuest site offers the history of the game, a ""rules tutor"", expert advice, and an online game board to play on. Three students from China and Singapore have created a fun way to learn a new game that will stretch your analytical capabilities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"This award-winning site was created by math education students at the University of Richmond. The first section, ""Art & Math: How Are They Related?"" is written more for teachers than for students, but other sections of the site related to sports, grades, vacations, etc. speak directly to students in upper elementary, middle and even high school. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures the average level of prices of the goods and services typically consumed by an urban American family. The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis maintains this site enabling users to calculate the buying power of a dollar between 1913-1999. It also explains how the CPI is used to make the calculations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Folding a circle? This site from Bradford Hansen-Smith is about folding circles to understand geometry concepts by using paper plates, masking tape, and bobby pins. Use the “how to” section to begin by fold a circle in half to find the diameter, folding it in three diameters, making a sphere, and a tetrahedron. Check the gallery for stunning constructions like one using 64 paper plates to create an octahedral, formed into a hexagon benzene matrix. Buckminster Fuller also explored folding circles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Whose Counting is a monthly column on the ABCNews Web site written by mathematician John Allen Paulos. The subjects of the columns vary from current events, safety, health, puzzles, and how mathematics is related to them. One column, for example, looks at how math relates to the growing number of obese Americans. The column is written for an older audience, so some subject matter might not be suitable for students under high school age. The articles might be a good springboard for high school math classes to discuss how math fits into everyday life."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Faculty at the University of Oregon's Department of Mathematics bring you this site devoted to women in mathematics. Although much of the site is most relevant for higher education, the biography section provides hundreds of profiles of women from many eras and cultures who have contributed to the advancement of mathematics. The site incorporates biographies presented at other sites as well. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The problems are classified into grade level from Grade 5 to Grade 12 and can help you improve your problem solving skills. You can get helpful hints by following the hints link. Even high school graduates may be challenged with many of these problems; adults will find themselves sneaking a peek at the hints, too!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Statistics on almost 50 health indicators in 192 countries was published in 2005. The data, notes, and explanations are downloadable in PDF and Excel spreadsheet in English. Some content is available in French and Spanish. Categories of data include mortality (death), morbidity (disease), health service coverage, health systems, demographics and socio-economics, and behavioral and environmental risk factors."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Paper, metal, shells, plastic, it is all money to someone. Everyone who uses a particular form of money must agree on that value, and agree to respect that value. This site from the British Museum covers a range of topics from history to making to saving money. Several short “Explore a Coin” activities are found through the site where you click on an image to highlight a specific aspect. Maybe this site will interest you in becoming a numismatist, someone who studies money. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"AHA! Math lovers will enjoy this recreational math site full of palindromes, puzzles, primes and other curiosities. Some of the material is for advanced math students, people who understand what “Smoothly Undulating Palindromic Primes” are. Don’t worry if you don’t understand that just yet, you’ll also find introductory materials about palindromic numbers, numbers which are written the same backwards as forwards. A special feature is full of interesting facts using the palindrome year 2002. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"WLME activities from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics encourage students to work together creatively to solve challenging problems. Each annual event features a range of activities so that students at all grades can participate. Each of the 8 years focuses on a theme such as entertainment, animals, and nature. For example, the entertainment theme presented math aspects related to music, film, television, and print media. Bibliographies and resources are suggested for each theme. Resources can be downloaded in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"If you have ever thought about starting your own business, this site from the Brooklyn Public Library will give you some background and ideas to think about. The site covers running a business from getting started to marketing, financing, and taxes. Tools for financial record keeping, handy “to do” lists, how to write a business plan, and a start-up cost calculator are provided. You will want to try the quiz to see if you have the personal characteristics for running your own business, for many people, it is the most exciting way to earn a living. Success stories of others who started their businesses when they were young are found throughout the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Go to the site library to learn the basics of investing, some FAQs, and a dictionary. Armed with some background information, try the crosswords, puzzles, brain teasers, and the stock market game. Choose the Measure Up button to see how you compare to other kids in understanding money and investing. There is a section for parents and an archive of finance related questions and answers. The site requires Flash. If you use the college calculator, you'll need to download and unzip the program."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"The mission of YoungBiz is ""to empower youth with entrepreneurial, business, and financial skills through innovative education and real-world experience."" Young people looking to start their own business will find many useful articles, profiles of teen entrepreneurs, and financial tips. FamilyBiz gives parents ideas of how to help their teens become successful business people. There are two tours, one for students, one for teachers, which take you through steps like market research, writing a business plan, advertising and financing. Tours start at: http://www.youngbiz.com/biznet_tour/youngbizNet.html "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

Ever wonder what you'd weigh on Jupiter or Io? This site from The Exploratorium provides handy online conversions and a user-friendly explanation of the math involved.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math

"Consumer math and consumer education are emphasized at this site from the Zillions Online Magazine. Check the Weeklies for Money Q & A. There you will find a current question with suggested answers and an archive of past money topics including allowance, savings, and spending habits. Other features of the site are toy tests, an archive of articles, and Daze of our Lives, a comic strip about young consumer topics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Math