PBS Teachers™

PBS Teachers

Reading & Language Arts

recommended links archive

"From the Nettleton Intermediate School in Jonesboro, Arkansas. Made for kids, by kids. This ThinkQuest winning site assists with learning the Dewey Decimal System. Learn about the man, Melvil Dewey, who created the Dewey system for cataloging books. The site includes a pre-Dewey review to assist students distinguishing between fiction and non-fiction and some common library vocabulary. As the reader advances through the pages, the difficulty level increases."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Did you know Abigail Adams asked her husband to “remember the ladies” when writing the Declaration of Independence? It took 144 years for Abigail’s request to be granted. This Library of Congress collection relates to the campaign for woman suffrage, the right for women to vote. It provides 38 pictures, including portraits of key players in the movement, photos of suffrage parades, and cartoons. See the link to the LC Learning Page with Curriculum Connections to this online exhibit for ideas to promote critical and creative thinking skills related to the images."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site highlights American poets with biographies, selected poems, and photos. If you have RealAudio, you can also hear some of the poets reading their works. There are also historical and thematic exhibits including Poetry with Children, Poems of Grief, and Poets of the Harlem Renaissance. If you have questions about publishing your own poetry, there is a section with suggestions for you."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Feast on this site dedicated to the food of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Find information about medieval cooking, instructions for preparing authentic feasts, hundreds of recipes, image collections, and history resources. The recipes are adapted for modern kitchens and measurements. Some recipes have the original spelling along with the modern English. Chaucer students shouldn’t miss the article which includes recipes about food mentioned in the Canterbury Tales and his other writings. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Traditional tales from Scotland, Finland, Iceland, Italy, and Brittany are written in eight different languages, full of animation, sound effects, and some narration. Stories have special features which include background information, maps, dictionaries, photo galleries, and teacher guides. The reading level is geared to upper elementary and older students, and stories and illustrations are sometimes bizarre so this site is not recommended for young children."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Discover the role of books in the making of America. This site is in English and Spanish and has over 100 images of explorers, writers, and printers. Topics include the exchange of languages between Europeans and the people they encountered as explorers and missionaries voyaged to the Americas. You can also see where Columbus made annotations in his books! Navigation through the site can be through an outline or the gallery of images. After reading through the site, try the interactive quiz Cabeza De Vaca's American Journey."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site provides materials for Harvard University's Chaucer classes. It provides a wide range of Middle English texts and translations of analogues relevant to Chaucer's works, as well as selections from relevant works by earlier and later writers, critical articles from a variety of perspectives, graphics, and general information on life in the Middle Ages. The site concentrates on the Canterbury Tales. Especially interesting to high school students would be the Life and Manners and Science sections."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"An English professor has created a collection of literary terms and rhetorical devices that offer definitions and examples. You will find terms as common as 'allegory' and 'setting' and terms as uncommon as 'anadiplosis' or 'zeugma.' This site is a searchable database of the glossary, and is especially useful for high school students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"An interesting supplement to a classroom reading White Fang, “To Build a Fire”, or Call of the Wild would be to delve into London’s personal letters, final will, and other official documents. There are many images of the London family, friends, and places familiar to readers. For students needing information on writing a paper about Jack London, there are suggested resources and research aids. Teachers have contributed study guides, assignments, vocabulary lists, and quizzes about London’s writing for other teachers to use or adapt."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The American Museum of the Moving Image presents The Living Room Candidate: Presidential Campaign Commercials 1952-2004 an online exhibition of over 250 television commercials from every election year from 1952 to today. The site has a searchable database with commentary, historical background, election results, which can be searched by year or issue. Issues include Civil Rights, Corruption, Cost of Living, Taxes, War, and Welfare. ""The Desktop Candidate"" is section which features campaign materials made for the Web. The site requires Windows Media Player 9 or RealPlayer G2. There is an excellent site guide describing how to use and find the material housed here. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Martin Luther King, Jr. was the most dynamic civil rights leader in the 1950s and 1960s. His methods of nonviolent protest for social change exemplify civil disobedience. The King Papers Project’s principal mission is to publish a definitive fourteen-volume edition of King’s most significant correspondence, sermons, speeches, published writings, and unpublished manuscripts. Lesson plans are made available through the Liberation Community section. Each of the Project’s publications includes a table of contents where you will find many full text selections of speeches, letters, and sermons. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Haiku master Basho’s travel diary covers about fifteen hundred miles of his longest journey in 1689. Interspersed with haiku and images, the online diary can be read in four different English translations, or in the original Japanese. Discussion notes and images accompany each “station”. Basho’s writing uses his “idea of sabi, the concept that one attains perfect spiritual serenity by immersing oneself in the egoless, impersonal life of nature.” It looks as if Iris flowers had bloomed On my feet -- Sandals laced in blue. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The University of Mississippi presents this developing Internet resource about writers in, from, or associated with the state of Mississippi. Visitors can search or browse by author, title, place, year, or genre. The site also provides book news, an events calendar, writer news, literary landmarks, a Mississippi writer timeline, and more. The site has extensive author biographies and images."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The MLA Language Map uses data from the 2000 United States census to display the locations and numbers of speakers of thirty languages and seven groups of less commonly spoken languages in the United States. You can look at an area by zip code and counties, view bar graphs using the raw data. Make use of the online tour to get the most benefit from this fascinating site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site offers a detailed lesson plan for teachers of social studies, current events, and the language arts. Students will first reflect on what the deaths of John F. Kennedy Jr., Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and Lauren Bessette mean to them. They will compose and read poems that will express what their deaths mean to us as a nation. Finally, students will interview members of older generations about how this event impacts them. (Note: users must complete free registration for access.)"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Norton Topics Online collection of 16th Century literature presents information about the Renaissance, exploration, the world outside of Europe, and Christopher Marlowe. There is a review section including an online multiple choice quiz and summary. Writing samples from Shakespeare, John Skelton, Henry Howard Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sidney, and Edmund Spenser are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Tour the garden to meet the characters, create one of Jemima Puddle Duck's greeting cards, play online games in Tom Kitten's playground, learn about Beatrix Potter's life and art, and see video clips in Squirrel Nutkin's film show. Games include a web search, fun with shapes, coloring and dot to do pages, and the Vegetable Patch Game, where you see how many vegetables you can eat before Mr. McGregor catches you! Beatrix Potter's images are worth the wait for downloading. Choose English, French, Dutch, or Japanese."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Are you sure you know what plagiarism is? Claiming credit for another’s work can end a career. This lesson examines plagiarism and its legal and ethical issues. Learn about the importance of documentation and how to use quotes. Polish your note taking and paraphrasing skills. The site recommends four citation style manuals. Test you understanding with a concluding quiz. Requires Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Search the database of Pulitzer Prize winners since 1917. You can find winners and nominated finalists by year, category, name, publication, or citation. Learn about the background of the man and the prize. Check out the year you were born. Have you read anything that won that year? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press defends First Amendment rights of journalists who have been subpoenaed by the government to ask reporters to name confidential sources. The committee began in the 1970s to defend a reporter who was investigating the Black Panther movement. Later that decade, Richard Nixon tried to keep his presidential papers to himself and the committee stepped in. Topics on the site are useful for journalism student, such as rights to tape conversations, gag orders, access to terrorism proceedings, Freedom of Information Act (FOI Act), and other legal issues."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Who else but a teacher-librarian, or school librarian, would be the best person to put together a site with excellent resources and content about writing research papers, avoiding plagiarism, writing bibliographies, and presentation tips for public speaking. This is a site for students, teachers, and librarians to have on hand during the year when they need help getting started on a research project or a quick reminder on how to format an MLA or other style bibliography. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"There are over 16,000 public libraries in the United States. On September 11, 2004, people across the country will come together at public places like libraries to share readings, hold discussions, and present children’s programs. See if your local library is hosting a program, and if not, maybe you can help get one off the ground. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Haiku is a form of poetry from Japan, consisting of three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables each, and must have a special word which evokes the season. This site provides samples of many haiku, including some from the most famous haiku poet, Basho. Suggestions for writing your own haiku are helpful as is a list of terms related to nature that would be common in each season."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site contains the home pages for Henry D. Thoreau, and for three nonprofit organizations: the Walden Woods Project, the Thoreau Society, and the Thoreau Institute. The Thoreau Home Page provides material by, and information about, the American author Henry D. Thoreau (1817-1862). Long pieces of his writings are found at the site. Intriguing information about Thoreau from his contemporaries (Emerson, Alcott, Whitman, and many others) gives insight as to how others viewed him through letters, journals, and other writings. The links to the other organizations are under development, so be sure to thoroughly investigate the homepage, a ""must visit"" for students reading Thoreau."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Photographer Lisa Law portrays themes from the 1960s counterculture. Communal living, counterculture, Woodstock, music of social protest, and social activism are featured via photos. Images include the Beatles, Kingston Trio, psychedelic busses, Beat Generation poets, concerts, and anti-war rallies. A timeline is found under the “what else was happening” link. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"For three decades, your parents and teachers have wondered who Deep Throat was, and now we know. Two young reporters from the Washington Post spend months digging into the Watergate robbery in 1972 and eventually traced the break-in to then President Richard Nixon, resulting in his 1974 resignation. Woodward and Bernstein's notes from interviews, drafts of newspaper stories and books, memos, letters, tape recordings, research materials, and other Watergate papers are now owned by The University of Texas at Austin. Many primary documents are online related to the Washington Post articles and their two books, ""All the President's Men"" and ""The Final Days"". Journalism may never have been quite so exciting."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Developed by Greater Dayton Public Television, the Write Site was created to make the process of telling a story fun through a multimedia language arts curriculum. Specifically designed for middle schoolers, The Write Site allows students to take on the role of journalists—generating leads, gathering facts, and writing stories—using the tools and techniques of real-life journalists. Teachers can also download lesson descriptions, task cards, graphic organizers, and checklists for classroom activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Using the image of a pizza, the different slices of the writing process are explained: prewriting, draft, revise, edit, and publish. Each slice provides a short description, some examples, and a brief video to help explain the concept. Part of this Web tutorial also includes 6-Trait Writing, which involves Ideas, Voice, Organization, Word Choice, Sentence Fluency, and Conventions (grammar and punctuation). Teachers will find the rubrics provided could be useful to the classroom. QuickTime is required for video clips. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"You can investigate this online collection of 33 early textbooks for students in the 1800s. Page images and searchable text allow viewers to browse through our ancestors’ textbooks that are rare and often too fragile to handle. Try to find a book for your own grade level, such as the McGuffey’s Readers, primers in language, geography, history, and the human body, and compare them to your current textbooks. Maybe your schoolbooks aren’t so bad after all! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"21st Century Literacies refer to the skills related to information, media, multicultural, and visual literacies. Examples of lessons include the Function of Images in Text, Images as Persuasion, and Evaluating Websites. Each subject has a collection of lessons which are both online and offline based lessons, with materials, procedures, learning outcomes, and assessment. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"From an advertising collection available at Duke University, images and database information for over 7,000 advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955 are presented. Ad*Access concentrates on five main subject areas: Radio, Television, Transportation, Beauty and Hygiene, and World War II. Timelines given set the stage for the ad campaigns by noting events in US and International news, companies, inventions, the arts, and sports. Follow ad campaigns over the decades for companies such as Zenith and TWA (Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc.) The search function has a bonus of being able to search by special features such as language, children in illustrations, coupons, and testimonials. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Eat Hearty! SPAM ‘n’ Pancakes (1948) Do you think an ad like this would be created for today’s magazines? Journalism and advertising classes will find ads from 1940 through the present at this site. Part of the site is for members only, but you can look through the ads by year without a membership, making this a great resource for students studying specific decades, stereotyping, inventions, changes in cars over the years, and other trends. Check out the price of the 10 megabyte computer system (1982) and compare it to the most recent computer you purchased. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Designed for parents and educators of struggling adolescent readers and writers, AdLit.org offers articles that provide research-based and best-practice information about adolescent literacy, content area literacy instruction, reading comprehension, motivation, and intervention. Classroom strategies for before, during, and after comprehension instruction and an extensive glossary are provided. There are some videos of authors and of teachers focusing on a skill such as creating “juicy” vs. “dry” questions before reading. Videos require Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"African American Women Writers of the 19th Century is a digital collection of over 50 published works by more than 30 19th Century black women writers. Familiar names such as Phyllis Wheatley, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet A. Jacobs stand out, but read through the short biographies of each woman, there are many who continued to write in the face of poverty and hardship. Many became teachers and ministers after Emancipation. Until recent decades, most African American women writers were unfamiliar to students and scholars. This site from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture reintroduces these women to us. There are works of fiction, biography and autobiography, essays, and poetry. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This rich collection of primary source material from the Library of Congress incorporates documents, audio, video, maps, and photographs into forty online exhibitions. Here you'll find information on everything from the Civil War to vaudeville to folk music to the Great Depression. This is an unbelievable resource for secondary level literature and social studies classes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Michigan State University hosts a glossary of thousands of American Sign Language terms with QuickTime animations and descriptions of how the words are formed. For example, Ladybug is created when the signs “lady” and “insect” are combined. “Learn” is created by the movement of the hand showing knowledge being taken from a book and placed in the brain."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The American Verse Project assembles and archives electronic versions of American poetry prior to 1920. This collaboration between the University of Michigan Humanities Text Initiative (HTI) and the University of Michigan Press makes available the poetry of many, many authors whose works are no longer in print and whose poetry would otherwise be too expensive to use. The site is especially rich with minor poets, though works by Dickinson, Emerson, and other well-known poets can also be found."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Dewey to the Rescue! If you have ever wondered how the books got organized the way they are in the library, this tour should give you a good idea of how hierarchical classification works and why organization is important to making sense of things. This site is for middle school or older students, it isn't a primer on what books you'll find in the 600s. The DDC is the most widely used library classification system, even more commonly found that the Library of Congress classification system. Flash 7 is required for the tour."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"An elementary school team for ThinkQuest Junior has put together a set of resources that is easily understood by most students about copyrights, trademarks, and licenses. There is a Webmasters' Advice Page, Counterfeit Information, an interview with librarians at the National Digital Library at the Library of Congress, and a Class Activities Page. This is information every student should understand in a digital environment in which it is easy to copy and paste material. Be sure you know how to give credit to others where necessary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Webmaster Mark Harden has collected an impressive group of Web sites and book suggestions on artists and schools of art including Impressionism, Cubism, Photography, and Abstract Expressionism. The Artchive includes both public domain and copyrighted works of art and you can search by artist or by style. Take a landscape tour or begin with the favorites tour. This is a great place to start for those who may be unfamiliar with art history."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Arthur Miller's success as a playwright began as a student at the University of Michigan in the 1930s. This site by students at the University of Michigan has summaries and analyses of plays including The Crucible and Death of a Salesman. The timeline highlights events in Miller's life along with events in U.S. and world history, for example, in 1932 when Miller graduated from high school, Hitler assumes power in Germany. The text of two interviews with Miller are also available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If you ever thought no one “cool” had to read some classic literature like you are being assigned to in school, think again. This site presents Songs Inspired by Literature, over two hundred songs and the works of literature they refer to. Who would have thought Led Zepplin would have a song based on Moby Dick? There are sample lesson plans for high school and adult learners based on Angela’s Ashes and Grapes of Wrath. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"African American playwright August Wilson wrote a cycle of ten plays about the African-American experience in the 20th century including “Fences,” “Jitney,” “Seven Guitars,” and his last, “Radio Golf”. This site from the New York Times presents an audio slide show, photos, and theater reviews. To read articles and reviews, you need to login (free)."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"As many parents know, back to school time sometimes can be considered the most wonderful time of the year. To accompany this gleeful outlook on the beginning of a new school year, browse through the collection of editorial cartoons on the topic. Many are downright funny and some are quite pointed. Themes include childhood obesity, class size, heavy backpacks, and standardized testing. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Follow Big Dog through this grammar site for older students, as he sniffs out dangling modifiers, parallel structures, comma splices, active and passive constructions, and many other grammar topics that often trip writers. There is a quick guide to the MLA guidelines for proper citations and how to avoid plagiarism. Try the self-tests that quiz you on the topics. This is an entertaining method of presenting some difficult grammar rules in a clear manner."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Black Arts Movement (BAM) spans the period from the mid 1960's to the mid 1970's. Authors represented at this site include Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Nikki Giovanni, and Sonia Sanchez. Some of the key concepts of this movement are Black Power, cultural nationalism, and black aesthetic. The role of women in the movement is also featured. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This resource for elementary and middle school ESL and EFL educators offers a variety of worksheets, games, flashcards, bulletin boards, and more. (Some ad banners on page.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"A guide to children's books for kids through 12 years old provided by the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County in North Carolina, this site has hundreds of book reviews in different reading levels and interest areas. Users can search for books by author, title, reading level, interest area, number of pages, and illustrator. Parents can find special notes attached to some reviews providing additional information about the book."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Screen Actor’s Guild Foundation brings us an on-line streaming video program featuring SAG members reading children’s books aloud. Watch and listen to Elijah Wood read “Me and My Cat” by Satoshi Kitamura. In all, ten books by authors like Patricia Polacco, Mem Fox, and David Shannon are read by actors including Sean Astin and Melissa Gilbert. Each book offers an accompanying lesson plan and activity guide as well as information about the author, illustrator and reader. Downloads require Real Audio, Windows Media or QuickTime "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

BookTV on C-SPAN2 highlights nonfiction books every weekend, and you can find out more about the authors and their books at this companion web site. Check archives for past features, with short descriptions and videos of episodes, which require Real Player. Browse over 800 Booknotes, hour-long interviews with transcripts from the show archives between 1989-2004, on 15 topics ranging from world leaders and public policy to science and technology. In Depth features are three hour videos of a single author including Barbara Ehrenreich, Edward O. Wilson, and Jimmy Carter.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Bookwink is for kids in grades 3-8 that provides podcasts and web videos, to connect them to books. Videos are 3 minute booktalks, updated monthly, on topics like popularity, parallel universes, sharks, and World War II. Browsing the site under subject area will provide additional read-alikes. You can look for books by subject, grade level, author or title. Videos require QuickTime.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site, which provides the complete text of Thomas Bulfinch's The Age of Fable, The Age of Chivalry, and Legends of Charlemagne, is maintained by Bob Fisher. The text of each of Bulfinch's studies is linked to explanatory notes. Also included is a biography of Bulfinch, a list of cited poets and poetry, and brief descriptions of recommended editions of books."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"CNN and Turner Learning provide high school and college journalism students an opportunity to publish Web and video work. Find articles written by students who publish the news from their perspective. The goal of CNNSB is to create the standard by which future reporters and production staff create and view news. To write for CNNSB, you need to be an approved CNNSB school, but anyone can read the news written by and for students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site provides reviews of over 200 children's books. The site also contains discussion topics, activities, and related titles for many of the books included in the site. Users can search by author, title, subject, grade level (K-9), or type of book. In-depth analysis of particular curricular topics and professional development tools are also available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Curious George is the mascot for the new American Library Association Story Hour Program. The site from Houghton Mifflin provides numerous downloadable images, book lists, 100th Day of School activities, a teacher’s guide, a party kit, and many other activities for preschool and primary school students. Most are in pdf format. What many readers of Curious George books may not know is that in 1940 the authors H.A. and Margret Rey, both German Jews, escaped from Paris on bicycles just hours before the Nazis invaded."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Dr. Isabel Schon, Director of the Center for the Study of Books in Spanish for Children and Adolescents, presents information about recommended books in Spanish that are published around the world. The selection criteria for the books was based on their quality of art and writing, presentation of material, and appeal to the intended audience. Also included is a weekly update for recently published books. All information on this site is provided in both English and Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"What do Abrahan Lincoln, Winston Churchill, and Handel have in common? They all had bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depression) is a serious but treateable medical illness. It is a disorder of the brain marked by extreme changes in mood, energy and behavior. Many artists, writers, musicians, inventors, political and business leaders and other creative people had or have bipolar disorder. Often the high moods are times of great creativity. This gallery displays art works and literature writeen by children and adolescents with Bipolar Disorder."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The Library of Congress Rare Book & Special Collections Reading Room hosts 50 early children's books by authors representing include Randolph Caldecott, L. Frank Baum, and Robert Louis Stevenson. Illustrators include Kate Greenaway, W. W. Denslow, and Maxfield Parrish. Use the page turner to view page by page, or download large PDF versions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"What a fun site for Van Allsburg fans! His illustrations are distinctive and imaginative, and this website brings some of the books to life through games, online coloring, ten video clips, and an interactive timeline of his books. Did you know he is also a sculptor and designs posters? Each book title has a synopsis, teacher resources, a kids corner with a prompt for children to think about while reading the book and examining the illustrations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Available in English and Spanish, Colorín Colorado is a special initiative from Reading Rockets, www.readingrockets.org, a national project of public television station WETA in Washington, D.C. This bilingual Web site was created mostly for parents to help their children become good readers and successful students. There are tips and activities for reading practice at home. Recommended books are either bilingual, in Spanish, or about Hispanic characters. There is a video interview with Hispanic author Pat Mora that can be viewed at the site. The section for teachers provides ideas on ways to use the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Select from 18 political cartoonists to get an indication of important stories in the news. You can choose specific dates during the past few weeks for each cartoonist. It is interesting to see how different artists treat the same topic.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Intended for elementary students, this simple page provides eleven questions and answers to copyright issues for students in terms that are understandable. Topics include fair use, public domain, attribution, and use of photos, songs and video clips. Copyright is an issue elementary students need to learn about and adhere to proper use of materials. Don't postpone the issue until secondary school! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Cultural History Timeline from the BBC takes you on a journey through time to experience some of the greatest works, famous names and movements associated with a thousand years of western arts. Learn about famous artists and great works from the 11th to the 20th century across four distinct genres: Visual Arts, Architecture, Music and Literature. Each century has an entry for each genre and highlight pieces such as the Bayeux Tapestry, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and the Alhambra. Artists include Rubens, Velazquez, and Frank Lloyd Wright. Musicians highlighted are Carmina Burana, William Byrd, and Bela Bartok. Literature selections range from Beowulf to Virginia Wolff. Spend time browsing, there are many selections to learn from."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Storytelling is a vital part of the cultural identity of most people. This site has a collection of stories from Aboriginal peoples of Canada which teach lessons, give warnings, entertain, and relate history. The stories are from the First Nations, Mtis and Inuit peoples of Canada. Some are about the creation of the earth, healing, spirituality, family, and some relate the loss of their culture in the modern world. The stories are in MP3 format and the transcript accompanies the audio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Co-published with Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, CyberSmart has created a free curriculum for K-8 students of NETS standards based lesson plans, activity sheets, posters and information for parents. The topics include: Safety, Manners, Advertising, Research, and Technology Practices. There is a Flash audio introduction to each topic for teachers and parents, ranging from two to almost eight minutes. Activity sheets are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Political and editorial cartoonists represent varying opinions on current events, making for fascinating studies of art and culture. This site categorizes cartoons by topic so you can compare how cartoonists treat the same topic. Given the charged nature of many cartoons, some are bound to make you laugh and some will make you angry. It is interesting to see how international newspaper editorial cartoonists view the same issues. The Teacher’s Guide provides lesson plans and games for all grade ranges, which engage students as they explore and interpret the symbolism in cartoons."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"What do you call a carbonated beverage? Soda? Tonic? Pop? Check out these maps and where people use specific terms, and you’ll generally find terms we use are regional. When you bring home food from the grocery store, is it in a bag, a sack, or a poke? We are all Americans, but we have different words and pronunciations for the same things. What sounds odd to your ear, is perfectly at home in another part of the country. You say sub, she says grinder, I say hoagie. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Browse the Digital Articles about how Emily Dickinson wrote, but also an intriguing article titled: ""Mutilations: What Was Erased, Inked Over, and Cut Away"". Sometimes finding out what was removed is more interesting than a complete text. There is also some humor to be found in Emily's Cartoons. ""Titanic Operas"" is a collection of text and audio clips of poets at a 1986 conference to mark the centenary of Emily Dickinson's death. Included are Gwendolyn Brooks and Mary Oliver, among two dozen poets. Most documents provide an image of the actual letter or poem, transcription, and notes. Audio requires RealPlayer. Some sections of the site are restricted access."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The University of Central Florida promotes the concept of using video trailers to introduce potential readers to books, as if they were a movie preview, but for a book instead. Browse through over 40 books in the collection for a brief summary and QuickTime video. Try out UB the Director, where you can create your own book trailer. You’ll find scripting ideas, storyboards, and a "how to" section.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This comprehensive Web site devoted to the study of Dante includes a variety of resources. There is online version of The Divine Comedy (in Dante's Italian and in translation), scholarly criticism, student essays, and a classroom section with a study guide, project ideas, and lesson plans."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Stanford University re-released a collection of Arthur Conan Doyle's tales of Sherlock Holmes, just as they were originally printed and illustrated in The Strand Magazine. Download PDF versions of A Scandal in Bohemia, The Speckled Band, The Hound of the Baskervilles, and The Final Problem, in which Holmes and Moriarty seem to plunge into Reichenbach Falls. Notes on the story accompany the original version. Biographical information about Arthur Conan Doyle and background and illustrations of Victorian London are other features in the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

This project from various libraries and museums in North Carolina brings together local history materials, historical fiction related to these localities, and zoomable museum artifacts, photographs, maps, and streaming video. Each entry provides an abstract of the story, short biography of the author, images of actual pages and the text upon them. If you want to search the text, choose the BookViewer version. Whether you browse by title or author, each entry will note if there is a classroom resource available. Resources for teachers include lesson plans for K-12 and can be browsed by subject area (visual arts, English, information skills) and theme (writing skills, problem solving skills, fiction).

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The 1918 classic rule book for usage, composition and style by William Strunk, Jr. is available online for browsing by chapter or searching the text. English teachers have been using this book for decades to guide their students in a clear, concise writing style. Strunk tells you where to put commas and parentheses, how to use the active voice, and how to omit needless words. Included are words and expressions commonly misused and misspelled.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"For those who enjoy acting in or reading works by English writers, this collection of accents and dialects will give you rich examples of how people speak in different parts of England. Some of these speakers must have sounded like the Yorkshire farmers James Herriot listened to as he tended their livestock. Each recording provides a lexis (vocabulary), phonology, and grammar to help explain what terms mean and what the speaker is saying in more common usage. You’ll get an insight to the lives of rural farmers, miners, and other trades that are becoming lost to modern times. Requires Windows Media Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If you have thought about trying out for a play or enjoy theatre, check this site from ArtsAlive in Canada. Budding playwrights will find ideas on honing their skills and you’ll meet actors, directors, and playwrights through interviews online. There are some activities for pairs involving improvisation, activities about Shakespearean drama, and teacher guides for over a dozen plays. If design and production are your interest, you’ll find sections about props, set design, costume, lighting, sound, and stage management. Have you ever exited from a vomitory? No, it isn’t what you think, check the glossary in the Info Zone and see what it really is. Much of the site is also available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Meet Eric Carle, prolific picture book artist, a long time favorite illustrator. In addition to a short biography, the FAQ section answers questions that curious students have asked over the years, such as how the publishers create the web in The Very Busy Spider, the cricket sound in A Very Quiet Cricket, and the light in The Very Lonely Firefly (thermography and computer chips). He also addresses why the butterfly in The Very Hungry Caterpillar comes from a cocoon, not a chrysalis. The bulletin board provides ideas from teachers on how to use specific Carle books in the classroom. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"ARTSEDGE presents a site for secondary students about Don Quixote. The major sections are Spain during Cervantes' time, lesson ideas, and connections to performing, visual, and literary arts. Cervantes' Spain includes information about The Golden Age of Spain, a timeline, and biographical information about Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. Did you know he died the same day as Shakespeare? The lessons are detailed and are related to National Standards for Arts Education. To access all portions of the site, you need Adobe Acrobat, Shockwave, QuickTime, and RealPlayer"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This NCTE-sponsored companion site to Masterpiece Theater's American Collection television series provides background information and teaching resources for high school literature teachers and students. James Agee, Langston Hughes, Henry Adams, Willa Cather, Eudora Welty, and Esmerelda Santiago are the featured authors on the site. For each author, you will find biographical essays, recommended links, online texts, lesson plans, and more."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania hosts a site about the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political campaigners in TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews, and news releases. They check into statements made by candidates Kerry and Bush and point out the half-truths, twisted statements and complete inaccuracies. This is a great resource not only for voters but for people interested in journalism and media studies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Fallacies are types of mistaken reasoning, and Aristotle described them in two ways: linguistic or non-linguistic, or those which do or do not depend on language. This collection of fallacies can be browsed alphabetically (abstraction to wishful thinking) or by type in the taxonomy, where you’ll find subfallacies within major headings. An example is a type of Informal Fallacy, subtype Red Herring, subtype Emotional Appeal, down to Wishful Thinking. Each one provides the form, examples, expositions, exposure and sources. If Logic has you confused, this site should help clarify how each fallacy functions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Numerous Japanese American and Japanese Canadian internment camp residents and professional photographers display photos of their time in the camps during the 1940s. Although cameras were considered contraband, there were many people who took photos of the relocation camps, including the fences built to keep them in. Camps represented are Manzanar, Topaz, Gila River, and Heart Mountain. Most photos are of families, friends, and camp events. Ironically, even though most cameras were confiscated, internees were able to mail out their film to be developed and would have the prints returned to the camps! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky has traveled across the country recording more than 1,000 Americans reciting their favorite poems. Visit the site to access audio and video of the readings, to learn about Pinsky's purpose and journey, and to read interesting statistical information about just who's reading poetry these days. A list of the 25 most-selected poems is included as well."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The National Library of Medicine presents Mary Shelley's Frankenstein via the issues of eugenics, interspecies organ transplants, genetic engineering, and cloning. This site presents the Frankenstein story in the original novel form and film versions. Shelley's novel written almost 200 years ago touches on ethical topics we still debate today about what we consider ""acceptable"" science? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site is maintained by Greg Freeman, a former principal, teacher, presenter and trainer and provides guidance is using different types of graphic organizers: webs, concept maps, matrices, flow charts for different purposes: describing, comparing, contrasting, classifying, sequencing, causal, and decision making. The site also includes news and reviews about related books and software."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"More than a dozen examples of graphic organizers in a student activity bank are provided by the California SCORE site. Each type of organizer has a short description and a diagram which can be used for practice. Especially helpful are some key questions that can be used as examples for each type of diagram, for example, a continuum organizer is best used for something that is being scaled and has endpoints as extremes. Graphic organizers on this site include Venn diagrams, chain of events, spider map, and cycles."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Step into the world of the Brothers Grimm, but beware of the dangers that lurk in the woods! The tales the brothers collected in Germany were often frightening and cruel. This National Geographic feature brings you 14 tales based on a 1914 translation. Click on the treasure box to find information about the Grimm brothers, a map, an activity for kids, and the list of stories, some with audio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Run on sentences, modifiers, punctuation, spelling rules, paragraph and essay writing, if you have a grammar or writing question, you can probably find the answer here. If you can't find it yourself, there is an expert who will help, just Ask Grammar! Check the online textbook, Sentence Sense, for practicing your writing skills. You can also try over 150 practice quizzes to test your grammar, spelling, and punctuation skills."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Author Jon Scieszka (Stinky Cheese Man and Time Warp Trio) is promoting a literacy initiative for boys. He is hoping that this initiative will help boys who struggle with reading, score lower on tests, and don’t see male role models in books as often as females. There are suggestions for parents, teachers, and librarians on how to promote reading for boys. Book titles are suggested for young boys, early readers, and older guys including fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Guys can write in and suggest their favorite books."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Formerly known as the Sign Language Dictionary Online, HandSpeak is a visual Sign Language dictionary on the Web. There are new words added daily and you can browse previous entries by subject heading or alphabetically. The entries have the keyword, a short video file to demonstrate the movement of the sign, and what the sign means if it is not exactly what the keyword indicated."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Fun and Games section will be a hit with Harry Potter fans, young and not-so-young. Try the three Hogwarts games in which you choose the right answer to help Harry get through his first three years at school. You receive a score at the end of each game and if you choose an incorrect answer, an explanation is given. Try the scrambled Wizard Words, they aren't as easy as they look! You can also print the crossword puzzle with clues covering all three books to date. Find out more about author J.K. Rowling by reading interview and chat transcripts. And be sure to check the monthly question in the Reading Circle."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Have you ever wanted to send someone a Howler? Now is your chance. Bloomsbury is the British publisher of the Harry Potter books, and they have a site full of very funny howlers (angry, shouting letters in red envelopes), a Wizard word game, and a glossary related to the books. With RealPlayer, you can see and hear an interview with author J. K. Rowling. Howlers require QuickTime. You can enter the site as a muggle or as a witch or wizard, guess which one is more fun?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Herbert Block has been cartooning since the Depression. This Library of Congress exhibit, “Political Cartoons from the Crash to the Millennium,” features presidents from both parties, economics, social issues, big business, and many other political topics. An essay by Block about how an idea becomes a cartoon is part of the exhibit, and his opinion that a political cartoon is “essentially a means for poking fun, for puncturing pomposity.” "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Presented by the American Society of Newspaper Editors, there are resources for students and teachers interested in journalism. The guidance section provides resources on journalism scholarships and colleges. Lesson plans cover advertising, copyediting, critical thinking about media, ethics, first amendment issues, libel, and photography as well as writing for the media. The glossary is titled ""What Is That?"" and covers job titles and terms like actual malice, sniff, slug, and payola."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Travel around the world with young violinist Hilary Hahn. Use the pull-down menu of her postcards to read about her trips playing in concerts in Europe, North America, Australia, and Asia. Hilary gives descriptions about her practicing and concerts, her busy travel schedule, behind the scenes photos of taping sessions, and many images of the local people and architecture where she visits. A fascinating view of a professional musician barely out of her teens. With audio plug-ins, you can hear some selections of her playing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Chinese American Experience: 1857-1892 online exhibit from Harper's Weekly online features Chinese American culture, labor, politics, and related topics including the Anti-Chinese Movement. Exclusion laws limited the immigration of Chinese to the United States but in 1943, the laws were repealed and an annual quota of 105 immigrants was set. In 1965, quotas were finally eliminated and by the end of the 20th century, there were an estimated 2.3 million Chinese-Americans. Harper's cartoonist Thomas Nast drew over 50 cartoons featuring the Chinese and their unfair treatment. Another Harper's cartoonist, Bellew, caricatured the Chinese. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

In Character is a series from National Public Radio featuring American characters in film, books, and popular culture. Book characters include Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne, Elmer Gantry, Willy Loman, and Jim from Huck Finn. You can hear audio clips online or download podcasts of prior shows. You can submit your own suggestion for a character name and a short essay on why you think that person is important or compelling.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Learn how to identify, locate, evaluate, organize and effectively use information with this site from Learning and Teaching Scotland. Modules for age groups 9-11, 12-14, and 15-18 give background information and practice in information literacy skills. Examples of ways to find information include market research and to ways to present information include blogging and building a web page. Students in the US will notice some different spellings for words (favourite for favorite) and vocabulary (canteen for lunchroom, or chips for fries). Site requires Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) is building an international children’s literature collection. By the end of its five year planning period, 10,000 books representing 100 books from 100 cultures around the world should be available for reading. Take time to use the guided tour to get your bearings and learn how to look for a book by genre, language, location, and layout. Java and eBook Reader are both required currently, and may be downloaded for free, but the books will be difficult to read on slower computers and dial up connections. In the near future, the books will be viewable with any Web browser, so keep checking back if you run into technical difficulties."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Internet Detective is a free online tutorial designed to help students evaluate the quality of websites and develop the critical thinking required for Internet research. Using a 1950s detective novel style, students learn about information quality on the web, raises awareness of Internet hoaxes and scams, plagiarism, copyright, and citations. The quiz about plagiarism offers useful feedback on correct and incorrect answers. Although this site is designed for university students, middle and high school students will benefit from the tutorial."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Isaac Bashevis Singer (1904-1991) is the most famous Yiddish writer of the twentieth century. A prolific short story and novel writer, Singer wrote many books of Yiddish shetls and folklore, including “The Fools of Chelm and Their History”, “Gimpel the Fool and Other Stories”, and “Yentl the Yeshiva Boy”. The site has many photos, biography, bibliography, and calendar of centennial events. If you can’t get to one of the official events, stage one of your own story telling or reading events at school. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Rowling’s site is like a shop on Diagon Alley. The more you poke about the more you discover. The site overview tells how to move from room to room, provides a sound glossary, and explains keyboard controls. You’ll learn that the site contains magical items. Find them in Rowling’s biography, diary, rubbish bin, or her latest edition of Rumors and add them to the scrapbook. Requires Flash. There is a text only version."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"What a treasure! Illustrator extraordinaire, Jan Brett, continues to add to her stunning Web site and provides printable resources especially for primary students. Bulletin board sets, puzzles, coloring pages, recipes, finger puppets, calendars, art projects, and more! There are sight word lists, Dolch word lists (the 220 most frequently found words), phonogram flash cards, print and cursive alphabet templates, and math flash cards. All resources can be downloaded for free, and are in pdf format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"""Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean."" John Muir was a naturalist, writer, conservationist, and founder of the Sierra Club, and is on the new California state quarter. This site from the Sierra Club has biographical information, games, quotes, selected writings, and lesson plans aligned to California state standards. John Muir Day is celebrated each April 21, but you can celebrate Earth Day any day. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Above all else, we should expect truthfulness from journalists. This is just one of several Citizen Bill of Journalism Rights. Students will understand more about the news media after reading about the variety of jobs found in a newsroom and a newspaper. There are resources for print, online, tv, and radio journalists related to reporting, writing, and ethics. The section on Living in the Newsroom discusses diversity, time management, mentoring, and training. Advice for students who plan to study journalism is given by the Chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"You know that funnel that is created when the bathtub drains? This site from the Smithsonian Magazine presents tales and photos of real whirlpools. Visit Old Sow, a whirlpool off the coast of Maine responsible for taking many lives as it sucked their boats into the funnel. This site highlights several authors who wrote about these frightening forces. Pieces by Poe, Orwell, Verne, and Homer are available in this site along with a poem titled ""The Ballad of Corrievreckan,"" about a whirlpool off the coast of Scotland. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University hosts an online exhibit Judging a Book by Its Cover: Gold-Stamped Publishers' Bindings of the 19th Century. The cloth was glued to the boards of the book cover, an adhesive mixture of egg white and vinegar called glair was applied, the gold leaf laid on, and then the cover was stamped in an “arming press”. The exhibit displays over a hundred book covers and spines with gold stamps of traditional designs, motifs and illustrations. Some exhibit features include the Wild West, coats of arms, and travel books. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The National Library of Scotland presents a site about Robert Louis Stevenson and the entire first edition of Kidnapped, dated 1886. The book, in PDF, can be browsed and searched by keyword or phrase. Zoom in and navigate around the map “Sketch of the Cruise of the Brig Covenant and the probable course of David Balfour's Wanderings.” The site also has brief biographical information about Stevenson’s life. Although he trained and was eligible to practice law, he chose to be a writer. In addition to Kidnapped, he wrote Treasure Island and The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, among other titles.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If you need help learning to navigate the web in an efficient way, this is the site for you! There are nine lessons about how search engines and subject guides work. A lesser knwn method of web searching is presented on how picture search engines work, such as Alfy.com where icons are used to drill down into a search directory rather than words. There are several lessons on keyword searching, such as spelling and truncation (in which you shorten a word to find its variations), and Boolean searching (which uses the terms AND, OR, and NOT to combine terms in your search). Other lessons discuss how ""robots"" search the web differently that humans, how to search for images, and how the Internet is not the place to find everything you need. There is a good description of how selection of kid friendly sites is different from filtering."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"KidsNet is a national non-profit clearinghouse and information center devoted to children's television, radio, audio, video and multimedia. Media guides alert you to quality curriculum related programming. Study guides for many programs are provided. Programs are selected for their educational material, creativity and for promoting critical thinking."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The telltale heart beats, the raven croaks, and you enter the life and times of Edgar Allan Poe. This site is full of fun activities where you are in the midst of the action searching for the cause of Poe's death or trying to decipher one of his messages in secret writing. In ""School Days"" you figure out what Poe's bills at boarding school were when he was nine years old and then you figure out your expenses for a year of school, housing, food and other typical expenses. Plan to spend lots of time here, there are many avenues to explore. With RealPlayer, you can view some video clips including the entire poem ""The Raven"" read by John Astin (Sean's father). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This exhibit from the Library of Congress uses maps, photographs, and the works of American authors from a variety of periods to take you on a journey of the United States. Travel with John Steinbeck’s Joad family from Grapes of Wrath illustrated with photos by Dorothea Lange. Numerous state literary maps are posted and can be viewed in detail or full image. After viewing this site, perhaps you can create your own journey using other Library of Congress photo collections to document the locations of other stories by American writers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site is from Kay E. Vandergrift, professor from the School of Communication, Information and Library Studies at Rutgers University. One stop shopping for information about over 600 children and young adult authors and illustrators! Some contain biographical, bibliographic, and critical data along with personal responses to selected works, while others provide a small taste of an author's/illustrator's work."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"You'll find Robin Hood, King Arthur, Beowulf, Sigurd, El Cid, and a host of other popular legends of literature here. There are pirates, swashbucklers, selkies, and fairy tales. This site includes primary sources, commentary, additional resource lists, and illustrations of many characters in the legends. En garde!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Our new national Poet Laureate is Donald Hall. Many readers first knew of Hall from the poem he wrote titled “Ox-Cart Man” which won the 1980 Caldecott Award as a book illustrated by Barbara Cooney. This site from the University of New Hampshire includes 19 drafts of the poem, showing the poet’s writing process and editing. If you are not already a reader of Donald Hall’s other poems, you are in for a treat, as there are others posted on this site by both Hall and his late wife, Jane Kenyon. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Library of Congress and the Ad Council partnered with the creators of the film “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” to “show children and families that there are amazing possibilities when they open their minds to reading.” They created a series of Public Service Announcements to encourage families to read together. Various activities you can try at this site include reading an electronic version of “The Secret Garden”, read a poem a day, meet Frederick Douglass through his autobiography, read letters from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, and learn about Braille."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Did you know that Rap stands for Rhythm and Poetry? This site is for upper elementary students and gives practice with writing your own rap. Starter lines are suggested, practice with similes are provided, and students can take short quizzes on what they have learned. For teachers, there are notes on the site, printable versions of the poetry texts, and detailed lessons plans for each term in years 4-6. RealPlayer is required to hear the poems and raps. The high tech version requires Java and has a set of writing tools (rhyming dictionary, beatbox, scrapbook). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Literacy Center offers a fun and interactive site where your early learner can explore numbers, letters, and colors in English, Spanish, German, and French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Created by KTCA, Twin Cities Public Television, this site explores the Givens Collection, a unique assemblage of African-American literature celebrating the people, ideas and eras that these works represent. Read excerpts from writers from the days of slavery, the Black Renaissance and through to today. Also included are online study guides for teachers and RealVideo clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Examples of fables, folktales, fairy tales, and myths, many from India, are found on this site. The myths are related to important religious holidays (Easter, Passover, and Diwali), folktales explain the world around us, and the fables teach a lesson. The fairy tale section includes information about fairies from different cultures such as boggarts, brownies, and leprechauns. Elementary students can solve a crossword puzzle or help spin a tale by adding their story to one that is started online in the Things To Do area."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site focuses on how Mark Twain and his works were created and defined, marketed and performed, reviewed and appreciated. The goal is to allow readers to see what Mark Twain and ""his times"" said about each other. Contained here are dozens of texts and manuscripts, contemporary reviews and articles, hundreds of images, and many different kinds of interactive exhibits. Try the Mark Twain Memory Building game, even when you get a question wrong, there is an interesting friend from Twain's life to set you straight."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This Web site provides parents, teachers, and librarians with practical information and hands-on activities to help give kids the ""cyber smarts"" they need to make wise and safe online decisions. In addition to classroom resources and handouts, there are sections related to teaching kids to be safe and responsible online, authentication of online information, and online marketing to kids and privacy issues. The teachers' section has frameworks and lesson plans for grades K-12. The site is also available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Communication is essential to humans, and this site from the Museum of Science in Boston addresses non-verbal communication, attempts to communicate with extraterrestrial life, animal communication, the way the Internet has created a “global village,” and the evolution of language. You’ll find activities, scientist essays and extra resources. Activities include Six Degrees of Separation, SETI (Searching for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence), and Meaning with Music where you see the same video clip and hear five different music clips, creating different moods. QuickTime is required for the music activity."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"A companion site to Anthology of Modern American Poetry (Oxford University Press, 2000), 161 poets are profiled including biographical information, critical essays, poems, and interviews. Other features are photographs and illustrations, drafts of poems, and historical background. Themes related to selected poets include Angel Island Poetry, the Spanish Civil War, the Holocaust, World War II, and the Vietnam War."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The My Hero Project encourages students, teachers, and parents to submit stories about their heroes, comeone who represents strength and courage to overcome obstacles in life. Sometimes the heroes are famous, such as Christopher Reeve, Anne Frank, and Venus Williams, but many are people who have made an impact on a family member, friend or even a stranger. The categories of heroes include: lifesavers, peacemakes, artists, poets, scientists, and teachers. One category presents animal heroes including the lowland gorilla Binti Jua, who rescued a boy who fell 18 feet into her enclosure and carried him to the door for zookeepers to care for him. You can nominate a hero of your own and describe why that person is a hero for you."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Learn about author C.S. Lewis and his famous characters from the seven Chronicles of Narnia. You’ll find many selections from the books, detailed illustrations by artist Pauline Baynes, a glossary of characters, and colorful maps. An interesting timeline shows Narnian years as compared to English years. The quiz is tougher than it looks, you may have to brush up on your Narnia knowledge if you have already read the books. Audio clips of chapter selections are in QuickTime 4. There is a teacher guide in PDF format in the section Books and Resources. The site is sponsored by HarperCollins Publishers Inc."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The National Institute for Literacy is an interagency group from the Departments of Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services. The Institute serves as a clearinghouse for literacy resources across the US. It focuses on family and adult literacy, and provides online training materials for people working with these groups and volunteer literacy programs. Numerous Literacy Fact Sheets include findings and statistics from research studies related to family environment, correctional education, English as a Second Language, learning disabilities, and health, and how each relates to literacy. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The University of Virginia provides this digital archive of more than 150 texts by and about American Indians. The texts are organized by author, also searchable by keyword."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This elegantly designed site is the online companion to the Freedom Forum's museums in Virginia, New York, and California. Visitors to the site will find information about Newscapade, the museum's traveling exhibit program; exhibits currently showing at the museum; and lesson plans and other educational materials. Two online, interactive exhibits are ""The Adventures of Chip Tracer, Cyber Journalist,"" an animated look at the top stories of all time; and ""The Top 100 Stories,"" in which viewers can compare their own ranking of the century's newsworthy events with the rankings of noted journalists. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Peanuts is the world's most widely read comic strip. The official Peanuts Website from United Media provides you to games, comic strips, background information, and trivia about the whole gang. Sample cartoons are in French, Spanish, German, and Japanese. Visit another time and they might be in Portuguese or Russian. E-cards and video clips are in Flash format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"There are languages here most of us have never known existed. Represented at this site is information about over 160 different writing systems. Each one has an illustration, details of its origin, usage, notable features and the language(s) written with it, a sample text, and links to further information. The types of writing systems included are alphabetic (abjads and alphabets), syllabic (symbols for consonants and vowels), logographic (symbols for words such as Chinese symbols), undeciphered, and alternative (including Cirth and Klingon). There are also tips about learning another language. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Need a refresher on punctuation, essay writing, or parts of speech? The Perdue OWL site has more than a hundred ""handouts"" on topics related to the writing process. Although the site is intended for university students, many of the topics will be helpful for middle and high school students. These concise topics can help by serving as introduction, reference, practice, or review. Find useful pointers on how to start, write and edit paragraphs, essays, research reports."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If time is short and you need lesson plans fast, this is the place for you. Ray Saitz, a veteran English, history, art, drama, and special education teacher, has created this site with you in mind! As a teacher tired of finding lessons with little depth on the Internet, Ray decided to develop a truly useful site by bringing together a collection of lessons that are ""tried and true,"" that really ""wor""k in the classroom. You'll even find the rationale behind each lesson, handout and evaluation."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Kids can use this site to do alphabet dot-to-dots, play with a coloring dictionary, create their first database, or count coins. (Shockwave required) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Follow the development of the children's book Zoom Upstream through the creative process to the printing process to the distribution process. Sections include the idea, the writing, finding the illustrator, the pictures, printing, and selling the book. Try to crack the code in the printing section. This site is in English and French."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

This is a great resource for people who need help with punctuation, writing effective sentences, and essay writing. Essay types include thesis, informal, argumentative, and exploratory essays. Examples of sentence structure are given and then sample exercises give you a chance to practice what you've learned. Ten helpful organizing processes include pyramids, webs, analysis and synthesis.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This rich site, produced by members of Tufts University's Classics Department, provides visitors with a wealth of information about the classical Western world. The site includes an atlas, encyclopedia, introductory essays to ancient Greek and Roman life, English-to-Greek and English-to-Latin dictionaries, classic texts, and images of art and archaeology."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"1. Hi -- 2. Trust Me -- 3. You Need -- 4. Hurry -- 5. Buy Sound like many commercials you've seen? This is ""The Pitch"", the basic pattern of persuasion of commercial advertising. This site is for students and teachers investigating persuasion techniques of modern advertising and political rhetoric. Other topics are: Intensify/Downplay Schema, and Counter-Propaganda Axioms."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The University of San Francisco School of Law archives articles written about how law is portrayed on the large and small screen. You’ll find essays on movies directly related to law such as “Erin Brockovich” and “Twelve Angry Men” but also unlikely films such as “Babe”. Television shows including “West Wing” and “The Practice” are critiqued on how the legal profession plays a part in each. These essays would be a good discussion starter to high school classes studying law.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Thomson Gale provides a free collection of resources and activities about poets and poetry. There are biographies, quizzes, and a timeline of famous poets. Some are from the United States like Rita Dove, Phyllis Wheatley, and Walt Whitman, but others are from long ago, such as Dante, and far away, like Basho. The biographies include writings, criticism, and suggested essay questions. Abbreviated activities approach poems from different themes of death, beauty, form, struggle, and identity."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Poetic License site complements the television film of the same name, providing a platform for teen performance poets. A Teacher’s Lounge includes an extensive curriculum of multimedia resources for the classroom, an e-newsletter, and a discussion area. The Teen Voices area is for teens to post their poems and to have others critique their work. The Online Poetry Journal changes monthly. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"A poem a day, for 180 days, is sponsored by the Library of Congress and Poet Laureate Billy Collins and encourages schools to incorporate poetry reading in the daily schedule. Aimed for high school audiences, accessible poems by poets including Jane Kenyon, Forrest Hamer, and Thomas Lux cover topics ranging from grieving to family issues to into whose lawn not to hit a ball. Each poem includes a short description relating what the poem is about. The site offers suggestions on how to read a poem aloud, and with RealPlayer, you can hear Collins read a piece as a model. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The Daily Poetry Association spotlights a new work each day from some of the U.S.'s premier and lesser known contemporary poets. Poems are chosen from books or journals which are currently or imminently available in print or online publications. Biographical information for each poet is also available.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Sometimes words can’t convey what photographs can. Photographer Charles Moore was present for many of the Civil Rights events in the early 1960s, from Martin Luther King’s arrest in Montgomery, Alabama to Klansmen burning a cross. To navigate the photos on this site, click on the single words such as: riots, Dragon, widow, or vote. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Poynter Institute is a school for journalists, teachers, and students of journalism. The main themes covered in the site are leadership, photojournalism, tv and radio, writing and editing, ethics, diversity, and design and graphics. Most topics have articles, tip sheets, and bibliographies which are also housed in the Resource Center. In addition, the Poynter Extras are features on election coverage, September 11, and journalism and business values."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Jim Davis, creator of the Garfield comic strip, has partnered with Ball State University to host a site for primary and intermediate elementary students, with narration for students who learn best by listening or are not readers yet. The Reading Ring has you put a comic strip in the proper sequence and answer questions about the storyline. Orson’s Farm is about rhyming words. Other games are about reading, writing, math, and art. Flash 7 is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Project Look Sharp from Ithaca College focuses on integrating media literacy into the curriculum. Twelve basic principles for incorporating media literacy into any curriculum are presented for all grades and also for specific levels: early elementary, older elementary, middle, and high school students. Some principles address when and why to use media in the classroom, and how to view different media for possible bias and credibility issues. There is a list of materials about media literacy for different age groups and formats."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Online Ethics Center hosts a site about moral exemplars, scientists who have done the right thing under difficult circumstances. In spite of chemical company denials, Rachel Carson investigated the dangers of pesticides to wildlife and the environment in her 1962 book ""Silent Spring"". She is considered a pioneer environmentalist in calling for restrictions on herbicides and pesticides, particularly DDT. In addition to biographical information are excerpts from letters, a summary of Silent Spring, and other supporting material. The site is also available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site shows the progression of communication from prehistory to the present. It includes the development of verbal and non-verbal communication, prehistoric cave drawings and hieroglyphics, semaphore, telegraph, telephone, radio, television, and today's advanced computer and satellite-based systems. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The official Read Across America Day, sponsored by the National Education Association, is celebrated on March 2 of every year, in honor of Dr. Seuss’s birthday. For elementary and middle school educators and parents who want to participate in the annual event, investigate the tips and inspiration to conduct your own event. There are also suggestions for encouraging teens to read. Print certificates, posters, and bookmarks, and other reading activities. Be sure to check out the monthly reading activities including popular author and illustrator birthdays."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Read In! promotes and encourages global literacy and the use of telecommunications technology in education by presenting a day in May (May 10, 2001) in which children's and young adult authors are available for a chat using Palace software, which can be downloaded for free. Throughout the year, you can access the transcripts of previous Read In author chats, view author profiles, and read columns from contributing educators focusing on literacy. The Active Reader Zone features games and activities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site is created by Mona Kerby, an assistant professor at Western Maryland College and is sponsored by the Carroll County Public Library in Westminster, Maryland. It provides book reviews for readers in grades 2-8. Search categories include Caldecott and Newbery winners, state awards, fiction, nonfiction, picture books, young adult, and new books. The Author Corner is a place where young readers can meet authors and illustrators."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Summer vacation is a great time to read! You probably have more free time to read during your summer break than any other time of the year. From the people who bring you RIF, Reading is Fundamental, the Reading Planet is an online collection of activities, games, interviews, and reviews about books. There is a summer reading contest, suggestions of books by genre for different age groups, and collaborative story writing. Print off the monthly activity calendar to hang in your room or on your refrigerator for some new ideas for reading and writing fun. There is lots of good information for teachers and parents too. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Enter the gates of Brian Jacques's Redwall series. There are 13 books so far, full of mice, moles, badgers, and others with the good characteristics of humans, who face the evil side of humans in the forms of rats, weasels, and foxes. Find crossword puzzles for each book, a gallery of characters, and information about illustrators of the Redwall books. You'll also find transcripts of interviews, a biography, and answers to questions readers asked Brian Jacques."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This timeline from 1941 to 1973 presents the reporters and journalism of the American Civil Rights Movement. Over 100 reporters are featured along with short biographies, bibliographies and some selected texts in this anthology from the Library of America. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"High school journalism students will find this handbook from the Institute for War and Peace Reporting for beginning Afghan reporters to be similar to their own journalism textbook. Similar sections are sources, structure, quotations, and style, but the section on journalism safety is unique. Afghan journalists are urged to avoid being a target, to dress differently from soldiers but not in bold colors, try not to be in the first or last vehicle in a convoy, and beware of mines. A strong message in the handbook is that good journalists are accurate, fair, and impartial and that journalism can be a watchdog on power, reporting on leaders in government, informing their own citizens as well as the world. This handbook is available only in pdf format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"According to this site, fifty to ninety percent of the world's languages are predicted to disappear in the next century. The Rosetta Project’s mission is to preserve at least a thousand of these languages on this free site. Since this is an evolving project, not all languages are described completely, but you’ll be amazed at the number of languages you never knew existed. The languages are described with metadata related to detailed descriptions, grammar, orthography, and other specific information. There is often a common core word list provided, called a Swadesh list, of terms typically collected in linguistic fieldwork. Browse around by language name, language family, or country. Advanced language students will be interested to see the similarities on the Swadesh lists among language families such as Spanish, Aragonese, Galacian, and Catalan. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"In the mid 1850s, Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a letter to his editor complaining of those ""scribbling women"" who were reaching readers, pushing his books aside. Northeastern University has created a set of thirty-minute dramatizations of short stories by American women writers Harriet Jacobs, Louisa May Alcott, Zora Neale Hurston, among others. The plays have an audio version, synopsis, interpretation, author biographies, and lesson plans for high school students. RealAudio or Windows Media Player are required to hear the audio plays. To access the lesson plans, you need to register (free). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee's Web site will be updated every Monday until June 4, 2001. Visit Carolyn's Corner to explore word elements, complete word puzzles, answer questions posed by an etymology expert, learn various ways to study, and more. Practice spelling with the 2001 Audio Paideia. You will also find a calendar, a listing of local bees, rules, spelling bee history, and a catalog of products."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Seattle Public Library offers children, teens, and adults reading lists and Pearl's Picks from Book Lust author Nancy Pearl. Find out how to start a book club, recommended books for discussions for young adults and children, and suggestions on how to lead a discussion. The site also provides New York Times Best Seller lists for fiction and non-fiction and podcasts of author lectures, discussions, and readings.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If you need general information about William Shakespeare, you’ll find FAQs, an outline of his life, his schooling, Stratford, what he looked like according to various artists, and plots of the plays. There are also study materials and floor plans of Shakespeare’s birthplace and Anne Hathaway’s cottage. Images and descriptions of artifacts and replicas demonstrate the use of everyday objects. The virtual tours require the Viscape plugin."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Folger Shakespeare Library has a fun site for kids with coloring pages, puzzles, maps, and a detective game to figure out what Shakespeare characters are quoted. A section on words includes scripts for children, weird words, insults (Thou peevish dog-hearted snipe!), and compliments (Thou precious tender-hearted valentine). Queen Elizabeth I is also featured with activities about which Shakespeare plays she enjoyed and how to dress like a queen. Many of the printable pages are in PDF format. Don’t miss the other exhibits at the main Folger site including Shakespeare’s Unruly Women, Food in Shakespeare’s England, and The Housewife’s Rich Cabinet with remedies for ailments and vermin in the house. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Emory University provides this rich site useful to art and language arts educators. Here you'll be able to access paintings and commentary inspired by more than thirty of Shakespeare's works; search by play title or by choosing one of the 130 artists listed. A bibliography is also provided.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"You may not get a chance to go to the real British Library, but you can read the digitized Shakespeare plays in quarto format online. Quartos were cheap pamphlets printed and folded twice, giving a four-leaf “quire”. There are 21 plays in quarto you can read and compare different versions of many of the plays. In the Afterlife section, you can hear some audio clips (RealPlayer) of Laurence Olivier as Hamlet and Paul Robeson as Othello. Supplemental materials include a glossary, bibliography, views from experts, timeline, background information about Shakespeare, and commentary about his works over the centuries. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site, sponsored by the University of Reading (UK), provides background information on Shakespearean performance in original conditions. The focus is the construction of a replica of the Globe playhouse in London and includes pages devoted to the original Globe and other playhouses in Early Modern London, reports and photographic documentaries on reconstruction and performances at the New Globe, and also some practical information."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site is intended to help beginners as well as experts make sense of rhetoric. It is a guide to the terms of classical and renaissance rhetoric. The left frame houses the major categories such as Branches of Oratory and Persuasive Appeals. The right frame houses the figures of speech such as adage and allegory, many with examples, related figures, and definitions. So, what is a rhetorical question? The rhetorical question is usually defined as any question asked for a purpose other than to obtain the information the question asks, to affirm or deny a point strongly by asking it as a question. Is that clear?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Step your way through this fashion site of shoe styles of the 20th century. To navigate through the site, you can “dial a decade” to find out different styles and a bit of the history of the US culture at that time. Each shoe image can be inspected more closely by zooming in and rotating. In addition to the images, you’ll find descriptions of the shoes, film clips of fashions of the decade, and shoe advertisements. Special features include Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers. Requires QuickTime 4, Flash, and Java. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Did you ever wonder what a dog says in Spanish? In Hindi? Or in Macedonian? This site will provide you with 37 written animal sounds in almost as many languages. Although the animal sounds are the same no matter where you hear them, the words people use for those sounds vary among the languages. The Spanish page includes alternate words for sounds among the different Spanish speaking countries. What a horse says in Spain is different from what it says in Columbia, Paraguay, and Peru. See if you can track the similarities across the world."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Did you know the Spanish alphabet was changed in 1994? Whether you are just beginning to learn Spanish or need to brush up on your conjugations or vocabulary, this site is a great overview. There are conjugations of regular and irregular verbs in the various tenses, from present to imperative to imperfect subjunctive. In addition to grammar overviews, there are jokes and sayings. The vocabulary sections include common words arranged by parts of speech, words that come from the Arabic language, and a pronunciation guide. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"You don’t need to be a spelling whiz to enjoy this site, but it helps. In addition to annual spelling bee resources and results, you’ll also find some interesting facts about dictionaries. 200 years ago, Noah Webster wanted to reform written English words to reflect consistent spelling as well as dropping the British spellings. Some of the words he was able to change were gaol to jail and humour to humor. Apparently, he couldn’t get some of his other ideas accepted like spelling “women” as “wimmin” or “ache” as “ake” even though that is how they sound. Another section of the site is the “The Story of PHAT,” or how a word gets into the dictionary. A spelling quiz gives you a short definition and phonetic spelling but you come up with the actual spelling, if you can. There is also a list of the past decade of winning words, the latest being “ursprache.” "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Developed specifically for the K-2 emergent reader, Starfall aims to develop phonemic awareness, build vocabulary and improve comprehension. More than a dozen interactive reading experiences are available online, and teachers may request free writing journals that correspond with the online stories. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Storytelling serves many functions beyond merely entertainment, such as passing down traditions, explaining how to behave and why, how certain landforms came to be according to a particular culture, and as the beginning of a child's education. This site from the Australian Museum Online has recorded stories of the Dreamtime, or the ""time before time"", that are about the creation, animals, and cautionary tales. Each story has a short introduction, a text version, audio, high and low quality video, and a glossary. RealPlayer is required and can be downloaded free from the site. Other sections of the site are for kids, teachers, and an introduction to Indigenous Australia. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Preschoolers will enjoy the colorful graphics of these short stories. Each animated online story also has an accompanying online activity, take home activity and reading list. The themes of stories include gorillas, babies, pets, bath time, monkeys, and shapes. All the stories are also available in Spanish, which is also good practice for students in Spanish class. Flash is required for the stories. Parent Activities are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Tao Te Ching, attributed to the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu (or Lao Tze) is a collection of 81 short chapters (verses) and forms the central text of Taoism. This site from the University of Florida provides an introduction and translation of all chapters. Links to other translations are also listed, allowing for comparisons across translations. A section of chapter 33 is translated: “He whose ideas remain in the world, is present for all time.” Lao Tzu may have been the actual author or may have been the librarian who collected the verses, and those ideas have remained for over 2000 years. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Teen Read Week is October 14-20; it isn't too late to start planning! The theme for 2001 is ""Make Reading a Hobbit."" It celebrates the popularity of fantasy literature with teens. This year's theme is also to read for enjoyment. The website from the American Library Association offers suggestions for ways to celebrate the week, resources for parents, teachers and librarians, publicity information, and a section for teens."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This I Believe is a radio program what provides famous and ordinary people a chance to summarize their life's philosophy in 500 words and discuss the core beliefs that guide their daily lives. Journalist Edward R. Murrow began the program 50 years ago and NPR is reviving the series. Older essays from Harry Truman, Helen Keller, and Jackie Robinson are posted as well as current essays from Colin Powell and Isabel Allende. Essay writing tips from the 1950s show are provided as guidance for you to write your own essay. You are encouraged to send your essay in, and maybe be selected to read it on the radio. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"TILT is a Web-based, tutorial focusing on fundamental research skills. Although designed for college students, high school students can benefit from the information literacy skills presented. Students are taught three groups of skills related to research: selecting appropriate sources, searching library databases and the Internet, and evaluating and citing information. Each of these skills is emphasized in a separate module with text, interactions, and a quiz. You don't need to register, you may sign in as a guest. Choose from two versions, with or without plugins (Shockwave Flash and Director)."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Click through images of the year by month to see photos and captions of prominent events from 2001. Within the September section, see the collection titled “Shattered,” a photo essay of the World Trade Center. Other related photo essay links are found collected at: http://www.time.com/time/photoessays/911/. Several of the 9/11 stories and photos are accessible without charge, others will require a subscription although it can be used as a citation source since most libraries will have copies of these issues. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Start with the Introduction to get background information on the 20th Century, then choose a name from the sidebar to learn about specific individuals, or use the timeline found in the Century section to explore some of the seminal moments of the last 100 years. Articles about artists and entertainers who influenced the Twentieth Century include Jim Henson, the Beatles, Oprah Winfrey, Martha Graham, Louis Armstrong, and Pablo Picasso. With QuickTime 3, you can view video clips. The clip from Lucille Ball's Job Switching episode never ceases to be hysterically funny. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Join one of the world's favorite adventurers, Tintin, and his dog Snowy, in one of five languages at the official Tintin site. French teachers for decades have used Herge's Tintin comics to entice their students to read in French. You'll meet the cast of characters including the blustering Captain Haddock and learn about the fifty-year run of Tintin stories. ""Blistering Blue Barnacles!"" if you aren't already a fan, you will be after exploring this site!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site, hosted by Northern Illinois University, is a complete and free introduction to the basic syntactic structure of Modern English and the most common prescriptive errors in formal writing. The first half of the book is devote to syntactic structure, the second to prescriptive errors and how to avoid them. The initial screen lets visitors choose specific chapters."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

The British Library invites you to turn the pages of some masterpieces of literature, music, and art. View sketches by Leonardo, Mozart’s Musical Diary, Blake’s Notebook, and several other works where you simulate turning the pages of great books. As you view the actual pages, you can also choose to use a magnifying glass for a closer look at the original work, read and hear a narration about the work, and hear 75 music clips by Mozart. Shockwave is required and you may need to disable popups. Pages may take a few seconds to load.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"While this tutorial is from the prestigious Yale University, middle and high school students can learn important methods of finding using manuscripts and other primary sources. A section on handwriting examples is interesting, showing different writing styles, such as cross hatching, where the writer filled the page, turned it 90 degrees and continued to write over previous text. While you won’t have access to the actual Yale collections, the searching methods are useful in most libraries. There is a specific page detailing primary sources such as printed texts, manuscripts, maps, visual materials, music, and artifacts, here: http://www.library.yale.edu/instruction/primsource.html "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Verbix is linguistic software that conjugates verbs in modern and extinct languages and allows you to learn the verb grammar, conjugation and inflection of over 50 different languages. It is designed to be a reference for foreign languages students. You can conjugate regular and irregular verbs (shown in red) in all tenses and find equivalent words in other languages. The site provides general information about the language and its origins."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"In 2002, the Pew Internet Project found that 62% of Internet users, 73 million people in the US, have used the Internet for health information. How do people know the information they are finding is reliable? This report indicates that many health seekers don’t use information from sites that are too commercial, or if they couldn’t determine the source of the information or when it was last updated. The report also includes hot topics for information seekers, creating successful searches, and evaluation of health related sites."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Voices from the Gaps, from the University of Minnesota, focuses on the lives and works of women writers of color in North America. Among the dozens of authors, you’ll find Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, Louise Erdrich, Gish Jen, Maxine Hong Kingston, Naomi Shihab Nye, and Esmeralda Santiago. Each author page presents biographical, critical and bibliographical information about the writer. A short note to educators offers suggestions on using the resources in the classroom. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"“Here is not merely a nation but a teeming nation of nations.” is written in the preface to Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman (1855). Whitman was a poet who celebrated the America he knew, especially through aiding thousands of civil war wounded from both armies. This site has the electronic text of Leaves of Grass as well as a short 36 wax cylinder recording of what is thought to be Whitman's voice reading four lines from the poem ""America."" Some poems show various stages of editing in Whitman’s handwriting. For the full text of preface about America, see http://www.bartleby.com/39/45.html "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Housed by the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, this Whitman archive has biographical material, the poems and prose, images of the manuscripts, notebooks and letters, and reviews. Other resources include classroom activities and student projects, bibliography, and a gallery containing digitized facsimiles of all known photographs of Walt Whitman. Visitors can search the archive."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"An essay titled ""Letters from an American Farmer"" written by Jean de Crevecoeur in 1782 stated what he thought makes an American. He defined an American as a ""descendent of Europeans"" who, if he were ""honest, sober and industrious,"" prospered in a welcoming land of opportunity which gave him choice of occupation and residence. This site from the American Memory project presents interviews from Americans over the past generations and how the meaning of being an American has changed since 1782."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Harvard Business School Bulletin published a short article in the February 2001 issue about the qualities of a good leader: integrity, creativity, vision, judgment, communication, knowledge, honesty, passion, and charisma. Think about leaders you know, either in the news or personally, do they have these qualities? Do you? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site from Annenberg/CPB investigates constructing plot, exploring points of view, character creation, describing setting, and analyzing theme. Think of it as a primer to studying literature or writing your own work of fiction. Each element is described and examples from the short murder mystery ""A Jury of Her Peers"" by Susan Glaspell are used to illustrate each element. You’ll see how different points of view work in a story, such as how first person narrative can reveal different aspects of a character than a story told by an omniscient narrator. A copy of the short story by Glaspell is available on the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Exploratorium Magazine Online has a site about the origins and development of language. There are audio clips by a linguist about how language is studied and classified. You can see how words from different languages are related. Be sure to investigate the ""Try This"" sections for interesting activities related to language. Narration requires RealAudio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Author Willa Cather wrote of immigrant women and pioneers in the Plains. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln hosts a site with examples of Cather's writing including scholarly editions of ""My Antonia"" and ""O Pioneers!"" with annotations. Other works posted are examples of short fiction and nonfiction. You will have a deeper understanding of Cather through her interviews, letters, and speeches. In addition, there are biographical sketches, a chronology, photos, and an audio clip of Willa Cather from 1933."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

Willa Cather (pronounced like “gather”) wrote about the land, especially living on the prairie in Nebraska in O Pioneers! and My Ántonia, novels about immigrant women of the plains. In addition to information about her novels, the archive has works of short fiction, interviews, public letters, and journalism examples. The Gallery has over 600 pictures of Cather and related subjects. There is an audio clip with transcription, and video clip of Cather. Read back issues of the Teaching Cather, available in full text PDF versions.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

William Blake was not only an author, but an accomplished illustrator and engraver. This archive contains many illustrations, drawings and paintings of Blake's as well as his illuminated books of poetry such as Songs of Innocence, Book of Thel, Milton a Poem, among many others. If you are searching for any text or image related to Blake's work, make this your first stop.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"William Faulkner wrote many of his books and stories about characters set in Yoknapatawpha County, a fictional county in northern Mississippi. This site is great for character lists, how families are related, and an extensive glossary. You can tour the house and grounds of Rowan Oak, Faulkner's home, by means of clickable maps and floor plans with details. The Library section has synopses of novels and other helpful materials. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site from Ohio University’s Donald L. Swaim Collection of radio shows houses 30 minute interviews with over 80 authors. Literary greats such as Joseph Heller, Amy Tan, and Maya Angelou are some of Swaim’s guests. Listeners can also hear parts of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, The Iliad in ancient Greek, and The Tell Tale Heart. Younger listeners can hear an interview with Fred Rogers and the Tale of Peter Rabbit. RealAudio is required for listening to the clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This collection of images brings together 26 works of art in the collection of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts inspired by mythology around the world. You can view the art by theme or by culture. Selected cultures include African, Chinese, Japanese, Oceanic, and Native American. Themes are myths about gods, creation, hero, myths explaining a practice, and myths about animals. An interesting feature is the ability to select two pieces to compare and contrast and then print your typed essay. There is a curriculum guide in pdf format with key ideas, a photo of the art work, glossary, background information, and discussion questions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site offers the definitive, interactive gateway to all exemplars of qualitative arts information and culture on the Internet. Artists, museums, galleries, art history, arts education, antiques, performing arts, classified ads, resume postings and more can be can be accessed here. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"This site investigates international English from a British viewpoint. Sections include turns of phrase, topical words, weird words, articles, and questions and answers. Visitors can use the general index or search. A recent entry discusses the translation of Harry Potter into American English. The site provides links to other sites on words. Discretion is advised. This site, as does a dictionary, contains words that might offend some users."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Created by the Teachers and Writers Collaborative, WriteNet is a valuable resource for writers and teachers interested in teaching imaginative writing for students in grades K-12. Site includes teaching techniques for creative writing, tips on teaching poetry from the poet of the month, a writer in residence and a virtual poetry workshop! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"If you have ever been stuck on a topic to write about, this site will provide prompts to get you started. Try the many writing games as you browse through the site. There are even activities geared to left and right brained people, to help more logical writers and more creative, spontaneous writers get writing ideas. One feature of the site is the description of some writing traits: idea development, organization, voice, conventions, word choice, sentence fluency, and presentation. This is a great place for elementary and secondary teachers to get ideas for daily journal writing. Sponsored by the Northern Nevada Writing Project and the National Writing Project. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"Ideal for middle or high school debates, this site poses questions about important issues in the news such as health care, fast food company liability, prayer in public schools, and same-sex marriage. Selecting yes or no on any of the issues makes you think about if you really know where you stand on the issue. During the course of each activity, you will be asked four more times. Based on your responses, an argument with the opposite points of view will be presented, just to make you aware of the other side of the issue as you proceed through the site. Teacher guides are available in PDF format and include a glossary, relevant national standards, activities, a short quiz, and discussion questions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts

"The Fourth R seeks to include radio to reading, writing, and (a)rithmetic as a core subject. The curriculum is for developing skills with media literacy, critical thinking, and reporting on social issues. The monthly lesson plan is posted for teachers to use as a starting point, is correlated to national standards, provides a transcript of the radio story, and a RealMedia audio version of the story. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Reading & Language Arts