PBS Teachers™

PBS Teachers

Science & Tech

recommended links archive

"Maintained by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Alabama, this site includes biographies of over 125 women scientists that can be searched by field of study or alphabetically. Also provided are an interactive quiz, crossword puzzle, illustrations and photographs of some of the scientists, and a bibliography. This is a great resource for Women's History Month."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From the Cincinnati Zoo, this Web site is a companion to a local radio show that aims to provide fun, bite-sized pieces of information on nature and wild creatures. Listen to experts on RealAudio files or read background information on topics like the cheetah, bird migration, or rain forests."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"As this site claims, you don't have to be a nuclear physicist to understand nuclear science. This introduction to nuclear science and how it affects us in daily life provides simple descriptions on a complex subject. Topics range from radioactivity to the structure of an atomic nucleus. There is a glossary, experiments that can be done in high school classes, and notes on safety for low-level radioactive materials in the science lab. A Nuclear Science Wall Chart and accompanying teacher's guide is available to download in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The interactive adventure introduces elementary and middle school students to remote sensing and biodiversity. Students interpret satellite imagery to receive clues to Echo's location. The activities introduce concepts basic to the understanding of remote sensing including understanding light and the introduction to the electromagnetic spectrum. Short descriptions and images about radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, x-rays, and gamma rays are included. Java is required for some parts of the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Take your students on a virtual trip to learn about voodoo, caves, diamonds, dinosaurs, and other topics at the Museum's site. Online exhibitions are complemented by timelines, teacher guides, information about museum careers, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Radial , tangential (lateral), and cross-sections of 350 North American woods from the 14-volume rare book The American Woods, published between 1888 and 1910 by the author, Romeyn Beck Hough. Tree species can be searched by scientific name (Quercus Alba L.) and common name (White Oak). Images of the wood samples are in three different sizes. This site will be essential reference for forestry and conservation students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Air and Space Museum's site on the Apollo missions brings you suspense, tragedy, and successes. Each of the Apollo missions includes a brief summary, bios of the crew members, highlights of the mission, notes on the spacecraft, images, and some have audio and video if you have plug-ins that can run them. The earthrise is as beautiful today as it was when first seen 30 years ago. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A field experiment in northern Chile, its primary objective was to develop a robot capable of long distance/long duration planetary exploration. The robot Nomad navigated 200 km of the Atacama Desert. This site provides maps, desert data, photographs, and links to other sources."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Let Frankenstein, Dracula, and other villains teach you about atoms, energy, fuel, light, and electricity. The Miami Museum of Science hosts online activities and hands on activities for elementary, middle school, and high school students. Java is required for some sections. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ever notice why some crayons sink and other float? Are you curious about how they get the lead into the pencils? If so, you'll find the answers to these questions, plus fun, science-related activities on the Crayola Science Lab Web site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Caution, not for the weak of stomach, because this site has some graphic images and descriptions of flesh eating bugs, decomposing bodies, and other grisly tidbits important to forensic entomologists. Some of the tame parts include analyzing handwriting, word choice, punctuation, hand ""control,"" personality analysis, ultraviolet light analysis, and radiocarbon dating of notes from serial killers. This site is designed with teachers and students in mind, as there are discussion questions, lesson plans and online activities for middle and high school students tied to national teaching standards in science and technology. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Discovery Channel digs into the topic of soil. Down and Dirty gives a recipe for soil and describes the layers from ground level to bedrock. The Field Guide introduces you to microscopic organisms, worms and moles. Take time to figure out how to navigate the Soil Safari, it is worth the effort to play the game of stopping the toxic chemical spill from polluting the water and soil. The Safari requires Flash. You will want to ignore the frames and advertising on the site to find the good dirt. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County presents a site about man’s best friend, the dog. Major features include canine communication, evolution and diversity, form and function (senses of smell, sight, and hearing), caring for dogs and dogs serving as therapy and assistants for people with disabilities. Other topics are about urban coyotes and the Yellowstone wolves. There are several online and at-home activities to try. Try out the Yellowstone Eco-Simulator where you try to balance the plant life, elk, and wolves in Yellowstone National Park. The game requires Java. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"EJSE is a peer-reviewed electronic journal, devoted to sharing timely science education information via the Web. The main issues addressed are: using communications technology and information, and research related to science education. Each month a new issue is published. The long term mission of the EJSE is to continue offering quality information and research to the science education community. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The North Carolina Zoo has created a wonderful, interactive site chronicling the zoo's research team as they traveled through Cameroon to collar and track elephants. The greatest asset to this site is the wealth and depth of lesson plans, all correlated to curriculum standards and laid out in an organized and easy to read format. The site also provides extensive information on elephants and Cameroon. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Want some cool, creative experiments to try at home or at school? How would you like to make your friend disappear, create giant bubbles, and make multiple images of yourself? The Exploratorium's guides to these easy experiments bring excitement into science instruction. Dozens to choose from! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Students can increase their aviation vocabulary, find out if they're stronger than air, discover how airplanes are like birds, or make their own windmill. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ribbit, ribbit, this is a site you're sure to enjoy! No matter what age your students are, they're bound to enjoy learning about their amphibian friends. The site is packed with background information, frog tales, a frog tracker that allows you to listen to the ""ribbits"" of a multitude of frogs and much more! Another added bonus is that this site works well with a screen reader. (Note: some areas of this site require Shockwave.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"At 5:12 in the morning on April 18, 1906, the great San Francisco earthquake hit, causing not only destruction from the quake but also the subsequent fire as fuel line ruptured and caught fire. You can see a comparison of seismograms between the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1906 quake earthquake, which released approximately 16 times more energy. The quake resulted in a new theory: Reid's Elastic Rebound Theory. This site from the USGS has links to photos from the 1906 quake and eyewitness accounts. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"If you have ever been fortunate enough to find a trilobite, you know how exciting it can be to hold something over 300 million years old in your hand. These hard-shelled, segmented creatures went extinct before dinosaurs even existed! This site has extensive information on paleobiology (tracks, feeding, and ecology). Detailed pictorial guides help with classification and body part identification of trilobites you may be studying. Dinosaur lovers will be fascinated with this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you ever think about the aerodynamic principles of sports equipment? This is a textbook for every reading level! Choose the beginner, intermediate, advanced, instructor or Spanish (also in beginner, intermediate and advanced) version of Principles of Aeronautics. The beginner version has an audio version of the text. An extensive series of lesson plans and activities accompany the site. Other highlights include career information, a sign language glossary of aeronautical terms, and curriculum bridges. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Australian Broadcasting Corporation's site for students includes compellingly designed features on health, environmental issues, science in the news, space science, and backyard birdwatching. Each feature includes online chats, dispatches, articles, lab ideas, and more."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Are your students interested in inventions? This site, created by the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and funded by the Lemelson Foundation, is a great destination for inspiring young inventors! Here you'll find bios on over a dozen innovators and inventors, virtual exhibits and explorations, and tips for incorporating inventing and innovation in your classroom. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This online exhibition from the Science Museum in London celebrates the centenary of the discovery of the electron. Electrons have the mass of one million millionth of the mass of a speck of dust, how did anyone ever figure out how to see one? In 1897, JJ Thompson experimented with cathode rays to discover particles smaller than atoms. Artifacts from the museum are used to illustrate a timeline, audio clips of Thompson bring his discovery to life, and short animations of his discovery of the electron help explain how it was accomplished. Other topics include seeing with electrons using scanning electron microscopes to see very small things and the Hubble Telescope to detect distant galaxies. Shockwave and QuickTime are required for some features."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Join Mrs. Frizzle as she journeys through the land of science. Play games, view the art gallery, or read information just for Parents and Teachers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"How can nanotechnology help cure disease? Help your golf game? Design a better running shoe? Visit this exhibit to learn about advances in tiny structures and then you have to take time to help Duckboy in Nanoland. Duckboy is at an amusement park that is at first normal sized, then becomes nano-sized. For example, at the “Stuck with the Duck” ride, you help him navigate through water chutes to get to the end of the ride, but then in the nano-sized water, the molecules are so huge that it is like swimming through treacle (very thick liquid) and you have to adapt to the conditions. Other “rides” demonstrate other properties of the nano-world. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Climb into the Kids Tree House to do some research and conduct labs at home. This site complements the television series from NASA geared to grades 3-5. Students do not need to see the shows to use the web site. The Problem Board has interactive simulations of different science, math, technology, and engineering concepts and principles. Problem topics include the environment, inventions, noise pollution, and electricity. The Educator's Area provides an educator guide and implementation strategies, worksheets and activities. Tips for parents are also included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Ninety-Nines is an organization founded in 1929 by 99 licensed women pilots for the mutual support and advancement of aviation. Use the Aviation Time Line to see milestones in women's aviation, including Harriet Quimby, Bessie Coleman, Amelia Earhart, and current aviators. Other nationalities are represented, including women aviators from Germany, Australia, and England. There is a section about preparing to earn a private pilot's license."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Miami (Florida) Museum of Science presents The pH Factor, designed as a resource to help elementary and middle school teachers introduce acids and bases to their students. Activities and lesson plans are part of each conceptual framework: Excite, Explore, Explain, Expand, Extend, Exchange, and Examine. You can also view this site in Chinese and Japanese."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"How do they make it look like the skateboard is glued to their feet as they fly through the air? This site from the Exploratorium explains the physics of skateboarding related to rotational inertia and centripetal force. The site describes the design, materials, and anatomy of a modern skateboard. If you don't know an ollie from a Caballerial or goofyfoot, the glossary will help you. Video clips require QuickTime and Real Player. These are not your parents' skateboards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Welcome to Mars! Maybe you have played the game Red Rover, but THIS Red Rover is actually on the surface of Mars, sending back amazing images. The LEGO Company partnered with the Planetary Society on this project to help stimulate children's interest in science and technology through NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission. Students can crack the secret code on the DVD that is on the planet surface, read the email messages from the two LEGO Astrobots, and follow directions for building their own EarthDial. Check out the student astronaut journals, real kids doing real science with the Rover mission. There is also information about other Mars missions, successful as well as unsuccessful. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"SLN is an online community of educators, students, schools, science museums and other institutions demonstrating a new model for inquiry science education. The project incorporates inquiry-based teaching approaches, telecomputing, collaboration among geographically dispersed teachers and classrooms, and Web content resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Lunar and Planetary Institute provides a DVD containing ten traditional Native American stories by storytellers Lynn Moroney (Chickasaw) and Joseph Bruchac (Abenaki). One teller is Captain John Herrington, the first Native American astronaut in space. The stories explain the seasons, night and day, moon phases, constellations, and other natural phenomenon. Lesson plans and activities with connections to national science standards are available online and the DVD can be ordered for free for educators."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Corn originated in the Americas and is used today not only to eat but to fuel cars, feed livestock, and sweeten soda. You’ll find out about the history of corn and other crops that were found in the Americas and taken back to Europe by explorers like Columbus. The teacher section has lesson plans aligned to national standards. Don’t miss the other sections of this site about pioneer farming, and exploring the prairie. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Through computer processing and enhancement, data from previous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maps that depict the topography and geology of the United States are combined to create a composite of a detailed and accurate portrait of the U.S. land surface and the ages of its underlying rock formations. The new map resembles traditional 3-D perspective drawings of landscapes with the addition of a fourth dimension, geologic time, which is shown in color. This digital tapestry outlines the geologic story of continental collision and break-up, mountain building, river erosion and deposition, ice-cap glaciations, volcanism, and other events and processes that have shaped the region over the last 2.6 billion years. Try the Puzzle of Regions game. QuickTime is required for some sections such as a panorama movie. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Educational technology researchers from the University of California, Irvine, bring you a series of insightful reports that connect school climate, professional development support, pedagogy, and new technologies in research studies. Among the topics explored: is there a correlation between different types of computer use and pedagogical philosophy? Which disciplines make use of particular computer applications the most? What kind of professional development atmosphere contributes to certain pedagogies and classroom practice? Well worth a look! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Tech, a San Jose, California, based museum, is a great resource for fun and interesting technology projects for the classroom. Discover four extensive online exhibit halls all dealing with technology—Global Connections, Exploration: New Frontiers, Innovation: Silicon Valley, Beyond Life Tech: The Human Machine—and providing lesson plans for teachers. Other exciting features are the Robot Zoo, The PC Webopedia and The Revolutionaries, an interview series exploring the stories of Silicon Valley's key technological contributions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you ever think about how chocolates are placed in boxes? It was probably done by a robot. Robots are developed to help, entertain, work, and do many other jobs that may be too dangerous or tedious for a human. This online museum exhibit brings you the world of intelligent machines and how they work. In addition to robotics history, the other major topic is ethics related to robotics. Try your hand at piloting a remotely operated vehicle simulation. QuickTime is needed for videos and Shockwave is required for the simulation."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This database allows students to search for contests to enter based on their location, grade level, and age. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"In this era of cell phones, we often forget that there was a time when talking to someone on another continent wasn’t possible. This site from the Smithsonian Institution Libraries takes us through the history of planning and laying the first telegraph cable 150 years ago to connect nations divided by the sea. From telegraphs to telephone to fiber optic cables, you’ll gain an insight about the unique challenges of messages being carried through wires underwater."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Why Files explores the science, math and technology that lurks behind the daily headlines and presents these topics in a clear, entertaining and accessible manner. Each week you can check out a fresh story and find a quick taste of a savory science discovery. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Theodore Gray is a programmer and math whiz who has created a real periodic table. It is a table with each element and lots of cool information about those elements. High school chemistry students will be grateful for the reaction balancing and molecular weight calculation tool. Interesting facts include elements in the human body, elements in a spark plug, and a fun game to see if you can spell your name in elements (or not). There is a lot of humor in this site, along with the facts, and cautionary notes about dangerous chemicals. Do not miss the great Tom Lehrer song about the elements. Videos and rotatable images require QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Genentech, Inc. provides this site for middle and high school biology teachers to find easy access to their colleagues, scientists, and critical sources of new scientific information. Teachers will find the teachers guides useful while the science mysteries and activities will be student favorites. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Acid rainwhat is it, how does it happen, why is it harmful, and what can be done about it? Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are the main pollutants that cause acid rain, which results from fossil fuel combustion. This site has concise explanations of how acid rain affects water, forests, air quality and people's health. Suggestions of what individuals can do to help reduce acid rain are provided. The Kids section has lesson ideas and activities for elementary, middle, and high school. The site is available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Just in time for Advanced Placement exams, check out these AP Biology, Chemistry, and Physics resources for a review. Resources are selected based on their educational merit in an AP or Pre-AP classroom. The outline of resources is based partly on the College Board's publications and also on the expert panel who selects resources. Registration is required but is free. Each selected resource has a rating according to content, graphics, layout, and user friendliness, a detailed review. Even if it isn’t exam time, this is a great site to find supplementary resources to help you understand topics covered in most AP science classes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you know there are almost 4000 species of frogs and that almost a thousand of them live in Africa? Frogs use their voices to announce their territory, get attention of a mate, when they are frightened or hurt, or even if the weather is going to change. You will help the frogs get back to where they belong and learn their different calls. On the last page, you can get a whole chorus singing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The Clean Air Act requires five major air pollutants to be monitored: ground-level ozone, particle pollution, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. The EPA calculates the Air Quality Index (AQI), an index for reporting daily air quality, based on ozone and particle pollution. You can click on your state to see what the AQI is where you live, learn what you can do to help clean the air, and how ozone is formed. Click on KidÂ’s Air to find a site for primary and elementary grades. Part of the site is in Spanish. The site is sponsored by multiple state, federal, tribal, and international partners.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Nearly 88% of all National Wildlife Refuges and 65% of all National Park lands are in Alaska. If you ever thought about studying mammals, birds or fish in their natural habitat, check this site from the United States Geological Survey. There are research projects about ecosystems and habitats, technical programs and animals of Alaska. Mammals highlighted are wolves, brown bears, polar bears, caribou, sea otters and walrus. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill recovery information is also available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Alice is a free educational software program from Carnegie Mellon which introduces students to computer programming in a 3D environment. It allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games. Models in the gallery that can be used include animals, environments, nature, people, and special effects. You will need Java 3D to run the program.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Don’t know your protons from your neutrons? What holds quarks together, glue? No, gluons. This site is from the Jefferson Lab, which was built to study quarks inside an atom’s nucleus. It is a tour of the three main parts of an atom: proton, neutron, and electron, with clear, accessible graphics and text. Fun facts help understand the scale of these particles, such as if an electron weighed as much as a dime, a proton would weigh as much as a gallon of milk."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The 3 R’s at this site from Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing are: Reduction, Refinement, and Replacement. To avoid using animals in testing products, medical procedures, and other scientific studies, these three methods are promoted as alternatives. Humane treatment of lab animals including rats, mice, primates, dogs, cats, rabbits, pigs, guinea pigs, birds, sheep, fish is paramount. Check the FAQ section for alternatives to using animals in school labs, arguments for and against using animals in testing, and what kind of every day products have used animals for testing. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Explore the Ecuadorian Amazon through online games and activities. The site from Educational Web Adventures provides maps and rainfall data, tells who lives there and how they make a living, assesses the coffee industry and conservation, and features a simulation game that lets users develop a sustainable ecotourism project in the rainforest."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The American Museum of Natural History Research Library provides full text articles from current and back issues of AMNH scientific series: American Museum Novitates, Anthropological Papers, Bulletin, and Memoirs of the AMNH. These scientific publications “disseminate the results of laboratory investigations and fieldwork conducted by museum scientists and their colleagues in the areas of zoological systematics, paleontology, geology, evolution, and anthropology.” Articles go as far back as 1881. All in PDF."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Frogs, salamanders, and caecilians (rarely seen amphibians from southeastern Asia) usually begin life as an egg, change to a larval stage, then morph into the adult stage, although some skip the larval stage. Much of this site is dedicated to amphibian biology, population decline and conservation. There are many sound files of frog calls in MP3, WAV and RealMedia format. Other features include a glossary and a search engine that allows you to search by scientific name, common name, country, and reason for decline."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The University of Michigan Museum of Zoology provides an online database of animal natural history, distribution, classification, and conservation biology. The majority of the animals are mammals. Special topics related to mammals include skulls, hair, locomotion, mammary glands, teeth, and marsupials. Many entries include photographs and sound clips. Animal groups included are mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, sharks, bony fishes, mollusks, arthropods, and echinoderms."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Vote for America's National Tree! You can submit your vote online, the winner will be announced on National Arbor Day, April 27. Arbor Day is a nationally celebrated observance that encourages tree planting and tree care. Most states celebrate in April but some states celebrate in January and others as late as May, depending on growing season. The site also provides information for tree leaf identification, reading tree rings, the life cycle of a pine, anatomy of a tree, and other curriculum support materials."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The ARKive calls itself the Noah's Ark for the Internet era. The ultimate plan is to compile an audio-visual record of animals and plants that are threatened with extinction. Global species are grouped by mammal, fish, birds, reptiles, amphibian, invertebrates, plants, and fungi. Videos can be played with Real Player, Quick Time, or Windows Media Player. Planet ARKive http://www.planetarkive.org/home.html is for elementary and middle school students and the ARKive Education site http://www.arkiveeducation.org/ is for educators with lesson plans, curriculum links, and support materials."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"S.K. Worm, the official worm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, will guide you and your students through the world of soil. Find out how soil is made, what colors soil can be, and how water stays in the soil. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Many scientists believe that the dinosaur extinction was a result of a 15 km. diameter asteroid smashing into Earth, probably in the Yucatan Peninsula, 65 million years ago. Are there any more asteroids headed our way? This site from NASA describes Near Earth Objects, which are usually asteroids or comets, and how astronomers are finding them and tracking their paths. The Earth’s atmosphere protects the planet from smaller asteroids, where they burn upon entry. Scientists are working on ways to deflect larger NEOs. They have almost 800 years to come up with a way to deflect the most likely asteroid on a collision course in 2880. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Each day a different image or photograph of the universe is featured, along with a fascinating explanation written by a professional astronomer. Search by date, topic, or by keyword and make use of the extensive glossary. This site can be used as a fun daily activity or research resource. Want to see something really cool? Search for the image of the sonic boom."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Try these ten hands-on, astronomy-related science experiments at home. The activities are presented by the Center for Science Education at the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory. Build a lunar settlement, make and use a simple astrolabe, and experiment with the sun and the shadows it casts. Each activity provides an objective, how to carry out the experiment, materials to use, and a “what’s going on” summary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Audubon Society is providing the 1840 edition of John James Audubon's Birds of America. Bird species are listed alphabetically and by family (falcons, owls, crows, etc.). The alphabetical listing has images drawn by Audubon, and the family listings provide lengthy descriptions of the birds, their habitat, and personal commentary by Audubon. The entries also provide botanical details about plants depicted in the drawings. Several species illustrated by Audubon for this book are now extinct, including the passenger pigeon which he described as “Wonderfully abundant at times in particular districts.”"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site from the Exploratorium in San Francisco will show you what auroras, or northern lights, look like from space and on the ground, explain how they are created, and show you where they can be viewed. The self-guided tour is your first stop. With QuickTime, you can see a video of the aurora and with RealAudio, listen to NASA scientists describe what they look like from the earth and space. There are also links to related sites and suggestions for use in the classroom."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you ever try to use a machine that had terrible directions, or the knob was in the wrong place, or some other flaw? The site is organized by a usability engineer whose job it is to make sure manufactured items have GOOD designs, which work and are easy to use. There are numerous examples with photos of why some designs don’t work, controls that are hard to figure out, or labels that are inaccurate. Each bad example has a suggestion on how to improve the design. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Join the first all-female expedition to the Antarctic with this online adventure. This Web site includes a full curriculum based on Antarctica and the Expedition and customized for each grade level. It addresses life skills and focuses on such subjects as science, nutrition, first aid, geography, history and meteorology."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Beyond Einstein is a site from NASA which takes you from the Big Bang to black holes to describe the structure and evolution of the Universe. What Powered the Big Bang? What Happens at the Edge of a Black Hole? What is Dark Energy? Two new observatories are slated to be deployed and are described here. Constellation-X will measure the velocities and conditions of matter accreting onto black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will study of low-frequency gravitational waves. The Resources section provides fact sheets, an acronym list and glossary of terms. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ is full of people with big ideas. Meet almost 20 mathematical physicists, mathematicians, astrophysicists, and other “big thinkers” through short biographies and video clips. Investigate string theory, game theory, life cycles of stars, and pure math. Try the Prime Number Sieve to see if there is a pattern to prime numbers. Videos require Real Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Big Ideas Network is from the federal Australian agency that deals with patents, trademarks and designs. You’ll meet over twenty people whose careers are inventing and protecting rights to inventions. Pick a character, fill up your backpack, and play Bounce, the stolen invention game. Use the map, notebook, and encyclopedia to travel the world tracking down the pieces of the invention stolen by the evil Tryan. The “Ideas in Motion” area covers protecting your inventions. Trade-Mark-O-Matic will walk you through the steps to create a trademark. The game Bounce requires Flash. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Vanderbilt University hosts approximately 7000 images of mainly plants and a few animals that are available for educational and personal use. Click on a map or from a list of biomes/bioregions or go directly to plants and select a type from that listing to find some characteristic plant species.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Missouri Botanical Garden has a great way to introduce you to plants. Learn how they grow, different plant parts, how they make food through photosynthesis, different methods of pollination and seed dispersal, and how plants adapt to their environment. There are several video clips using QuickTime, audio clips using Windows MediaPlayer, and animations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Young adults interested in environmental and social justice work can become involved with grassroots efforts that create positive changes in their communities. Educators can download resources to point students in the direction of waste reduction, food and farming, sustainability and green schools. Free podcasts, vidcasts, and video clips can be downloaded. You can read blog posts but would need to register (free) to post comments.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Intended for high school students to researchers, this site from the University of Texas in Austin enhances your knowledge of biology and chemistry. An illustrated dictionary has thousands of terms. There are online textbook chapters related to medical botany and glycolysis, which is related to human biochemistry. Information science as applied to biology is a field called bioinformatics, and if you are a high school student interested in this field, there are many resources to point you to colleges you might want to investigate."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This outstanding site provides lengthy descriptions of birds, migration, illustrations, photographs, sound files of songs and calls, and ""cool facts"" about each bird. Select a bird from the pull down menu for previous entries in Bird of the Week. By using the pull down menu under Lab Programs, choose Sound of the Week to hear birds and other animal sounds."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You know how people from different parts of the country have different dialects? Birds do too. These birds are from Arizona so they may sound a bit different if you are from the northeast, the western states, or other parts of North America. Visit the Virtual Aviary to find data cards about a bird, a map of their territory, sonograms, and downloadable song files. There is a 10 page Beginning Birders' Guide in PDF format. You’ll need to be able to play MP3 files to hear the calls. Compare dialects with the sound clips and sonograms at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/programs/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/ "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Developed by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, this site offers intelligent, informative articles for scientists and families seeking the flawed genes that cause disease. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"There are 14 orders of insects you can put under the microscope in the Entophile Database where you’ll find a photo, common name, scientific name, and description of close to 100 insects. For the photographers in the audience, the author of the site offers suggestions on equipment and techniques for macrophotography. Archived Cultural Entomology newsletters are found in the cedigest containing interesting articles about bugs. Class:insecta has amazing photos of butterfly wing patterns. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This website was produced by the Canadian Heritage Information Network and affiliated organizations in Canada and Peru. Catch a glimpse of butterflies and moths and learn to identify them; learn how to attract them in your yard and protect their habitats. In the Gallery, you can search by color, habitat, or family. Conservation efforts are presented with specific information about biodiversity in Canada and Peru. A teacher section provides lesson ideas. Games for students include a crossword puzzle, word scramble and coloring page. The site also includes FAQs, a glossary, and a bibliography and is available in French, Spanish and English."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Hinterland Who's Who wildlife vignettes have been part of Canadian television and popular culture since the 1960s. This site provides fact sheets and photographs of 50 birds and almost 30 mammals. Some animals also have video clips to accompany the fact sheets. Related topics include biodiversity, endangered species, and what you can do to benefit wildlife. Streaming or downloadable video clips require plug-ins. As with all Canadian government sites, French versions of text and audio are also available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"""Be Car Care Aware"" is a consumer education campaign about the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair. Everyone who drives a car should know about the inner workings of what makes the vehicle operate, because at some point, something is going to need to be repaired and you need to know your transmission from your cooling system. Click on any given system, see the individual parts with a photo and arrow pointing to the specific part, read about the purpose and maintenance of each piece. There is useful advice for taking a road trip, preparing for summer or winter driving, and a list of emergency road kit items (under the Tools for the Do it Yourselfers). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You are Secret Agent Bond, Carbon Bond. Your mission is to gather information about carbon and its compounds. There is an introduction to chemistry and four missions you may embark upon. The illustrations are clear and aid in understanding covalent bonds. Each mission has an instructive briefing before starting the activity. As you progress through the missions, you collect code words to be used in the final one, Mission Omega. James Bond fans will get a charge out of the referrals to his movies. A glossary is provided. Your computer must be Java enabled to use the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You may not want to get this close to a live bee, but look at the amazing electron microscope images in the Atlas of a Honey Bee. By clicking on the images, you’ll see a description of what you are looking at and at what magnification. Detailed line drawings with labels and glossary are also in the Atlas. WebBeePop is a simulation model to study how honey bee population dynamics depends on the weather. The Internet Classroom includes articles on waggle dancing, how bees see flowers, pollination, and trivia about bees."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You are an investigator at a crime scene in a middle school science classroom. There has been a break-in and theft. Using math and science, you figure out who the culprit is by measuring feet size to body height ratios, matching teeth impressions to a bite in a piece of chocolate, and learning about dactyloscopy (fingerprinting). Different careers represented are forensic anthropologists, forensic dentists, and forensic chemists. Some materials are in PDF, and there are teacher resources from this Cyberbee project. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Build your own model of the Cassini spacecraft using the downloadable template. Other fun activities are finding Saturn in the night sky, a coloring sheet, and word find. Did you know that a DVD with half a million signatures is on Cassini? The thought of something with your handwriting on it a billion mile from Earth is mind boggling. Find out what got engineers and scientists hooked on space by reading Moments of Inspiration. This site for elementary students has fun facts about Saturn, Cassini, and Huygens, the probe that will investigate the moon Titan. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A site perfect for armchair oceanography, a global network of scientists from over 50 countries contributes to a census of marine life to describe the current state of the oceans and projections for the future. Some specific topics are Pacific Pelagics, Natural Geography in Shore Areas, History and Future of Marine Animal Populations, and Diversity of Abyssal Marine Life. Each section is rich with images and information. Some sections of the site are available in French, Spanish, German, Portuguese, and Japanese. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"CERES offers an extensive library of interactive K-12 materials for teaching astronomy. Resources include classroom-ready lesson plans from the National Science Education Standards, NASA data search engines, and distance learning courses for in-service K-12 teachers. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The American Institute of Physics presents online exhibits about Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, the Discovery of the Electron, the Heisenberg and Uncertainty Principle, and Anderi Sakharov’s human rights struggle, among others. Exhibits provide background biographical information (often from the scientist’s youth), academic studies, and scientific discoveries. Audio clips are available in several formats."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Building a railroad across mountain ranges was an enormous feat of engineering. The engineer who masterminded the first transcontinental railroad, joining the rails of the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroad, was Lewis Metzler Clement. The biography of Clement discusses the blasting and tunneling through mountains, his invention for bending railroad ties, his design for sleeper cars, and the first electric control system for railroads. In addition to stereographs and other photos, the online museum offers several exhibits of railroad maps, engravings, and other historic documents. A special collection covers the Chinese-American contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad. A Chinese crew was chosen to lay the final ten miles of track and was completed in 12 hours. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Learn about the Sonoran Desert, urban ecology, weather, and the solar system at this site from the Arizona State University. Each of the four themes has five sections: Dig In (introductory material), Sprain Your Brain (games and activities), Surf (outside links for more information), Teacher Tools (ways to use Chain Reaction and lesson plans), and Try This (experiments). The site is aimed at grades 4-8 and activities are written for Arizona state standards. Flash is required for some games."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This online exhibit from the Science Museum in London presents what materials are, how their molecular structure changes during manufacturing, and recycling materials. Among the manufacturing materials that have changed the world are silicon, wood, aluminum, steel, rubber, and copper. Three different modes of manufacturing are described: forging, injection molding, and blow molding. The section about What Are Materials includes images of molecular models and microstructures, such as a silicon chip and Velcro. Games include the Sound Machine and the Quiz Machine, which lets you choose the best material for a variety of manufactured items such as false teeth and replacement hip joints. Some sections of the site require Shockwave, QuickTime and Java."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Chemistry tutorials such as Balancing Equations and Electron Configuration enhance the content in each chapter of this high school level chemistry review (an entry in the ThinkQuest For Tomorrow's Teachers Competition). Most chapters include activities and reviews, illustrations, simulations, and experiments. You'll even find lab safety rules and a quiz. Simulations require Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This ThinkQuest winner serves as a virtual textbook for high school chemistry students. Topics include atoms and molecules, states of matter, chemical reactions, the periodic table of elements, atomic structure and bonding, energy, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear reactions. Each section has a short description, links to the glossary, and many include images or diagrams. This site should be especially helpful for a review of high school chemistry."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"For two years, Julia Butterfly Hill lived in the top of a redwood tree named Luna, to protest the logging of ancient redwoods in California. 97% of old growth forests have been logged and she climbed up in 1997 and stayed to protect the remaining trees. Not long after Julia came down, vandals used a chainsaw to damage a critical part of Luna’s trunk. With intervention from a team of arborists and engineers, the tree has been supported to survive heavy windstorms. Within the Medical Team images, there are sketches of the structural support system designed to keep Luna standing. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society, the Classroom FeederWatch program enhances student observation skills, supports core science content and promotes creativity and inquiry. Middle school students will enjoy collecting bird data, publishing their findings and accessing the interactive bird research database. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Keep America Beautiful project has a site for upper elementary and middle school students on six topics related to waste management, composting, recycling and recovery, landfills, and how waste materials can be burned to generate electricity. Additional teacher background information on solid waste management is available. Includes a glossary. Video clips require Windows Media Player "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"If you have ever been fortunate to see a meteor shower, you’ll know how exciting it is to see streaks shooting across the sky. There are many times a year when meteor showers are seen, the Persieds in August and the Leonids in November. The calendar has descriptions of major and minor activity, suitable for beginners to expert skywatchers. Each radiant (“shower”) is described by duration, including maximum activity dates, sky maps indicating where to look in the night sky, details for advanced observers, and historic notes about the discovery and notable radiants over the years. Comets are also represented at this site, with dates of visible comets, historical highlights, and images."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Chemistry students and teachers should not miss this great site. By clicking on one of the categories of Elements & Ions, Materials & Technology, Biochemical Molecules, Minerals & Gems, or Environmental Molecules, you can see general information and a list of clickable compound classes. You can also use the alphabetical list of molecules from Acenaphthylene to Zyban. The individual molecule pages provide a short definition, chemical formula, other names the chemical is known by (agent orange for dioxin), a short background, keywords, and a very cool java applet (miniJaMM) that allows you to view and rotate the molecule. If you want more details, click on the Crystallographic details link or other visualization options. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This exhibition surveys the history of information technology and its relation to society from the origin of the telegraph to the present. See the ""First Computer Bug,"" found in 1947. There are interesting interviews with leaders in the computing field including Robert Ballard, Seymour Cray, Steve Jobs, and Bill Gates."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The California Institute of Technology offers a site about infrared astronomy with activities, games, ask an astronomer archives, a tutorial, and information about multiwavelength astronomy. The Spitzer Space Telescope is an infrared telescope used to study our solar system, our galaxy, and the universe by seeing objects normally hidden by dust in the cosmos. Check out the gallery of humans using infrared imaging which detects heat radiation. Some interesting images are in the “What is it?” gallery with the difference in a warm blooded person’s hand holding a cold blooded lizard and find out why the zebra’s stripes are even visible in an infrared image. Available in Flash and html versions, also in Spanish. Cool! Or is it hot? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provides support material for teachers, science factoids, a large collection of sample questions and answers from past Science Bowl Tournaments for high school and an Ask an Expert service. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for some sections of the site. The Coal Country Interactive Game requires a download. Practice with the science bowl questions this year to prepare for next year's competition!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Howard Hughes Medical Institute invites curious kids to explore biology...on screen, off screen, and in between. The goal of Cool Science is to help children appreciate science in a fun, practical and realistic way. They accomplish this through intriguing and fun inquiry-based activities for elementary school children."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

How do they MAKE that stuff? Ever wonder how tennis balls, Silly Putty, shoe polish, potato chips, and ginger ale are made? The National Association of Manufacturers houses dozens of videos (requiring Window Media Video) about how everyday objects are manufactured at the plants and factories. Someone had to design the machines that make these objects, someone who enjoys experimenting, inventing, and thinking creatively, an engineer!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Hosted at the Wright Center for Science Education at Tufts University, this Web site derives from an earlier textbook, Universe: An Evolutionary Approach to Astronomy by Eric Chaisson. It describes the origin of the Universe to the present and presents major epochs through history: Particulate, Galactic, Stellar, Planetary, Chemical, Biological, Cultural, and the Future. You can explore each epoch as you move along the Arrow of Time. Examples of movie clips are Dark Matter, Sun’s Life Cycle, and Solar System Formation. Movies require QuickTime or RealPlayer. Educational Materials for teachers and students are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Swiss clocks have a reputation for accuracy and these clocks built by a Swiss clockmaker are intricate pieces of art and technology using air, light, gravity, and other forces to power the clocks. He has created Foucault pendulum, radiometric, rolling balls, and pneumatic clocks you can view in detail. The sewing machine powered CD player is a unique way to spin a disc. If you understand French, you’ll find enhanced descriptions on the French version of his site. Video clips are understandable in any language and require QuickTime 5. The site is heavy in graphics so slower connections might have a lengthy wait to download a section."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Just like you learned how to cross the street safely, learn how to keep yourself safe online. Find advice about common computer security issues for non-technical computer users at this site from the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT). Even novice computer users should become familiar with terms like Trojan horses, spam, spyware, worms, phishing, and hoaxes and how to avoid them. You wouldn’t get into a car with a stranger, so don’t let strangers into your computer either. If you use a computer to access online resources in any format, be sure you know ways to protect your machine and files within it. It requires attention to the hardware, software, and your own online habits. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"As Internet business grows, so does cybercrime. Cybercriminals steal credit card information, transfer money from bank accounts, hack into secure systems, send viruses among other crimes. Learn how the FBI and other law enforcement agencies are trying to crack down on cybercrime. Crimefighting technology of the future includes ""fingerprint"" patterns in a person's iris, facial blood vessels, voice, and actual fingerprints. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The American Museum of Natural History created an online exhibit about Charles Darwin and evolution. Much of the site is background information about Darwin and his long voyage around the world to find and describe animal and plant species which culminated in the idea of “transmutation” or evolution. On the ship, Darwin began to think all species were related through common ancestry, and that they changed over time. The site describes the process of natural selection as VISTA: Variation, Inheritance, Selection, Time and Adaptation. Two short videos of scientists talking about evolution and religious faith require RealPlayer. The online educator guide can be printed from a PDF document. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Travel through 1.7 billion years of geological time in the Death Valley National Park. Use the timeline or the clickable map to view periods of time and types of rocks. There is a geologic glossary to define technical terms with some terms also found in a visual glossary. Crunch across salt pans in Badwater, at 282 feet below sea level, the lowest spot in the Western Hemisphere. Photos, graphs, maps and other visuals provide excellent illustrations of geological terms and phenomena."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The U.S. Department of Energy has selected around 100 discoveries made in basic energy sciences, high energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics, advanced scientific computing research, and biological and environmental research. Each discovery has a summary of the discovery as well as its scientific and social impact. References are included for further research."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Picture a bug crawling across the road directly in the path of an oncoming tractor trailer. That is the image given by a scientist from the Jet Propulsion Lab of the Deep Impact mission, which will release an “impactor” on July 4, 2005, that will be “run over” by the Comet Tempel 1, to create a crater on the surface. The goal is to take photos and send back data on the contents of a comet, and maybe discover secrets to the origin of the universe. Younger students will have fun in the Discovery Zone with printable models of the Deep Impact spacecraft to construct. There are also games, coloring pages, and a quiz. The Education section provides lesson plans on a variety of levels from primary to secondary classes. The animations of the planned impact require either QuickTime or Windows Media Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Make this site a first stop if you are researching any topic related to American Southwest deserts. DesertUSA contains images, audio clips, virtual reality tours and information about many desert-related topics including plants, animals, geology, natural history and people. A glossary of desert and geological terms is also included. The content is worth getting past the banner ads. QuickTime is required for movies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Roll over the bubbles on the home page to find The Virtual Exhibition Features. Uncrating the Cretaceous allows you to reassemble the cretaceous one bone at a time, the Cretaceous Period lets you explore the earth, seas and air, and Creatures from the Cretaceous helps you uncover facts about fossils. After touring the exhibit, play Palaeo-Pursuit, with three difficulty levels. A glossary and teacher's handbook are included. The site is also available in French. Shockwave is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The Academy of Natural Sciences holds some very old (as long ago as 500 years) books on fish, birds, mollusks, botany, herpetology, elephants, and microscopy and presents them for us all to view at this digital library. Sample plates from each book are provided. Picture what you know of elephants, then view the many images in the NatureÂ’s Masterpiece feature to see how elephants were represented for hundreds of years to people who would never see a real one.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Discover information on dinosaur tracks and extinction theories. Find fact sheets, games, training treks, and a gallery of dinosaur images. There is a mystery related to this site---viewers are able to track down a thief stealing dinosaur bones from the museum. Start in the lobby, then go to the front desk to find the password in the yellow files. Trek 1 will teach you about various dinosaurs and the time periods they lived in. Trek 2 will explore the field of paleontology. Trek 3 lets you help catch the thief. Heavy graphics might make for a long download time, but the game is fun, so plan to spend time browsing. The teacher section has lesson plans and activities. Student and teacher versions are also available in Spanish. Shockware is required for some portions."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This is an animated primer on the basics of DNA, genes, and heredity. It is organized into sections on classical genetics, molecules of genetics, and genetic organization and control. Each concept is explained by animation, an image gallery, video interviews, a problem (where you do the problem solving!), biographies of leaders in the field, and links to further information. ShockWave is required for the animations and Real Audio is required to hear interviews. This is an outstanding explanation and demonstration of how DNA, genes and molecules work."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"TheTech Museum of Innovation presents this online exhibit which helps kids understand the physical size and important work of DNA in the human body. Kids can zoom in for a closer look, convert their name using a nucleotide alphabet, and judge ethical case studies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ever get bored in a restaurant, waiting for the food to arrive? This site offers a dozen science activities students can try in restaurants or at home, using everyday objects and utensils. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Genome programs from the US Department of Energy are compiled in this portal connecting the Human Genome Project which was completed in 2003. In addition to the gene mapping for the HGP, topics include ethical, legal and social issues related to gene research such as gene testing and therapy, forensics, and cloning. If you wondered why the Department of Energy was undertaking this project, see their fact sheet, but in short, ""after the atomic bomb was developed and used, the U.S. Congress charged DOE's predecessor agencies with studying and analyzing genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic mutations, especially those caused by radiation and chemical by-products of energy production."" "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From the Miami University (Ohio), this site for young scientists is the free web companion to a print magazine which covers a variety of topics including navigation, time, camouflage, flight and botany. Rich in graphics and sound, some plugins are required. There is also a link to a parent's and teacher's page related to exploring science to children."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Take the elevator to the dinosaur floor to tour the exhibits on dinosaurs and how they may have been affected by volcanoes, a giant impact from a meteor, disease, a super nova, and orbital changes creating ice ages. The Earth Floor covers plate tectonics, biodiversity, adaptations, biomes, spheres (hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere), the rock cycle and the water cycle. The Teacher section requires a password which may be obtained through http://www.cotf.edu/ete/aboutus/AUmeet.html. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Celebrate Earth Science Week with the American Geological Institute from October 12-18, 2003. This year’s theme is ""Eyes on Planet Earth: Monitoring our Changing World"". Part of the mission of the celebration is to encourage stewardship of the planet. Students and teachers may enter contests and complete a Geoscience Career Webquest. Classroom activities designed for elementary, middle, and high school students are based on NCES standards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Earth, oceans and the environment are the subjects of this educational resource from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Special topics include El Niño, tsunamis, and diatoms. Dynamic processes such as sonar, wave motion, and ocean cross sections are animated for greater understanding. (Animations require Java and Flash.) Printable elevation, oceanographic, geologic maps are included. A 2000 live expedition to the depths of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by a Scripps team is archived, and includes, among special features, brief biographies and journals of participants and a glossary.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The EarthNet Project comes from the Geological Survey of Canada. This site for teachers and students has tons of information about fossils, dinosaurs, geologic time scale, rocks and minerals, landforms, climate, mining, and plate tectonics. There are activities for students of all ages, a glossary, and archives of questions and answers from an Ask the Geologist service. The section titled Dynamic Earth which is rich in photos, animations, diagrams and clear information about earth science. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Earth Day Canada's site is EcoKids, a place full of activities about environmental issues, wildlife, energy, and nature for elementary students. Check the Fun and Games section for puzzles, games, and coloring sheets. There is also a calendar with daily environmental facts and recycling ideas. Kids will enjoy spending time browsing around this site, there are lots of fun activities. The Curriculum Connections PDF lesson plans are based on the Ontario provincial elementary curriculum. Requires QuickTime and Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Bet you thought NOAA only focused on weather and oceans, but did you know they are part of the Department of Commerce? Much of what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration does is to calculate the economic impact of natural events such as harmful algae blooms and coastal storms on the fishing industry, coastal tourism, insurance, and other industries. For example, “weather and climate sensitive industries account for nearly 30 percent of the Nation’s GDP.” Other topics include satellites, seafood, pollution, and defense. This pdf document is loaded with facts and citations to further resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Topics at this environmental site are life on earth, energy, water, air pollution, climate change, biotechnology, and solid waste. After reading about the topics, elementary students can do a crossword puzzle, a word search, play memory games, and take a quiz about the environment. Environmental scientists from India are profiled. There are three stories about water in play format. Maps specific to India’s environmental issues are available, which could be compared to issues in your own country. The environmental calendar highlights world events such as World Forestry Day and Earth Day. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Energy is the capacity to do work. Learn about kinetic and potential energy, energy users, and energy sources. Click on the different types of energy source for further information on coal, natural gas, biomass, geothermal, water, wind, and nuclear energy. There are some fun facts and an energy quiz."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Einstein Archives from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem provides online access to Albert Einstein’s scientific writings, non-scientific writings and travel diaries. There are thousands of manuscripts which can be searched, many which have been digitized. Some materials can be views in jpg or pdf format and the collection also includes non-textual materials such as photographs, sound recordings and film clips. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

This site from the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment Program (GLOBE) introduces K-4 students to the study of Earth system science (ESS). The collaborating GLOBE agencies (NASA, NSF, UCAR, etc.) create storybook modules supplemented with classroom learning activities that teach students about topics like weather, water, seasons, and soils. A teacher's Implementation Guide is also available (PDF).

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A hotly debated topic in recent years is the use of embryonic stem cells which are precursors to all the 220 other cell types in the body. This site from the University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a primer on what stem cells are, where they come from, and why they are used in research. A detailed colorful diagram explains how stem cells are cultivated and a QuickTime video shows growth over a 24 hour period. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Oink! Are you an energy hog? How can you tell? This site from the Alliance to Save Energy and their Green Schools Program is designed for 3rd to 8th grade. Did you know that the average U.S. household spent about $1,900 on home energy bills in 2005? Most of that goes to heat or cool our homes. Students will learn good energy-saving habits and they can teach their parents about saving energy and money. A teacher guide and student guide can be downloaded. Games require Flash. Be a Hog Buster!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The California Energy Commission hosts a site for elementary and middle school students. The Energy Story is a multi part resource about alternate energy sources as well as information about electricity, batteries, and fossil fuels. There are many science projects and energy activities for K-12 students. Lots of games can be played from crossword puzzles and cryptograms to several versions of the game “Watt’s That?,” similar to Jeopardy. Other features are alternative fuel cars and profiles of super scientists. The Time Machine is a timeline of historical energy events. Click on the apple on the main page to find the teacher resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Academy of Engineering hosts a site to encourage girls to become engineers, specifically in the areas of space, medicine, the environment, and communications. You’ll find career information, profiles of women engineers, great achievements in engineering, and what classes to take if you are interested in engineering. There are fun facts scattered throughout the site and you’ll also find puzzles, games, and pointers to contests. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The more you know about engineering, the more you’ll know about magic, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Magic is a combination of skill (art) and engineering. Explorations geared to middle school students allow them to learn how to do six magic tricks such as disappearing milk, piercing a balloon, floating a dollar, and egg in a bottle. Teacher guides and student handouts are included in PDF format. Each trick has sections for watching the trick, noting what you saw, seeing how it was done, trying it yourself, exploring it virtually, and where to find more information online. Viewing options are videos and slide shows. Quick Time, Flash 5.0, and Java are required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The K Zone, a site for younger students, is about humans' impact on the environment, for instance, beach litter, exotic invasion (the introduction of new species to an ecosystem), and plastics. There are also games and cartoons. Pressure Point is a section for teens that includes topics, such as water, air quality, population, and energy. Using the Info Point section of Pressure Point, learn about the waste, water use, and other environmental issues in England. A possible extension of a lesson might be to compare England to the United States regarding these issues. Flash 4 is required for many sections of the site. Some material is in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"ENS contributors around the world cover issues and events that affect the environment such as: legislation, science and technology, public health, air quality, drinking water, oceans and marine life, land use, wildlife, forests, hazardous materials, toxics, nuclear issues, renewable energy, recycling, transportation, and environmental economics. If you want to be an environmental journalist, click on the Youth Environmental News Desk for details on submitting articles."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The Science Education Program from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has lessons (PDF) for high school students based on selected articles and scientific research published in Environmental Health Perspectives about current environmental health topics. Search for lessons by type (data analysis, short, extended), by skills used (classification, critical thinking, graph reading), or by subject (biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology).

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Visitors to this site will find information organized into categories like economics, forests, biodiversity, water, and more. Each category includes an overview of recent environmental news and links to substantive material elsewhere on the Web. Teachers will also find a detailed review of various environmental science texts. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is created and maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency. For teachers of grades 3-9, it's an excellent resource providing teachers with a wide variety of curriculum guides and activities (many are in pdf format), community service projects and grant opportunities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The average global temperature has increased by almost 1F over the past century, which over a long time, can change the climate. The Environmental Protection Agency introduces you to global warming, the greenhouse effect, climate, and weather. There are Flash animations about global warming and it is related to the water and carbon cycles."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is created and maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency. It's perfect if your students are searching for outreach, facts, activities or club projects dealing with the environment!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Browse through 520 images from four European science museums presenting scientific instruments made before the 1600s. Examples include astrolabes, sundials, quadrants, and surveying instruments. Images in the catalog include supporting historical material, short biographies of the inventors, technical articles about how these instruments operated, and a glossary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"View virtual skeletons of a human, a baboon and in the future, a gorilla. The University of Texas at Austin provides public access to their osteology database where you can select specific bones and view them from all angles, in high resolution 3-D images. Quicktime and VRML are required and can be downloaded from links at the site. Excellent site for biology students studying comparative anatomy. A glossary and self test are available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This page supplies links to resources compiled by librarians and other information specialists. You'll find out how to tell good sites from bad ones and how to discern useful sites from ""time-wasters"" more quickly and easily."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Fascinating forensic science facts are presented by high school students from California and South Australia. The site includes information about careers in forensic science, a forensic mystery game, and a reference section presenting forensic basics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Journey through 4.5 billion years to the beginning of our solar system, when clouds of gas and dust began to form the solar nebula, terrestrial planets, gas giants, comets, and asteroids. Scroll through an enormous mural to learn what changes have taken place on Earth and the Solar System since that time. Click on the Gallery to view the images on the mural as single objects with descriptions. The activity is for secondary students to determine the order of events that formed our solar system. The timeline is created by The Lunar and Planetary Institute, a division of the Universities Space Research Association. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Teachers and instructional technology specialists in the Poway Unified School District worked together to create Ewe 2, an inquiry-based multimedia project that engages students from distant locations in debates over cloning. Using articles, case studies, surveys, and online threaded discussion, students learn about the scientific and ethical implications of cloning. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"San Francisco's Exploratorium museum provides some amazing online exhibits. ""Sport! Science"" features online science activities tied to baseball, hockey, and cycling. ""Memory"" is an interdisciplinary look at the mechanics and implications of memory for scientists, artists, and others. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"“Origins” explores the origins of matter, the universe, earth, and life itself. The Exploratorium takes you on six virtual field trips to visit scientific observatories to see what scientists do at the lab and in the field at these different locations. Each location has interactive elements, video clips, articles, and images. You’ll visit: CERN to study matter, Hubble to learn about the Universe, Antarctica to explore extremes, Las Cuevas in a rainforest in Belize to study Biodiversity, Cold Spring Harbor to unwind DNA, and Arecibo to learn about Astrobiology. Each observatory presents the place, people, tools, and ideas unique to that location. Webcasts require the RealMedia player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Young students will enjoy finding the 18 species in the Fantastic Forest. Each stop on the path has a left, center, and right view that reveal plants, animals, and natural settings. Move your curser around until you find the hidden objects and when you get to the stream, answer the mystery question to create your own forest setting where you will find three of the 18 hidden creatures. Shockwave and QuickTime VR are required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A virtual hands-on museum from the Science Learning Network. Explore the inventor's workshop, his life, linear and aerial perspective, and his right to left script. This site has interactive pages and activities that let you communicate your ideas electronically. Try Gadget Anatomy and test your understanding of simple machines."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"With recent hurricanes and flooding, it will be interesting to look at the past decade at the economic and other societal aspects related to severe weather. This site is sponsored by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and several other organizations. See how the damage from the 2004 hurricane season ranks in the sourcebook’s ""Top 30 Damaging Hurricanes in the Continental U.S."" from 1900 – 2000. If you’ve wondered how experts come up with this data, look into the methodology section. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Fossil evidence of feathered dinosaurs discovered in northeastern China offer proof that birds are descended from dinosaurs. Three early Cretaceous dinosaurs, Sinosauropteryx, Caudipteryx, and Protarchaeopteryx are featured on the Carnegie Museum of Natural History exhibit. Descriptions of the fossils are found with each photograph, with information about the Liaoning deposits where the fossils were found in the 1990s. Further information about the dinosaurs, excavation site, and cladogram (kind of like a family tree) is found at http://www.peabody.yale.edu/exhibits/cfd/CFDintro.html, the Yale Peabody Museum."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

This online version of a publication from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife gives fictionalized journal entries from pioneers and relates the wildlife discussed in the journals to wildlife in the 1990s. The comparisons illustrate the changes in fish and wildlife populations since the years of the Oregon Trail migration. The navigation can be cumbersome but the material provides students with authoritative information about the changes in wildlife over the century. There are many detailed illustrations.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"To visualize some classical mechanics like two balls falling near the Earth's surface under the influence of gravity, constant acceleration, and Hooke's Law, run these applets. There are applets to demonstrate other physics concepts related to chaos, electricity and magnetism, optics, quantum mechanics, relativity, and sound waves. In addition to English and Spanish, the site is available in Catalan and Basque. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Franklin Institute Science Museum and the Science Museum, London, created this site which explores the Wright Brothers' first flight, and the first nonstop transatlantic flight, made by John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown. Articles, primary documents, images, and activity suggestions invite students to learn more about the history and science of flight."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A project of the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission's Advisory Council on Environmental Education, this site demystifies the elusive Florida Panther. You'll find a rich storehouse of knowledge about Florida's state animal, its habitat and the fascinating plants and animals that share its southwest Florida home. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This ThinkQuest site is about four specific divisions of forensic science: fingerprint identification, blood detection, DNA detection, and fiber classification. Many crimes are solved and criminals convicted (or exonerated) based on scientific conclusions to tests run by trained scientists. After you delve into each section, try the quiz to see if you are on the path to becoming a forensic scientist. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This is one of the coolest sites around! This virtual frog dissection lets you make “incisions” and investigate the frog’s circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urogenital, nervous, and skeletal systems. Amazing graphics and animation are supplemented with clear descriptions of what you are cutting open and looking at. This site allows students without lab access or those who choose not to dissect an actual frog to learn from a virtual lab. There are frog cutouts to print on paper and use as models. Flash 5 is required. Some supplementary materials are available in pdf format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Written for students in grades 6-9, this site is about careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Jobs you may not think of as involving these “hard science” type of subjects are described in the areas of music, sports, games, art, exploration, and medicine. Start by digging into an area you enjoy, like art and design, to see what careers you can pursue such as Animator, Art Conservator, Cosmetics Chemist, Fashion Designer, or Scientific Illustrator. Follow up with the careers that interest you to investigate a more detailed career description, things to do now as practice, read about people who currently do that job, and what classes to take in high school. There is a place for everyone in the sciences!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Genesis mission is scheduled to launch in mid 2001 with the purpose of measuring isotopic compositions of oxygen, nitrogen, and noble gases. These data will enable scientists to better understand the isotopic variations in meteorites, comets, lunar samples, and planetary atmospheres. Follow the timeline, view videos, meet the principal scientists with the project, and make your own model of the spacecraft. The elementary version of the Genesis mission, called Genesis Kids, is found under Products and Activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Just what IS a stem cell? This site has animated tours of DNA, genes, chromosomes, and the process of mitosis and meiosis. Information and activities about basic genetics, genetic disorders, and genetics in society are engaging and understandable for secondary students. Sections for teens and students, teachers, and families are provided with labs, individual and group activities, and career information. Thematic units include genetic testing of newborns, genetics of deafness, and RNA."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you know that glass is really a super-cooled liquid? Glass is a manufactured material formed when a mixture of sand, soda, and lime is heated to a high temperature, changes to a liquid state, and retains a manipulated shape as it cools. This site from the Canadian Museum of Civilization presents the origins of glassmaking, practical glass, industrial glass, natural glass and how glass is used in science and medicine. A bibliography and many images supplement the text on the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Global Rivers Environmental Education Network (GREEN) provides opportunities for middle and high school students to understand, improve, and sustain watersheds in their community. The project teaches how to assess watershed health using the appropriate tools, how to participate in projects to share findings, and how to take action if pollution is a problem in your local watershed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Academy of Sciences presents a site about global warming, the greenhouse effect, and carbon cycle. There are numerous activities (requiring Flash) about changing temperatures and CO2 emissions, climate models, and participation in a study prioritizing responses to climate change. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has developed a large online talking glossary that will be useful to middle and high school students. Each entry has a definition, pronunciation guide, a detailed audio explanation by a scientist, related terms, and illustrations. You can browse through terms or search the glossary. This will help you learn how to pronounce ""deoxyribonucleic acid"" (DNA) and other difficult words. RealPlayer is required for the audio. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Dive into the reef off the northeastern coast of Australia at this National Geographic site full of animations, photos, and field notes from the author and photographer. Explore from the shoreline to the deep sea to find different species of animals, including coral. The image gallery has photos and descriptions of various sea creatures. There is also a link to images and notes from photographer David Doubilet from the companion article “Kingdom of Coral” in the January 2001 issue. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A vast collection of buildings from prehistoric to modern times, with biographies of architects, images, citations, and examples to view. Browse through architecture styles, building types, timelines, locations, climates or Greatest Hits. With some plug-in software, you can download 3D Models such as Fallingwater, Notre Dame, Stonehenge and the Parthanon."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The University of Illinois Extension introduces upper elementary students to plant science and understanding how foods grow. The story is a mystery, with 6 cases to solve. A glossary in provided for new terms. The Teacher’s Guide provides background to the topics, questions to pose when introducing the concepts, objectives, setting up experiments, and ideas for extending the lessons. The student version of each case provides a case brief, facts, mysteries, and activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Academy of Engineering presents a site about the 20 greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century. The technological advances that have changed the world include electrification, refrigeration, telephones, water supply, highways, automobiles, and more. Each innovation has specific inventions on a timeline, such as the health technologies citing the first EKG, dialysis machine, and contact lenses. We usually take these innovations for granted, so as you browse through these resources, think about enormous technological achievements from the past 100 years, a relatively short period of human history, and think about the possibilities of the next 100 years. Some day your kids will say, “You didn’t have THAT when you were a kid?”"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The National Wildlife Federation recommends that parents give their kids a "Green Hour" every day, a time for unstructured play and interaction with the natural world, in order to counteract a childÂ’s "nature deficit disorder." The ParentsÂ’ Guide encourages parents to making outdoor play fun, share discovery of the natural world, and also provides suggestions on outdoor safety, approaching childrenÂ’s different learning styles, and suggested activities.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Learn how kids can make their schools healthier and greener from this site by the Natural Resources Defense Council. In the section ""Investigate the School Environment"", start with the interactive tour to get instructions on how the activity works. Print off your progress report to record notes about clues and discoveries, and then move through two classrooms, the cafeteria, bathroom, closet, and gym to find ways to be a more environment friendly school. The site is also available in Spanish. Flash is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Greenpeace has advocated for the environment for years and their web site provides information about many topics, including genetic engineering. Genetically engineered food and artificial organisms are highlighted at this area of the site. Each highlighted topic includes background information, news, and how people can take actions to halt genetically engineered food from entering the environment. Many primary resources are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Greenpeace has developed a Web site where visitors can learn more about how companies like Nestle and Kellogg's use genetically modified foods. Greenpeace opposes the use of such foods, and offers visitors to its site background information on the subject and the opportunity to become an active protestor."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You can go lobstering even if you don’t live in Maine with this site. Not only can you learn about lobsters, but also sea turtles, Atlantic herring, and marine mammals. There is a set of classroom activities for grades 1-12 about potential consequences of climate variability and change and how it can affect forests, agriculture, coastal areas, and water. The section titled Space Available is about satellite imaging of the earth. In Katahdin to the Sea, you’ll learn about multiple habitats including streams, ponds, bogs, estuaries, and tidepools. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Why take chemistry in high school? What can you do with it? Women scientists are profiled on this site, presenting ideas about how chemistry is a part of our daily lives. The clothes we wear, food we eat, medicine we put into our bodies, microchips that make our computers and cell phones work are all part of advances in chemistry. Some careers you may not associate with this field, like an archaeologist or astronaut, require a chemistry background. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania introduces high school students to several topics including genetics and the Olympics, the Human Genome Project, gene therapy, genetic privacy, genetically modified organisms, and embryonic stem cell research. Several of the features also include teaching objectives and discussion questions. Have you seen any movies recently that have a bioethical theme? This site offers their choices. An online Bioethics Fair and Exhibition open to high school students is sponsored twice a year. Short video clips are in QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Alliance of Innovative Manufacturing at Stanford University shows you how different products in transportation, candy, packaging, and clothing are made. Go to the Processes section to see video clips about casting metal, molding plastics, machining, assembly and other methods to create the things we use each day. The helpful audio and animated introduction that shows you how to use the site requires Flash."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ever wonder how things like bagels or juice boxes are made? This site describes the manufacturing process of many products, simple to complex. Ignore the ads that may appear and focus on the information about the actual product. You’ll find background material, and information about design, raw materials, manufacturing process, quality control, byproducts and waste, the future of the product, and citations for where to learn more. Many have illustrations about the manufacturing process."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A German physicist named Wilhelm Roentgen discovered the use of X-Rays by accident when experimenting with electron beams. X-Ray technology lets doctors see straight through human tissue to examine broken bones, cavities, swallowed objects, and even softer tissue. There is a description of an X-Ray machine with diagrams helping to explain the concept."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"As Space Shuttle Discovery services the Hubble Telescope in December 1999, your students can follow along via live video feeds, image galleries, daily mission updates, and a special ""CosmicKids"" section of this NASA Web site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour the universe by touring the HubbleSite, produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute. In addition to amazing images of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and nebulae in the image gallery, you’ll find intricacies of the telescope itself at this site. The Nuts & Bolts section describes the instruments and how the optics work to capture incredible pictures. Try out the fun and games section to create a hand held model of the Hubble, find out where the Hubble is at this moment, and try your hand at Way Out, a cosmic trivia quiz game. Team Hubble gives you a look behind the scenes at who operates the telescope. Plan to spend plenty of time browsing, this site is full of interesting astronomy information."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Meet sociable humanoid robots Kismet, Macaco, Coco, and Cog, from the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. These machines have been designed to socialize with people and adapt to human behaviors. For example, Kismet can learn from getting too close to someone and can adjust his distance to allow the person more “personal space”. Retired robots are also introduced on the site such as Wheelesley, a robotic wheelchair system. Video clips of robots and interviews with the engineers require Quicktime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"AccuWeather hosts a hurricane site where you can find information about past and active hurricanes in the Atlantic and the East Pacific storms. By clicking on any of the names of storms, you can find the history, images, and videos of the more dangerous hurricanes of the year. For the currently active storms, you can track the position, the forecast eye path, satellite images, and discussion giving updated conditions. Windows Media Player is needed to view the videos. You may want to try your own tracking maps, which can be downloaded in PDF format, to plot a hurricane’s path from coordinates. The Hurricane Facts section gives the anatomy and development of a hurricane, how a storm surge is created, some preparedness resources, retired storm names, and other statistics and graphics. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Updated stories about people, locations, health, and economics related to the hurricane of August 2005 are found at this special collection from CNN. One interactive feature presents hurricane activity in the Gulf coast; another titled “Drying Out New Orleans” demonstrates how the levees were breached, how they were repaired, and progress of the draining via satellite images. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site about hurricane safety and preparedness is combined with science instruction for middle school students. The interactive modules are self-paced with worksheets to guide viewing and the science content is tied to National Science Education Standards. There is a blank version of the National Hurricane Center's Atlantic Hurricane Tracking Chart to use in the classroom. One of the modules, titled “Danger Zone”, describes the four main hurricane hazards: high winds, storm surge, heavy rains, and tornadoes. The “Safety Zone” module covers numerous safety and preparedness tips. Links to resources for helping children deal with trauma and assisting children (and adults) with disabilities during a disaster are provided. Flash is required for the interactive modules, but there is also a text based version."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Track current or historic (1851-2006) hurricanes as well as damage reports. Other reports are weather alerts such as severe thunderstorms, flooding, tornados, and winter weather warnings. Other features include guides to help the public plan for weather emergencies such as what to put into an emergency kit, how to secure windows, roofing, and insurance coverage."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Just for Kids section is for elementary to middle school ages where you will learn fascinating facts about fishes and sharks. Don't miss the image gallery and the biological profiles. The education section includes diagrams of fish anatomy, a glossary, information about a career in biology, and fish adaptations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Science Museum of the UK preserves inventions in science, medicine, and technology dating from 1750 to 2000. Browse by thumbnail image, theme, or by subject area. Short descriptions and importance of invention are included with each image, some have additional materials. Guided tours take a topic and follow it through time, such as women in science. Use the ""about this site"" to find complete listings of Rich Media Scenes(requiring Flash). For example, open the door to the Pharmacy and explore remedies from the early 20th century like the cocaine eye drops, cod liver oil, and Beecham's Pills. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) presents a virtual museum with 8 exhibits related to ""the global social impact of technology and demonstrates the relevance of engineering and engineers to society."" The exhibits all related to electricity in some aspect, whether it is making music or making wars. Other exhibits are about microelectronics, microwaves, Edison, women and technology, and the early days of electricity discoveries. Flash and QuickTime are required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"In the Wild is a great place to become educated about endangered species issues. Made up of four sections comprised of an endangered species glossary, an extinct species glossary, spotlights focusing on different issues dealing with endangered species and a classroom full of lesson plans and activities, plus a glossary and bibliography. The classroom offers teachers a wealth of information on conservation, biology and extinction through curriculums developed for students in grades 9-12."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"High school students in California and Azerbaijan created this elegantly designed site which explores cutting-edge applications of technology. The site includes quizzes (may be personalized for a teacher's specific purposes, and the results e-mailed to the teacher); monthly Webcasts, e-mail newsletter updates, music, polls, and more."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Kids can play Name That Bug, color online with Fred's Bugalizer Studio, and browse the pest library. PDF lesson plans for K-6 are available. Shockwave and Flash are required for games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The BBC has a set of cool games to help you understand your body. There is a 3D jigsaw puzzle to put your organs together, putting your muscles and skeleton together in the correct places. Challenge games about your senses and nervous system stretch your mind. The puberty demo shows what changes take place in your body. All features require Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, along with Al Gore, won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for its research and advocacy on climate change. The site posts slide show presentations and graphics about climate change, carbon cycle, carbon dioxide capture and storage, and numerous other topics. Supporting materials discuss emission scenarios, drought, and greenhouse gasses. A glossary is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Spanish and Russian.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"1998 was the International Year of the Ocean and the National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration created a site for kids with games, puzzles, quizzes, and activities for elementary school students. Topics covered include buoys, coral reefs, marine debris, Northwest salmon, marine mammals, and facts about fish. The Whale and Plover is a tale and coloring book in English and Hawaiian. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Four modules from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory introduce you to basic concepts surrounding electricity and magnetism, matter, energy, and fusion. Definitions, hands-on-activities to try at home or school, and questions with answers supplement the basic concepts. You have probably heard that a watched pot never boils, but on this site, you can boil water by altering the temperature, amount of water and heating rate. This site would be useful as an introduction and a review for middle and high school students. Flash and Shockwave are required for all the modules in this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"In addition to useful information about why physics is the neglected science, why it should be studied, the physics of resonance, and careers in science, the most fun part of this site from a physics teacher is the Insultingly Stupid Movie Physics section. It describes how Hollywood movies misrepresent reality of flashing bullets, breaking glass, explosions, falls, and flaming cars. What is their selection of the worst physics movie ever? “The Core,” closely followed by “The Day After Tomorrow.” Movie reviews dissect the errors and bad science. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Invaders from other planets? No, but did you know that beautiful purple flower appearing in marshy areas is an invader? Purple loosestrife is pretty to look at, but the danger of an invasive species is that there are no natural predators to keep growth in check. Human actions are the primary means of invasive species introductions. These invasive species of plants, animals, or microbes can destroy an ecosystem. Some examples of invasive animals are the gypsy moth, fire ant, Africanized bees, and zebra mussels. This site is a gateway to resources on the species, laws and regulations, prevention, and other information about these alien species."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Lemuelson-MIT Awards Program produces this site rich with biographical information about scores of inventors and the how-to's of patent law for young inventors. The site also includes challenges for kids of all ages, and apprenticeships for high school students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Union Pacific Railroad offers a glossary of railroad terms and expressions. Find out what Broncos in the Canyon do, and learn about frogs and shooflys. They aren't animals in the railroad world. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"JetStream is the National Weather Service’s Online School for Weather, designed to help educators and students in learning about weather and weather safety. Subjects include air masses, wind patterns, cloud formations, thunderstorms, lightning, hail, damaging winds, tornadoes, tropical storms, cyclones and flooding. There are over 20 lesson plans, review questions (and answer key), a LONG list of acronyms, and extensive glossary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This K-12 collaborative exploration of seasonal change and migration is sponsored by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Participating classes will be able to post data from their region tracking migration, link with other classes to compare data, plant gardens, raise monarch butterflies, and create wildlife habitats. Teachers will find lesson plans and pedagogical strategies related to subject matter. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Junior Master Gardener is a youth gardening program of the University Cooperative Extension network. The Kids Zone has two levels, the first is for elementary students and arranged by topic with activities supporting each “chapter” topic. They include plant growth, soil, insects, ecology, fruits and vegetables, and landscape. If you choose Level 2, you enter “Operation Thistle” which is geared toward middle school students and covers many of the same topics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"One of the world’s best zoos brings you Animal Bytes, profiles of over 20 animals housed at the zoo. Be sure to visit the Hua Mei section in the panda profile, to learn more about the only surviving baby panda born in the United States. With Media Player, you can hear sounds of the animals. The Kid Territory has more animal profiles, games, art and crafts, and science experiments with Dr. Zoolittle. Did you ever think about all the different types of jobs at a zoo? The zoo job profile section describes more than 40 jobs at the San Diego Zoo; they aren’t all veterinarians and zookeepers. For people who love animals, there are many careers to think about. The Teacher’s Lounge is mostly for teachers in the San Diego area, but there are some activities in the Teacher Library that anyone can use."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Using lab animals for testing is the focus of this site from the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science. It promotes responsible laboratory animal care and use in biomedical/biological research, testing, and education. The site also provides information on the benefits of such research to animals, humans, and the environment. Other topics include product safety, diseases, careers, and debates related to using animals for testing products and medicine. Given the sponsor, there is a bias to the site to consider, but they offer resources that also advocate for alternatives to animal testing. There are separate sections of resource materials for elementary and secondary students. Try some of the games and puzzles in the “Fun Stuff” section. The site is also available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From the radio show Earth and Sky, this Kids section has answers to interesting questions not only about stars and planets, but also about animals, the human body, and meteorology. Click on a star pronunciation guide that provides phonetic pronunciations for hundreds of stars and other astronomical objects, and if you have RealAudio, you can listen to the word also. Click on the top bar to find out what is visible in tonight's sky."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Internet Scout Project and the National Science Foundation sponsor this ongoing, cooperative effort of four elementary classes in Madison, Wisconsin and Boulder, Colorado. Each month students select several Web sites focused on a common theme and write annotated reviews; past issues are searchable. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You can make any day Earth Day with this site from the American Forest & Paper Association. Find reduce, reuse, and recycle information and interesting facts about trees. In the section “You Can Make a Difference,” find ideas for every day or Earth Day activities. Teacher Tools includes over a dozen educational flyers on paper reuse, recycling, and sustainable forestry for classroom use by K-6 teachers in pdf format. Older students can use the main AF&PA site content, including how to make paper at home. Shockwave is required for an interactive recycling game."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The San Diego Natural History Museum has a site for kids presenting information about bioluminescence, minerals, the eye and vision, dinosaurs, sharks, and canines. Most of these topics include a brief introduction, a glossary, basic facts, a quiz, and a puzzle or game. The interactive puzzles and games require Java.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Blast off with the Canadian Space Agency’s KidSpace. Students will find fun features like poems, jokes, games, and the Galaxy Song. Space careers and aerospace studies are presented, highlighted by interviews with ten women working at the CSA. Lessons and activities for elementary and secondary students are on many topics including the International Space Station, robotics, microgravity, astronomy, space walks, space suits, RADARSAT, space medicine, and recycling of liquid. Some teacher resources are in PDF format. The site is also available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"If you are a bird watcher or are studying birds, don't miss this site! Dissect owl pellets virtually to figure out how many mice the owl has eaten You will be amazed at the tiny bones found in the pellets. There is information about nests, feathers, bird skulls, and eggs. Teacher resources include a bird watching bingo game, flight experiments for elementary students, and bird banding. Try out the Virtual Bird Topology to find out identifying parts of bird bodies that are typically found in bird guides."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Science Foundation have teamed up to create science activities for after-school programs for 3rd to 5th graders. Students choose among 4 paths (Omega, Phi, Tau, and Sigma) to find activities about mathematical inquiry, the Universe, issues in technology, energy sources, and global interdependence. Leader, or teacher guides, are available in pdf and should be reviewed before the students begin since there are almost 100 different activities to be used. Flash is required. Registration is free."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Here is an adult who gets to create art and play with dinosaurs AND get paid for it! John Payne is an artist who works in metal and creates anatomically correct dinosaurs that move. Not only are they fun to watch but the also give us an insight as to how these huge creatures moved. This site from the Children's Museum of Indianapolis has a lengthy video clip of Payne working and talking about his love of the art and of the dinosaurs. His creations are in museums around the world. Spend lots of time exploring this site, you'll find art projects, a dinosaur database, and a dinosaur dig. Shockwave and Java are required in some sections."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Koko, Michael (now deceased), and Ndume are lowland gorillas living and working with psychologist Penny Patterson. Koko uses over 1000 signs in American Sign Language, Michael used over 600. Koko celebrates her 30th birthday on July 4, 2001. This site is full of great photos of the gorillas, including a series of Koko with her various kittens. Find interesting gorilla facts, meet the family, and read the answers to some frequently asked questions about Koko and her friends. Teachers can order an information package. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The University of Illinois Extension tells us about insects which account for more than half the living things in the world, about 10,000,000,000,000,000,000 insects alive at any given time. The site is geared to help students in third to fifth grade gain an appreciation of insects; learn how insects grow and develop (metamorphosis), and learn the importance of insects in our environment. The “tour” is completely narrated in English and in Spanish. C.P.’s Fun Place has a game to create your own bug and add it to the Hall of Fame. Another game is choosing which creatures are insects and which are not. The Teacher’s Guide has many activities and some worksheets in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Exploratorium's online earthquake exhibit includes seismic science information, articles on earthquake-proof engineering, and a look back at the 1906 quake in San Francisco."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"What else can you do with a degree in life sciences other than being a doctor? Hundreds of careers! This interactive site guides students to explore career options for professionals in life science, and they aren’t all traditional scientists. A philosopher looks at bioethics, for example. Dig into the career definitions and then look into the hot jobs, statistics and salary expectations. In the Teasers section, try “What color is your DNA?” to gauge your interest in life sciences to see if it is a career for you. Flash 6 or higher is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour two exhibition halls, one for 19th century and one for 20th century inventions by Thomas Edison. The focus of this site is to introduce the five steps of innovation, the preconditions, the invention itself, promotion, competition, and consequences. Many other inventors of lighting are credited and highlighted. The section on “ink blotters” are ads for lamps of the early 20th century."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site provides a lengthy narrative about chemical bonds and Linus Pauling’s research in that area. There are also primary source documents including letters, manuscripts, photographs, audio-visual materials and published papers all related to the discovery of chemical bonds. It is interesting to read the letters among Pauling, his son, Watson, Crick, and other scientists. You’ll find coffee stains on some, affectionately signed letters between family members, and see the race between Crick/Watson and Linus Pauling unfold. Son Peter Pauling shared office space with Watson and Crick and all were trying to figure out the chemical nature of DNA. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Linus Pauling won two Nobel Prizes, one in Chemistry in 1954 and one for Peace in 1962. He started in chemistry then moved to physics, mathematics, biology, and medicine, so he just called himself “a scientist”. The science topics of the site cover basics of molecules, atoms, and chemical bonding. Pauling’s humanitarian efforts focused on pacifism, nonproliferation of nuclear weapons testing and the danger of fallout. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Live From The Rainforest, part of Passport to Knowledge, is an ongoing series of electronic field trips to scientific frontiers, supported by the National Science Foundation, NASA, and others. Learn about rainforests, and why they are found where they are. You will find a gallery of maps, images, and information on the trees, plants, birds, animals and insects of the rainforest. Read biographies and field journals from scientists and special student. The site provides a multimedia guide to books, articles, videos, CD-ROMs and online resources, with mini-reviews from educators, and an index of all the images, video clips and sounds found on this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Need some new and edible science experiments? Join these mad scientists as they make cheese fractures, homemade slime, and a chewing light. Be sure to note which experiments can be eaten and which cannot!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Crime mapping technology is where GIS technology and cartography meet to create geocoding. It is used to provide a visualization of crime data through maps by showing patterns of crimes in a graphical presentation, aiding the criminal justice professionals in their investigations. This site from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service provides information about how GIS (Geographic Information System) can benefit the criminal justice system. The entire publication is in PDF format and files are very large if downloaded."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole has created a database of nearly 210 invertebrates and fish collected or maintained by the Aquatic Resources Division of the Marine Resources Department. Creatures are classified by phyla. Visitors can search by phyla or name. Entries contain classification data and a menu of other information, as well as a description of its importance to biomedical research. Full-text articles on some species can be accessed via a subject index."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame introduces you to scientists, physicians, and other medical heroes whose contributions have made a significant mark in the world of medicine. The Laureates are the individuals with biographical information and their medical contribution. Examples are Norman Bethune who organized the initial blood transfusions and Roberta Bondar, Canada’s first female astronaut who did research on weightlessness. The Games Lab tests your knowledge of the medical pioneers in beginner, intermediate, and advanced games. The site is available in French and English. Flash is required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A Thinkquest project on human anatomy and the world of medicine, this site takes you on a tour of the body including the circulatory, respiratory, muscular/skeletal, nervous, digestive, reproductive, and excretory systems. Each body system includes a description of the function, organs associated with that system and interesting facts. Each section has a medical library, or glossary, and a set of web sites for further research."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"To viewers in the Northern Hemisphere, much of this site will be familiar, with detailed information and colorful images about the sun, moon, planets, and space exploration. What will probably be new to most viewers are some constellations such as the Southern Cross. While viewers in the north see Orion the Hunter in the winter months, he is visible in the summer months in the Southern Hemisphere since the seasons are opposites. The space exploration section covers space travel and satellites. The sky tours show you what you can see using binoculars. There is also a section on a possible cause of dinosaur extinction due to a meteor impact."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Created by the Exploratorium Museum in San Francisco, Memory has three main features, each dealing with a different aspect of our memory. The first feature explores the anatomy of memory; the second traces an artist as he paints his hometown from memory; the third examines how a survivor remembers the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan. Also included are tricks for improving memory, a forum where visitors have shared their earliest memories and articles about how memory works. This site shows just how instrumental technology can be in the traditional role of a museum exhibition. (Some features require Shockwave.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This collection of web based modules incorporate text, colorful diagrams, animations, computer simulations, audio and video to introduce fundamental concepts in the atmospheric sciences. While geared to high school and undergraduate students, younger students can also benefit from the resources on clouds, precipitation, El Nińo, the hydrologic cycle and hurricanes. You’ll learn why the sky seems blue and how to interpret weather maps. Teachers will want to try out the classroom activities and assessment guides. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Using electron microscopes, a scientist from the University of Hawaii has captured close up colorized photos of insects around us including ants, fleas, mosquitoes, and lice. There are images of things that surround us at home like shower mold, dog dander, dust, and cobwebs. You'll also see incredible close-up images of red blood cells, neurons, lung tissue and more. The complexity of things we cannot see without the assistance of an electron microscope is astounding. Some of these images will make you say ""ewww"" but others will make you say ""Wow!"""

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Just what DOES a microbiologist do? They can be detectives, hunting harmful bacteria or viruses. They can help keep your food, water, and air clean. The site from the American Society for Microbiology also introduces you to types of microbes, tools used by microbiologists, a timeline of microbiology discoveries, and amazing photos in the microbe gallery. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Microscopy is the application of microscope magnification to the study of materials that cannot be properly seen by the unaided eye. This site introduces you to the basics of microscopy, light and color, the anatomy of a microscope, and photomicrography. See the amazing photo gallery of DNA, amino acids, vitamins, and pesticides. The Silicon Zoo has some humorous images found on silicon chips. There are also Java tutorials on how different microscopes work. Excellent illustrations supplement the descriptions of many concepts. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"According to the overview, “The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) is an international work program designed to meet the needs of decision makers and the public for scientific information concerning the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and options for responding to those changes.” The first of several reports are complete, including “Living Beyond Our Means: Natural Assets and Human Well-being”, and the overall millennium report. In coming months, there will be specific reports on desertification, biodiversity, wetlands, and other topics. Powerpoint slides, zipped figures and tables, and PDF posters are found under Resources. Check out the different style houses of some posters depending on which language is used. The United Nations Environment Program, among other organizations, has sponsored this worldwide collaboration in the interest of learning the state of the world’s ecosystems. PDF versions of many documents are also available in Arabic, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Minerals and Metals of North America are highlighted at this site from Natural Resources Canada. Try your hand at gold mining by following the mining cycle from claim staking through operations to closure of site and its rehabilitation. Tour a kitchen, bathroom, and study to find what minerals and metals are found in a typical home and then take a quiz on what you learned. Career information and a glossary are included. The site is also available in French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Earth science students will want to bookmark this site for minerals that can be searched by name, by class, and by groupings (such as birthstones, gemstones, fluorescent minerals, and natural groupings). Each mineral profile provides information about physical characteristics, chemical name, common name, class, subclass, group, uses, and images. Be aware that the specimens are for sale, but you don’t need to make any purchases to dig out good information related to minerals at this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The purpose of this K-4 site, provided by Geography Education National Implementation Project and NASA, is to improve the quality of both science and geography education and literacy. Teaching fundamental spatial skills through the study of water, simple physical geography, and Earth as the home of humans, the site uses NASA data sets and images. The Paths Module, for K-4, investigates linkages among physical and human elements of the Earth system. The middle school modules feature Mars, remote sensing and volcanoes, while high school modules look at water resources and climate change.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You begin in the Milky Way at 10 million light years from the Earth. Each progressive power of 10 reduction in size takes you closer to the Earth, to an oak leaf and finally to a quark within a proton of the leaf. The tree branch is the actual size and in either direction you zoom in or out, there is an exponential notation equivalent as well as a unit of measurement. Meters expand out to kilometers and eventually light years, but the very small units of measure may be new to you: micrometers, nanometers, picometers, femtometers, and attometers. After being amazed at the large and small, look through the rest of the Molecular Expressions site for student activities, teacher resources, and tutorials on optics. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Dive into the dark and seemingly lifeless abyss. What is that light? A fish that lights up? Many of the fish living at the deepest part of the oceans create their own light with bioluminescent chemicals (think fireflies that glow). Many of them also have big sharp nasty teeth. You'll learn about more than a dozen deep sea creatures, bioluminescence, hydrothermal vents, and layers of the ocean. Check out the photo of the viper fish. Aren't you glad they don't come up toward the surface of the water where you are swimming?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Put on your virtual SCUBA gear, visit the E-Quarium at Monterey Bay! There are so many exhibits here you’ll wonder where to start, so be sure to take time to visit them all. Main attractions are the seahorse exhibit, habitats, and special focus sections on sea otters, penguins, octopus and their kin, and marine mammals. There are a wide variety of habitats loaded with images, videos, and activities, including the kelp forest, reefs, estuaries, rocky shores and open waters. The Learning Center has some fun games for kids and featured careers. Kids visiting the site alone might want to start in the E-Quarium Kids Guide. QuickTime 5 is required for movies. When you play the Crunch, Nibble, Gulp, Bite game in the Splash Zone, you can even hear the sound effects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"What happens at different wind speeds? Who is Beaufort and what does his scale mean? You’ll also learn about types of clouds, some tricks on how to read the sky for weather, and how air flows around mountains and buildings. There is a cool wind mapper activity using bubbles to track the wind in your yard, and an activity to test the Bernoulli Principle. With ShockWave, you can see how the Coriolis force works with virtual experiments."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Designed for high school physics students, the Multimedia Physics Studios consists of a collection of GIF animations and accompanying explanations of major physics concepts. The physics principles that are often difficult to imagine in a textbook are brought into action for visual presentation sure to enlighten! Clear descriptions of concepts or laws are presented along with animations and additional resources. Future plans are for interactive Shockwave animations."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Museum in the Classroom is an interesting model of collaboration between school districts and community organizations. In this case, the Illinois State Museum and the Brookfield Zoo teamed up to create a virtual museum space. Students participating in the project-created exhibits using the ISM and BZ collections; the projects are showcased on this site. Take a look! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour the gallery of more than thirty ancient inventions at the Smith College Museum of Science. The inventions include looms, weapons, calendars, furniture, and musical instruments. The objects shown aren’t ancient artifacts, but are reproductions made by university students who investigated how the objects were made and what they were used for. Citations are included for further research and many items include a description of how the models were made, including difficulties the students encountered while creating them. Dedicated secondary students might try their own reproductions of these objects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The University of California, Berkeley brings dinosaurs and other prehistoric organisms to your screen. Be prepared to spend time ""learning"" the layout of the site by clicking on the Navigation button, but it will be time well spent for the vast amount of information available on different researchers, epochs, plants and animals. If you are interested in a particular period in Earth's history, try the Geologic Time Machine. If your interest is a particular kind of organism, try the Web Lift to Taxa. There are digitized images from the collection, animated images, timelines, mystery fossils, and all you need to know to get started on phylogenetic systematics. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"For any student studying any of the body systems, this is a great place to begin. Many of the major body systems are covered: digestive, muscular, respiratory, and skeletal. Other body parts covered are nails, hair, and parts related to the senses. Graphics and vocabulary are geared to upper elementary and middle school students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Dryden Flight Research Center is NASA's primary installation for flight research. Projects at Dryden over the past 50 years have lead to major advancements in the design and capabilities of many civilian and military aircraft. The Gallery exhibits photos, movies and drawings of aircraft. The History of Flight covers inventors from Da Vinci, Cayley, Lilienthal, Chanute and Langley as well as the Wrights. If you think scramjets and sonic booms are cool, check out this site. Flash is required for some features. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Designed for elementary students, there are many flash games related to space science and flight at the NASA Kids Club. Activities are arranged by skill level, rather than by grade level. Click on the yellow mug for drawing and painting online, and the apple on the left is the teacher area, where resources are grouped by earth science, history, life science, physical science, math, space science, and technology. Non-readers will need someone to help with directions for games, as they are not narrated. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you ever wonder which of the many NASA sites had just what you were looking for? Look no further, this directory allows you to search by keyword, grade level, or topic to find appropriate curriculum support material from NASA and NASA funded projects. There is useful information for the first time user, a featured resource, and topics of the day arranged by elementary, middle school and high school levels. Adobe Acrobat is required to read some of the resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Learn how to send your name to Mars, see a student built satellite, or delve into the Education Page for even more fun."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Designed by scientists and educators, this site is a national program of five competitions for grades 3-12 linking students with NASA missions. This year's competitions are My Planet Earth, Aeronautics & Space Science Journalism, Watching Earth Change, Design a Mission to Mars, and Space Flight Opportunities. Each category has an educator's resource guide with instructional material, rubrics, tips, and resources. Note: deadlines are in January and February."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Education Strategies: Teaching Earth System Science is an excellent teaching resource provided by ICP (there's a prominent link to this from the homepage). This area of the site has a number of extensive learning modules focusing on different aspects of earth science. The modules give step-by-step instructions on learning and understanding the material, as well as lots of great diagrams that could easily be printed for class use."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Created by NASA to provide educational support and services to fully utilize the Internet as a basic tool for learning, The Quest Project includes great space information for students and teachers. The main attractions on this site are the sections concentrating on space scientists, space and the Wright Flyer, each of which includes lesson plans, activities and a schedule of interactive, online events. In addition, you'll find another section devoted entirely to women in space technology. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Visible Earth from NASA is a searchable directory of images, visualizations, and animations of the Earth. Major headings include agriculture, atmosphere, biosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, land surface, and oceans. The images have descriptions, where or how the image was created (space shuttle, Jet Propulsion Lab, Landsat). Click on Browse to see the wide variety of subjects housed at this site, it is a must stop for any class discussing weather, plate tectonics, and biomes. You can also browse by sensors or location. QuickTime is required for animations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"American Chemical Society sponsors National Chemistry Week, and in 2005 is from October 16-22 but you can have fun learning about this topic any time of the year. The theme is “The Joy of Toys” and this site has many activities with a science explanation of how the toy works. You can try these at home with commonly found toys like bouncing balls, bubbles, diving toys, fortune teller fish, magic ink, wall walkers, and silly putty. Go play! "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Here you will find everything you ever wanted to know about every tsunami that has ravaged the sea since 49 B.C.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"NETS is an initiative of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). The NSTE project's primary goal is to enable stakeholders in PreK-12 education to develop national standards for the educational uses of technology that will facilitate school improvement in the United States. Their site provides technology foundation standards for students, profiles for technology literate students, and scenarios providing a curricular context for the use of technology in classrooms. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"National Engineer's Week is held during February. Students, teachers, and librarians will find engineering resources including a future city contest, 50 ideas on ways to introduce engineering to students, and book suggestions. Breaking Through is a Flash movie exploring creativity related to engineering. Stop by and meet 50 different engineers to find out how they create new processes and inventions. Special projects are Introducing Girls to Engineering and a collaboration with PBS's ZOOM to involve students in grades 2-6 to engineering activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Online exhibits from the museum at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center include Naming the Vietnam Unknown, Medicine during the Civil War, and Combat Medicine in the Korean Conflict. You can explore the Anatifacts collection of medical oddities, Evolution of the Microscope, and Medical Instruments. The interactive components have games and you'll want to turn your sound on to enjoy the buzzing and cheering as you make your guesses. If you are a smoker, check out the smoker's lung alongside the healthy lung, you might reconsider your choice. Flash is required for some animations and interactive sections of the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This Kids page introduces you to Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, the two giant pandas at the National Zoo in Washington, DC. In addition to facts about pandas, there are games, puzzles, and a mask to make. Older students interested in animal behavior and veterinary science will enjoy the foraging experiment report, keeper notes, and the giant panda breeding program. Frequently Asked Questions are posted with answers. Depending on what time you access the site, you might even see them on the panda cams. For more Panda information, see http://www.sandiegozoo.org/special/pandas/, the San Diego Zoo Panda Central."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Natural Inquirer is an online journal for middle school students with articles related to trees, forests, wildlife, insects, and water. There are interviews with the scientists who conducted the research for the National Forest Service. Journal articles can be searched by national science standard, topics, or regions. Downloads are available in English and Spanish. There are a few games in the Kids Corner and the Teacher’s Place provides a manual and ideas for using the Natural Inquirer in the classroom. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Building a bridge to replace the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge that can withstand potential earthquakes is a remarkable feat of engineering. At this site, you’ll meet the people designing and building the bridge, find out the many types jobs associated with the project, and you can even try your hand at designing an earthquake proof bridge. Classroom activities are geared to middle school students. You can learn to talk in Bridgespeak using the glossary, a creep isn’t that unpleasant person who bugs you in the halls, it is the shortening of concrete stressed under heavy loads over time. Isn’t it amazing that over 300 million pounds of steel and 5,000 miles of half-inch steel strands in the tension cables will be used to build the new bridge? Maybe those engineers got their start building toothpick bridges too."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Updated throughout the day, NewScientist.com provides science news from a network of science and technology correspondents. Hot Topics is a guide to popular subjects in science like dinosaurs, mobile phones, and terrorist attacks in the United States. The section titled The Last Word is a set of interesting and often humorous answers to questions posed by readers, including why do we close our eyes when we sneeze and how do smoke detectors really detect smoke?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Nicenet is a nonprofit organization offering free Internet services. Here, teachers will find out how to set up free, online discussion boards for their classes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From Bill Arnett, software engineer with a special interest in astronomy. The Nine Planets is an overview of the history, mythology, and current scientific knowledge of each of the planets and moons in our solar system. Each page has text and images, some have sounds and movies, most provide references to additional related information. The full tour has over 60 pages, but you can also take the Express Tour of 10 pages. Also includes a glossary and pronunciation guide from the Web author. The site has updates from recent discoveries in our solar system."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site provides thermochemical, thermophysical, and ion energetics data compiled by NIST under the Standard Reference Data Program. Scroll past the credits to find the search for chemical names, formula, and chemical properties. Did you know there were 15 different sugars, all having the same chemical formula but different names and structures? Try a common formula such as C6H12O6 (sugar) to see the chemical name, chemical formula, and structure image if one is available. You can also search by molecular weight and other physical properties."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Special “albums” of photos related to the ocean are housed at the NOAA Photo Library. Dive into albums about undersea research, coral reefs, the NOAA fleet of ships, marine sanctuaries, America’s coastlines, and fisheries. Since these images are in the public domain, as long as you credit NOAA or the specific photographer, you can download images for school projects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Aquarius is an underwater ocean laboratory from NOAA, located in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Scientists live in Aquarius during ten-day missions and archives of missions are available from 2001 to the present. Each expedition has a mission summary, aquanaut profiles, expedition journals, and mission pictures. Expeditions have investigated coral, seaweed, sponges, and microorganisms. The lesson plans in PDF format were developed for grades 9-12 related to Life Sciences, Physical Science, Earth Science, Biology, and Chemistry. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Nobel Prize winners for Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, and Peace prizes are announced in early October. The Literature Prize is announced at a different time. You can read about Nobel laureates (previous winners) and read articles written by them. You can even tour the Nobel Forum in Sweden. QuickTime or Java are required for the tour."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Forbs, grasses and woodies? Forbs are herbs other than grasses. Did you know cattails were in the grass and grasslike plants? Woodies are trees, shrubs and woody vines. The Noble Foundation Plant Image Gallery is designed to assist students, botanists, ecologists, and natural resource managers with the identification of plants. Search by common name, scientific name, or family name."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History hosts a site with a searchable database of all living mammals of North America. You can search by a family tree, a species name, a map, and by conservation status. Some species have images of skulls that can be rotated to get a full view. Check out the fangs on the Lynx rufus, (Bobcat). If you have a project on mammals of the United States, check this site first. Macromedia Flash, QuickTime, and Adobe Acrobat Reader are required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) takes armchair ocean explorers on expeditions to underwater volcanoes, the Titanic wreckage, the USS Monitor, and the floor of the Arctic Ocean. The Technology section has photos of the various vessels, submersibles like Alvin, Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV), and other tools used in ocean exploration. The Gallery contains maps, photos, audio and videos. Videos are available in a variety of formats. There are over 100 standards-based lesson plans for grades 5-12. You can even download the content of the entire site onto a CD-ROM or request one to be mailed to you. The section about OceanAGE: Ocean Careers to Inspire Another Generation of Explorers, has profiles of people with cool jobs like being a marine ecologist. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Considering a career in marine science? Check the Students in Action and learn first hand what life is like at Marine field school. The Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre provides information about marine animals and their habitat.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Even if you don’t have the opportunity to see this film on a big screen, the companion Web site is brimming with photos and resources about the plants and animals found in Baja California. Species are listed by scientific name and common name, with details about the habitat, description, and natural history. Animals include fish, marine mammals, marine invertebrates, and terrestrial animals. Other topics include conservation and plate tectonics. A bibliography, glossary, and teacher guide with activities supplement the site. The site is also available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History has on online exhibit where you can tour the exhibit by topics like Sea People, Oceans in Peril, and Ocean Science. You can create your own tour or take a preplanned tour on biodiversity, women and the sea, oceans and Africa, or pollution. A special search area allows you to look for images and objects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"There are many women who choose careers in oceanography, how about you? Read interviews, view a photo gallery, and find out about jobs you might not have known existed. There is an illustrator of oceanographic data, a marine seismologist, and a chemical oceanographer. Each woman’s profile includes a sample schedule of her work week and what life is like on the ship. This is an exciting career, going out to sea to investigate ocean plants, animals, geology, chemistry, and geography. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"If you need to know almost anything about oceans, start at this JASON Education Project. Student topics include fisheries, weather, icebergs, coral reefs, waves, and currents. Information is presented in terms upper elementary students can easily understand. For older students, the online version of the textbook “Introduction to Physical Oceanography” can be downloaded in pdf format or viewed on html pages. Extra features are stunning photographs, an embedded glossary providing quick definitions, an interactive quiz, and real-time data. The section for educators includes a brief overview of oceanography topics and activities for the classroom."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is loaded with ocean facts. Still and animated illustrations demonstrate how water moves in tides, waves, and currents. Learn about different ocean habitats, marine mammals, ocean water, characteristic ocean zones, and research vessels like ALVIN. Check the site map for Quick Quizzes in each section. There are also experiments to demonstrate how boats float, how submarines dive, and how salt and freshwater differ."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The prairie once spread across 1.5 million square kilometers of the Great Plains but less than 2% of native prairie remains today. This site presents animals and plants of this ecosystem in the Field Guide of grasses, forbs (plants), birds, insects, mammals, and herps (reptiles and amphibians). In addition to the glossary, there is a Dakota language list of terms where you can hear pronunciations. A cool interactive game “Build a Prairie” is to restore either a tallgrass or shortgrass ecosystem. Your job is to pick the best combination of plants and animals for your particular prairie type. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is from a college level professor teaching introductory biology classes. They are a treasure trove of over fifty well-organized topics, which will help high school students looking for challenging biology materials. There are numerous charts, diagrams, photos, and illustrations to enhance the straightforward text. Complete citations, a glossary, and web links provide further reference materials. Learning objectives, terms and review questions are included in each chapter. This should be a web link to any high school biology course."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is an excellent example of technology and science integration. The American Museum of Natural History created this site for elementary school students to explore the wonders of nature. The site allows kids to observe and describe various plants and animals online, create their own field journals by examining a range of plants and animals in the community, and make 3-D paper models of real exhibits at the museum."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Optical Society of America hosts this site about optics, the science of light, designed for kids. There is a simulated laser lab, a feature on optics in nature including rainbows, investigating afterimages, and how optics can be used in biomedical research and practice. Optics careers are highlighted, and there is a Teachers’ and Parents’ Corner with lesson plans ranging from K-12 levels. Can you guess why a chameleon was chosen as the mascot of this site? Because it’s ability to change skin color is related to optics. Some sections of the site require PDF Reader, QuickTime, Flash, and Java."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour the Universe at this NASA site from the Jet Propulsion Lab. Major research areas are the emerging modern universe, stars and planets, and habitable planets and life. Current operational space missions include the Hubble, FUSE, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. There are earthbound observatories to investigate and future missions to look forward to. Visit the Library to see the Timeline of the Universe slide show which takes you from the Big Bang through element formation in stars, planetary system formation, forming Jupiter- and Earth-like planets, and chemistry of life. Don’t miss the other tutorials in the Library which cover searching for life in the universe, a primer on interferometry (which has a much higher resolution but in a smaller field of view than a telescope), and infrared astronomy. The tutorials are also available in PDF format to download. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Somewhere a body is discovered…. So what DO forensic scientists do? They are the people who carry out the scientific work in a criminal investigation. Getting job in this area is becoming more appealing, in large part due to the television shows related to forensics, and having a strong background in science is a must. This site is a good place to investigate the education and career options."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Owlie is the official mascot of the National Weather Service (NOAA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). He teachers about the hazards of severe weather, which includes tornadoes, lightning, hurricanes, flash floods, and winter storms. First, he provides a description of the dangerous weather and then tips about what to do in a variety of situations, such as if you are outside, in a house, or at school. Although not severe weather, there is also a useful section on carbon monoxide poisoning. The Owlie booklet is available in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Discover and explore how these asphalt ""tar pits"" formed, what types of plants and animals became trapped, and how scientists have used these fossil deposits to open a window into the world of prehistoric Los Angeles. Elementary age students will enjoy the story about Shasta, a wolf during the Ice Age who gets a little too close to the tar pits. Older students will be interested in the brain casts of a dire wolf, ground sloth, and sabertoothed cat, Smilodon. Pit 91 describes excavation techniques and lists some of the findings of past digs. The Exploration Guide features the La Brea geology, flora, fauna, and human excavations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You may have made paper in school or camp out of recycled materials, but how about out of daffodils, sea grass, and barrel cactus? These three-dimensional images let you see not just surface features, but often all the way through the sheet. It is almost like you could walk INTO the fibers. You’ll find information about papermaking and microscopy. Many of the images have both traditional 2-D images and also a 3-D version. To view the 3-D version requires red-blue anaglyph glasses, which you can make with red and blue cellophane and the template on the site. Follow the detailed instructions in the Cookbook for paper making."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You have probably heard of quarks, but how about gluons, kaons, and leptons? This engaging site allows you to explore the world of fundamental particles and forces and then to investigate the experimental evidence and techniques. Following the main path of the site takes you through some questions including: What is fundamental? What is the world made of? What holds it together? How do we know any of this? A glossary is available. A brief history of particle physics is available in English and Spanish. Javascript and Macromedia Flash are required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you know that 10 million students in the US attend community colleges? Funded by the National Science Foundation and the American Association of Community Colleges, Pathways to Technology highlights technology degree programs at community colleges. The featured occupations present common jobs in each field, the kind of work involved, and the skills and degree required. Examples are information technology, transportation, engineering, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. Financial aid and application to community colleges are provided, making this a good place for high school students to visit if they are thinking about a career in technology but weren’t planning to go to a four year college. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The American Chemical Society has created a slick periodic table that provides more information than most online tables. View by group (alkali metals, halogens, noble gasses, etc.), element, electron configuration, and a variety of properties. The property displays give clear images of where each element falls on a chart of electronegativity, atomic radius, melting point, boiling point, and several other properties. For example, you can select to see the elements electronegativity and if viewing with the halogen benchmarks, note that the halogens are the peak for highest electronegativities. This type of display is useful for understanding group properties. Another feature is to click on the red button for each element data and find 16 specific values. This periodic table appears courtesy of W. H. Freeman Inc., publisher of Chemistry in the Community. Shockwave is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Hey comic book fans, brush up on basic chemistry facts with this chemical comic book from the University of Kentucky’s Chemistry Department. Click on an element to see a list of comic book pages involving that element. Gold, for example, features 21 images from Richie Rich to Metal Man to the Essential Showcase. Full citations to the comic books accompany each example and many have details about the use of the element in the story. The chemical information provided for each element is minimal, just the atomic number, symbol, and atomic weight, but clicking on those icons will take you to WebElements, which is loaded with facts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From Los Alamos National Lab
A Resource for Elementary, Middle School, and High School Students which provides chemical information including uses, sources, and history of elements. Added features of the site are the ability to search by keyword, a section on how to use the periodic table, and a short glossary titled Nutshell Chemistry."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Why do pests like wasps, mice, ticks, roaches, and other creepy crawlies like our houses so much? They don’t set out to be pests, they are just doing their job of survival, and have found that living with or near humans is beneficial. Some pests are just annoying but some can cause damage to the house or make you sick. Four learning games for upper elementary students let you be a pest detective or a pest ranger to solve a puzzle. The teacher section has lesson plans, game cards, and coloring pages for primary and intermediate grades."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Franklin Institute presents ""Pieces of Science,"" an online gallery of sixteen educational resources related to a collection of historical science objects. Objects include Ben Franklin’s lightning rod, daguerreotype cameras, the lunar module, and Joseph Priestley’s static machine. Each object includes a description, images, teacher resources, and sometimes a quiz or activities. The objects are geared for primary through secondary students. Since teachers are the intended audience, the “Pieces of Science” resources have been mapped to the U.S. National Science Education Standards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Even if you can’t be mushing alongside, you can follow these 31 polar huskies and an international team of six educators and explorers on their Exploration of Nunavut. The event began in December 2003 and should end in June 2004. The mission is to document arctic climate change, meet Inuit Elders and students, and explore traditional ecological knowledge in the remote communities they travel through. Different portals are for teachers and students, the public, and sponsors. Visit the kennel and meet the entire dog team. Teacher materials are available. QuickTime is required to view the videos. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Canadian nonprofit Media Awareness Network in conjunction with the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College provide an interactive Internet safety games: Privacy Playground: The First Adventure of the Three Little CyberPigs (for ages 7-9) where students learn about online marketing, and about protecting their privacy as they surf the Internet. CyberSense and Nonsense: The Second Adventure of the Three CyberPigs (for ages 9-11) where children explore the world of chat rooms and learn to distinguish between fact and fiction, and to detect bias and harmful stereotyping in online content. Jo Cool or Jo Fool (for grades 6 – 8), an online game takes students through a series of mock sites that test their savvy surfing skills. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Project Exploration was founded by a University of Chicago paleontologist and an educator, to make science accessible to the public with a special focus on city kids and girls. Visit the Mesozoic Garden to see SuperCroc, watch how the dinosaur Jobaria is excavated and reconstructed, and learn about being a paleontologist at the Bone Digger’s Special. This is a cool site full of great images and information for dinosaur lovers. Discoveries are up to date with the most recent dinosaur species found in India, Rajasaurus. The teacher section has activities geared to middle school standards. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Project Seahorse is a team of biologists and social workers committed to conserving and managing seahorses, their relatives, and their habitats while respecting human needs. Information on seahorses is provided, including frequently asked questions as well as information about conservation issues. Did you know that in seahorses, only the male becomes pregnant? Learn more about this fascinating role-reversal at this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This Fermilab site is devoted to quarks, neutrinos, and other subatomic particles, such as ""sparticles"" which are thought to be mirror images of regular particles. Visitors will find a chart listing all six quarks, their date of discovery, and who discovered it. In addition, the site provides information about lab personnel, the lab itself and its grounds, quizzes, puzzles, related cancer research, and more."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Stop by this site from the Rainforest Action Network for rainforest information for kids. The section “About Rainforests” has illustrated fact sheets with a glossary, a photo slide show, information about old growth forests, and an interactive map of tropical, temperate and boreal forests. Play a game to help Sally Salmon evade oil spills, over-fishing, dams, bears, and clear cutting of forests as she tries to swim upstream. Teacher resources include a curriculum guide and lesson plans. The video requires QuickTime or Real Player and Sally’s game requires Flash. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Dozens of science related careers are introduced here, and each includes a short description of what the job entails, some tips for what to do if you are interested in pursuing that career, and some book suggestions. There are images and quotes from many men and women portrayed in these careers ranging from ichthyology, geology, engineering, and many other physical, environmental and biological sciences."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"On April 28, 2005, one of the most exciting announcements in ornithology in decades was made. The Ivory-Billed Woodpecker, thought to be extinct the past 60 years, has been sighted and filmed in bottomland swamp forest in Arkansas. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology was one of the main research groups and they have created a site to share the excitement with the rest of us. There is video footage of the recent sighting and of one in 1935. Find photos, interviews, behind the scenes with the staff, and a free link to the profile of the Ivory-bill from The Birds of North America Online. You can download the full text article published in Science magazine in PDF. QuickTime is required for the videos."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site is managed by the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. There is an extensive glossary, details about photovoltaics, and energy tidbits and pointers to information about biomass, geothermal, solar, and wind energy. A useful conversion chart will aid in converting kilowatt-hours into megajoules, BTUs, Langleys, and calories. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"As a rocket scientist, select a Delta II, Atlas V, or Pegasus rocket to design. You’ll design the booster, fairing (a separation system which protects the payload), and spacecraft. You’ll assemble the components for each rocket, then simulate a flight profile to see how it would launch, jettison the solid rockets, fairings, and eventually have spacecraft separation. The Flash version has cool animations, but if you click on the low bandwidth version, you can see the text with descriptions of each component and what function it has. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Follow Roofus, the energy wise golden retriever around his house to learn about energy conservation and solar energy. Roofus has some activities in his back yard including a word search, instructions on how to build a solar oven from a pizza box, building a sun dial, and coloring a picture of Roofus. The site from the U.S. Department of Energy is intended for elementary students but there are also lesson plans available for K-12. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you know that Americans create approximately 5 pounds of garbage a day? This site from the Association of Science Technology Centers and the Smithsonian Institution talk trash.about trash at your home, your school, and your community. You'll explore issues surrounding municipal solid waste and see recommendations for businesses and consumers on how to cut down on garbage. You'll find out more about how nature recycles and that there really is no ""away"", that burying, burning, and recycling garbage doesn't really get rid of it. There are lots of activities scattered throughout this site for students to at home or in class."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Science is everywhere you look! Click on any of the illustrations on the main page and you will be taken to a section of the Agricultural Research Service. Sci4Kids is a series of stories about what scientists do and is geared to kids about 8 to13 years old. Science, agriculture, and computing careers are among those presented, demonstrating that science is a part of our daily lives. An added feature is that much of the site content is available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Dig deeper into science headlines. The Science Museum of Minnesota hosts a news and blog about science discoveries and what they may mean to you. They would like us all to be better consumers of science information, and are supported by the National Science Foundation. Recent features have been avian flu, hurricane science, and global climate change. Permanent features are the Scientist on the Spot, where scientists in a wide range of fields talk about their work and answer some questions from readers. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you ever think about how scientific processes work when you prepare food? This site from the Exploratorium investigates the science of cooking eggs, bread, and meat and preparing pickles, candy, and seasonings. Each type of food includes kitchen lab activities and recipes, a special feature such as visiting an organic egg farm, and a section on the science behind cooking that food. Archived monthly features whet your appetite for food trivia like why baking at higher altitudes is different from lower levels, and why you get a bang out of beans. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Museum of American History provides images and original captions as they appeared in period publications. Most of the images are related to electricity but other subjects include automobiles, cameras, telephones and televisions. Check the text and images under Electric Appliances, such as the electric blanket and blackboard lecture or the 1962 picture-phone under telephones. The captions are fascinating as the modern reader sees the descriptions of innovations that are now commonplace. The next generation will think our recent innovations are as ancient as you might think these inventions of the 1930s-1960s are."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Science Snacks are miniature versions of some of the most popular exhibits at the Exploratorium in San Franscico. Over one hundred activities are presented, which include materials needed, assembly of the experiment, an activity, and leading questions about what is happening. Further information is found in ""etcetera."" Topics of the experiments are light and color, fluids, perceptions, force and motion, and energy and matter. These experiments are best for middle and high school students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Science Year site from the UK is designed for middle and high school students and their teachers. It’s about raising awareness of science and technology subjects and careers, such as forensics, environment, medicine, and architecture. The Wired section is the lighter side of science, including quizzes and games. The section titled Out There provides spotlights of science in the everyday world related to astronomy, engineering, and sports. It also includes a Parents Pack of activities for young scientists and a Sci-Teach area for teachers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"NOAA and NASA bring you a site about weather, ranging from what to do for a science fair project related to weather, how to make a weather satellite, understanding Earth’s orbit, to viewing clips of severe weather events. There is a downloadable 2006 calendar with significant weather events from the past. What happened on YOUR birthday? There are activities and images for use in the classroom in the Educator section. Membership is free, if you want to create a profile with the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Scorecard uses scientific and government data to provide an up-to-date and extensive collection of environmental information available on the Web. You can type in your zip code to find out about local air pollution and local Superfund sites. Topics covered include toxic releases by manufacturers, hazardous air pollutants and animal waste. A glossary is provided. Profiles provide detailed information on more than 6,800 chemicals, including all the chemicals regulated under major environmental laws. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Explorations section of the Scripps site will take you to volcanoes in Costa Rica, allow you to view glowing blue algae, and scuba diving for medicinal compounds from a coral reef. The Education Corner introduces you to nudibranchs, beautiful and sometimes poisonous invertebrates. FLIP is Scripps Floating Instrument Platform that houses scientists doing research in the ocean. Check out the animation of how this this amazing research lab operates. With QuickTime you can hear interviews with scientists on board. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"In the spring of 2004, a team of biologists retraced the 1940 expedition around Baja California made by John Steinbeck and Edward F. Ricketts to survey invertebrate fauna in the same intertidal sites. Compare what Steinbeck and Ricketts wrote in ""Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research"" with the Log of the 2004 trip. Some of the invertebrates found in abundance on this trip were jumbo squid, anemones, snails, sponges, brittle stars, and planaria."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"High school teachers can use 50 video segments and accompanying lesson plans to teach genetic research in the classroom. Most video segments are just under 10 minutes and cover a range of topics including cancer, gender determination, cloning, forensics, genetic engineering, and many health related issues. Videos can be downloaded or streamed using Real Player. Lesson plans can be downloaded in Word for further editing or in PDF format to use the site’s created lesson."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ace on the Case: Secrets@Sea is a curriculum-based adventure story with ocean-related learning activities for grade 4-7 students. The teacher’s guide includes learning outcomes and extension activities. Some of the themes include marine mammals and food webs, tides, currents, and the ocean floor. A comprehensive Field Guide is available throughout the game to provide additional information about concepts and vocabulary used in the game. Navigation can be a bit confusing, but is worth pursuing. An inexpensive CD-ROM version with enhanced capabilities is available through the site. Shockwave Flash3 is required for this site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Interact with the numerous activities at the Exploratorium related to light and how the eye interprets images. The Disappearing Act is a really interesting example of camouflage. Try the optical illusion exhibits to move ""bricks"" to see how your eyes distort reality, and how other patterns result in errors in perception. Pay attention to the images on the left side of your screen, see if you can detect any changes. Flash is required for most of the activities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"What in the world does coffee have to do with birds? Plenty, according to the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. Shade grown coffee plantations play a key role in the conservation of migratory birds that have found a sanctuary in their forest-like environment. There is a fact sheet describing the relationship between migratory birds and shade grown coffee. The online slide show goes into detail about growing and harvesting coffee beans. Shade coffee beans ripen more slowly, resulting in a richer flavor. So, the next time you order a latte, ask about shade grown coffee. Some resources are available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This SeaWorld site examines shark biology, behavior, diet, reproduction, hydrodynamics, and lifespan. Books for young readers are also listed. If you have Flash, take a tour of shark anatomy. A classroom activity for middle grades is included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Discovery spent two weeks in space in July and August 2005, where the under Commander Eileen Collins, the crew demonstrated new methods to inspect and repair the Shuttle in orbit. This was the first flight of the shuttle since the loss of Columbia and crew in 2003. Explore the successful flight of STS-114 through the video and image galleries and a Flash presentation about the shuttle system, mission overview, and crew profiles. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site can serve as an introduction to simple machines but also for older students learning about the formulas for mechanical advantage. Once you have an introduction to the wedge, screw, inclined plane, and other simple machines, try to find the six simple machines that are found on the lawn mower to see how they work together. Next, use what you have learned to put together a tree house with the simple machines. The site requires Flash for all components. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Take the Web Walk around Manhattan to learn about some of the tallest buildings in the country. Check out the Cool Stuff for Kids for an activity called “Don’t Know Squat About Skyscrapers?” where you’ll find out about the tallest and biggest buildings and see Manhattan through Time. Check past exhibitions for topics including Green Towers and several World Trade Center exhibits. Lesson plans and activities are found in the Educator section. Flash is required.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Meet the squamates. Is that word new to you? It refers to animals with scales, which include lizards, geckos, and legless lizards, which we usually call snakes. Squamates have been on earth for about 200 million years. As you click through the site, don’t be startled by movement or sounds. Fortunately, the puff adder and the rattlesnake can’t really strike you. Watch the water monitor on the WebCam, listen to the barking gecko, and distinguish between different rattlesnake sounds. Sound clips and videos require RealPlayer and QuickTime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Is it true that no two snowflakes are alike? According to this site about snow crystals, yes. Even Johannes Kepler wondered why snowflakes had six points. What Kepler couldn’t know yet was that some flakes have twelve points, some are triangular, and others are shaped like pyramids, bullets, and arrowheads. This site from a Caltech physicist is about the physics of crystal growth. While you need a solid background in physics to understand the crystal growth, you don’t have to be a physics student to appreciate the stunning photographs of snowflakes found here. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Bubbles are the main attraction at this site. You’ll find recipes, games, experiments, and other bubbleology ideas. If you ever wondered how long soap has been used by humans, the chemistry of soap and detergent, or how it is manufactured, this is the site to find that information. Recycling, environmental issues, and food safety cleaning tips are also on the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A fun site that will appeal to older students studying physics and movement, you can either play with existing models or create your own. What are they? The creations look like soda straw constructions that use masses, springs, and muscles to exhibit friction, movement, gravity, and spring stiffness. Helpful instructions on how to build your own walk you through the process of building stable models. You can even save your creations and send them to friends. Java Virtual Machine is required to use and view the creations. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Get the dirt on dirt at this site about the different types of soil. Did you know that there are 12 categories of soil? Look at the descriptions and see what you think the dirt is under your feet where you live. You’ll find information and images about the location, properties, ecological significance, and use of these 12 soil orders. Not sure how to teach about soil? The education section has ten key messages about soil in PDF and PowerPoint format. There are many careers related to soil study and management described here also. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Sponsored by Solar Cookers International, this site includes plans for building your own solar oven. Many plans are available in languages other than English, such as Spanish, Arabic, and Portuguese. The site archives Frequently Asked Questions, provides links to many other resources on solar cooking, lists international organizations, and highlights news of how solar cookers are successful in third world countries."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Image Gallery from Space Imaging has amazing satellite photos of before and after images from natural disasters (Hurricanes Rita and Katrina) and the 2004 tsunami. The photo gallery of Ancient Observatories offer images and short descriptions of sites like Abu Simbal, Angor Wat, Chichen Itza, and Machu Piccu. Other series of satellite images are about California wildfires, Mars, Mount Everest, and the Iraq war. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"SIRTF, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, will be launched into space by a Delta rocket from the Kennedy Space Center on January 9, 2003. During its 2.5-year mission, SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space that are unable to be seen from Earth. Infrared light allows images to be made of the clouds and dust in space. This site from the Jet Propulsion Lab in California provides infrared and multiwavelength tutorials. Fun games and videos are found on the main site. Don’t miss the SIRTF Kidszone for younger students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Space Place from NASA provides over 20 games, projects, and puzzles to try related to planets, space travel, and other solar system topics. The cool (or hot) infrared photo album lets you swap a regular camera for one that shows infrared images. Check out the hair dryer and the one titled “footprints”. Some of these games are for younger students, but some require some advanced reasoning skills and would be good for middle students. Also available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"On February 1, 2003, we lost the 7 crew members aboard the space shuttle Columbia. This 16-day mission was dedicated to research in physical, life, and space sciences, conducted in approximately 80 separate experiments, including experiments from students such as ant behavior in space. This NASA site is the portal to information about the mission, the astronauts, the tragedy, and the investigation into what went wrong and caused the shuttle to break apart upon re-entry. Images and reports of the investigation are updated frequently."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This exhibit explores the microscopic world inside rocks. The photomicrographs on this site reflect the variety of minerals and structures found in rocks. The photos are thin slices of rock viewed through a polarizing microscope. Each display includes a color photo, a description of the rock type and where it was found, and an outline drawing labeled with mineral names. The Exploring Rocks section is a primer for identifying rocks and how they were formed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Ever thought of a career searching for microbes? There are more microbes on a person's hand than there are people on the entire planet! Join Sam Sleuth as he solves microbe mysteries such as what microbes are, where they are found, how they can be helpful or harmful, and how we can use them to work for us. There are a handful of experiments to try for yourself. After looking at some of the images on this site, maybe you’ll spend more time washing your hands. This site is also available in Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This in-depth site from CNN highlights the issues, the science, and the politics of stem cell research. There is a Flash animation explaining how embryonic stem cells are extracted and then developed into different types of tissue. Stem cells have the potential to develop into any type of body cell and might be able to replace damaged cells in a person’s body such as Christopher Reeve’s spinal cord cells. At the heart of the debate is the use of embryos for research into treating debilitating diseases, requiring the destruction of the embryo after extracting the stem cells. Explore the site and decide where you stand on the issue. Video clips can be viewed in Quicktime, RealPlayer, or Windows Media. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Material science, its all about “stuff.” Most materials are either metals, ceramics, semiconductors, polymers, composites, biomaterials, and even weird stuff like buckyballs and aerogels. Four major things material scientists study are structure, processing, properties, and performance, and you can participate by trying some experiments to investigate these at home or school. Family guides are available in English and Spanish. Teacher guides are geared for middle school grades. Curriculum connections are tied to National Science Education Standards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Are you wondering who Sue is? She was the world's largest Tyrannosaurus rex and her remains are being prepared for an exhibit at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. Here you can find background on Sue, how dinosaur fossils are preserved and the ins and outs of the world of the T-Rex. Also, find great crossword puzzles, games and activities for students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Meet Sue, the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found. She is assembled at the Field Museum in Chicago, and if you can’t go visit her in person, drop in on the online Sue exhibit. You’ll learn how Sue was prepared and mounted in the museum, some facts and speculations about her, tour an image gallery, and see her enormous skull. With QuickTime, you can view a CT scan of her skull, which is too heavy to mount on the exhibit with the rest of her skeleton. A Kids section of the site where you can download a crossword puzzle, word search, and images to make a flip book of Sue running. Aren’t you glad she isn’t running after you? Adobe Acrobat is required for the puzzles."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"After viewing the opening animation, click on the burrow to enter the site. National Geographic introduces you to eight of the hundreds of species of tarantulas. This site also describes the tarantula's anatomy and lifecycle. Included in the Resources section are further readings and lesson plan ideas. Learn how these spiders poison their prey, liquefy the tissue, and suck the victim dry. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site sponsored by the National Science Digital Library introduces students to the everyday application of science, mathematics, technology and engineering in our world using inquiry based lessons. There are two Living Labs, one about public transportation and the other about water engineering. Both require students to use real data accessed from the site in the activities. There are also many curricular units, lessons, and activities provided, all listing grade level and most with Colorado or McREL standards. Java is required for some of the data in the Fastracks Lab. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Teachers can create charts for science fairs, behavior, language arts skills, homework and more. Fill in the appropriate information and generate a printable chart. (Some commerce on this site.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"There are many activities about trees for elementary and middle school students. “The Life of a Forest” has section about how tree rings can tell the life story of a tree, the anatomy of a tree, and a timeline of a seedling’s growth into a tree. “What Tree is That?” is an animation to help you learn to identify trees by certain characteristics. There are many other games and classroom handouts. Some activities require Flash or Adobe Acrobat Reader. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"What do you do with used tea bags? This site from the Tea Council of the United Kingdom has two modules, Bio Exploration which focuses on the human body, health and safety, and an Ecology module focusing on where tea comes from and forest conservation. A Kids Console takes you directly to the activities, there is a glossary, and a carbon calculator enables students to enter data for trash output, utility bills (in British pounds, not dollars), distance driven in a car, bus or train, and how much carbon that would equal, and then calculates the cost in numbers of trees each year. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"In July 2005, the Pew Internet and American Life Project published a report titled “Teens and Technology: Youth are leading the transition to a fully wired and mobile nation.” Some of the major findings are that 87% of teens are online users and half of those are online daily. Instant messenging is preferred to email. While most access the Web from home, 54% have gone online from a library and 78% have gone online from school. And a finding sure to make school librarians proud: Older girls are power communicators and information seekers. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Edison was an amazing man, obtaining 1,093 U.S. patents, his first at the age of 21. He filed an estimated 500-600 unsuccessful or abandoned applications as well. This site from Rutgers University allows you to search the patents and see his original drawings and applications. They are grouped according to subject: batteries, electric light and power, phonographs and sound recordings, cement, mining and ore milling, motion pictures, telegraphy and telephony. There is also biographical information and newspaper and magazine clippings starting in the mid 1870s. One of the sample documents is a list of possible names for what became the phonograph (record player, for readers who remember what records are). Just think. We might be calling it an acoustophone."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Often referred to as the Tasmanian “tiger” or Tasmanian “wolf”, the Thylacine was an Australian marsupial. Check out the images of the skull and use the magnifying glass to rollover a section you’d like to see enlarged. There is also a grey wolf skull for comparison. Five films (Java applets) show footage of a thylacine in captivity. There are many images and information about the natural history of this possibly extinct animal. The last captive thylacine died in 1936;the species is now thought to be extinct, although there were reported sightings in the wild during the 1960s and 1970s. Sections of the site require a Java enabled browser."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"There are online exhibits, articles, and interviews from the Exploratorium that demonstrate how cells divide, how genes adapt and mutate, and how embryos grow. You can see how zebrafish and chicken embryos develop in time lapsed videos. The Cell Explorer animates an animal cell, cell division, how cells make proteins, and how we get energy from the food we eat. The squeamish should not watch the beetles feasting on the body of a dead mouse or sparrow in the “Energy from Death” clip, but be glad you don’t see the images of the human Body Farm where you can learn a bit about forensic anthropology. Online exhibits require Flash, pdf and QuickTime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"June 2004 is a perfect time for investigating this site because it will be the first time in over a hundred years that the transit occurs. This year, the Venus Transit occurs on June 8. The Venus Transit helped astronomers determine the scale of the solar system. The prediction of the passage (transit) of Venus across the face of the Sun was the key to deriving the distance to the Sun, the ""Astronomical Unit"" or AU. There is an educator’s guide for the astronomy section. Other sections of this site include Captain Cook’s Explorations and Waka Voyaging Section dealing with Polynesian and Maori ocean voyaging in the Pacific. If you miss this transit, you can catch the next one in 2012, but after that, it will be in 2117. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Tree of Life site began as a site for biologists and expanded to a more general audience including middle and high school students interested in biodiversity and the phylogeny (evolutionary history) that generated it. Click on the area for Learners and find “treehouses” for the K-16 audience. The treehouse is a resource created by an educator or scientist with investigations, stories, art, games, and teacher resources on a particular topic such as mammals, predator vs. prey, or insects. The tree layout begins with the roots of single cell organisms and branching out to different taxons, to specific species or you can browse by plant or animal family. Why don’t you contribute a treehouse you have built?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

This site will ask you questions to help you narrow choices and identify trees in the Eastern and Central United States. There is an index that will take you to the page where an illustration of the particular species is shown. You can use the index with the common names or Latin classification. Definitions of certain arboriculture terms can be found in a glossary. This is a great resource for students working on a tree identification project.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Using data from the National Hurricane Center, this viewer is an interactive track of every Atlantic Tropical Cyclone and Hurricane from 1950 to 1999. You can view a specific hurricane or select by year or you can view a special list of history's more popular and damaging hurricanes. Display the path the hurricane took and view wind speed in knots (100 knots equals approximately 115 miles per hour). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Try Science brings you field trips, adventures, and experiments from a variety of science centers around the world and is hosted by the New York Hall of Science. Field trips and web cams allow you to visit different science museums in the United States. There are more than 30 experiments to view, complete with materials and instructions. You’ll find experiments related to earth sciences, biology, math, physical sciences, technology, space, chemistry, social sciences, and medicine. Parts of the site are also available in French, Spanish, German, Italian, and Portuguese."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The tsunami textbooks are divided into four levels for primary, elementary, middle and high school students. Each text book has its own teacher guide. Since there are no copyrights to these textbooks, you can download them for distribution in class. The text is available in PDF format in English and in Spanish. Since the original text was Spanish, there are a few errors in English, but the content from the Departamento de Oceanografía, Programa de Geofísica Marina in Chile is accurate. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"NOAA’s site about tsunamis explains what they are and how they form, hosts animations, maps, and other resources. There are multiple links to other NOAA sites about tsunamis, including current information about the Indian Ocean tsunami from December 26, 2004, a tsunami events database, and the Tsunami Research Program. The “Tsunami Great Waves” is a 12 page brochure which can be download or viewed online in English, Spanish or French. It provides information on what a tsunami is, how fast and how big they can be, what causes them, and more. The direct link for that publication is: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/pr/itic/library/pubs/great_waves/tsunami_great_waves.html "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Did you know that the four warmest years on record since 1860 have all occurred since 1990? The Global Change Research Information Office serves as a clearinghouse for documents and publications that pertain to global environmental change research, adaptation strategies, and resources for K-12 students. Before you send in your own question, check out the responses to frequently asked questions in the Global Change Resources section and the archive of previously asked questions for Ask Dr. Global Change. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The two divisions of this site are for students and teachers. The Evolution 101 area for students addresses speciation, micro and macroevolution, as well as patterns and mechanisms of evolution. The student section also provides topics including the nature of science, history of evolutionary thought, misconceptions, and evidence. There are quizzes for each of the major topics. Teachers will find resources on lesson concepts, and suggestions for avoiding pitfalls and roadblocks they might encounter as they teach about evolution. Some of these problems include terminology confusion, using ineffective and possibly inappropriate activities, and not keeping up with new discoveries. A glossary supplements the content on the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Understandings of Consequence Project “aims to help students learn difficult science concepts by engaging them in how scientists think about the underlying causality.” The curriculum modules are density, ecosystems, pressure, and simple circuits. The types of causal understanding this site addresses are mechanism, pattern, co-variation of causes and effects, and agency. The materials are downloadable for free, and include more than just lesson plans. Teachers should take the time to become familiar with the goals of each lesson, to help guide the students in not just the HOW but WHY of science. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Union of Concerned Scientists is coalition of citizens and scientists focusing on a healthy environment and a safer world. Major topics at the site are global warming, vehicles, clean energy, invasive species, global security, food safety, and scientific integrity. For most topics, there is a searchable database of facts that represent the most current research, called “Just the Facts”. Many topics present corporate and government solutions as well as things you can do to help make the environment healthier. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This site offers a treasure trove of online activities and classroom lessons for science teachers grades K-12. Among the topics covered are caves, maps, geologic age, fossils, volcanoes and fault lines. Not to be missed!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Twinkle Lights are for grades K-6 where you'll find stories, puzzles, games, a photo gallery and a history of the US Patent and Trademark Office. The Bright Lights section is for students in grades 6-12 with directions for a patent search, career information, and how to read the Mumbo Jumbo ""legalese"" terms found in patents. Older students will also find games and interesting points to ponder. The Guiding Lights section is for parents and teachers. Did you know that Owings-Corning was able to trademark the color pink for its insulation? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"This collection of interactive JAVA applets will be useful in physics, earth and space science classes, and environmental science courses. Major topics covered in this website include astrophysics, thermodynamics, mechanics, energy and environment. Being able to see animations of Newton’s and Kepler’s Laws would help students understand the concepts introduced in class. There are also some JAVA based tools that can be helpful for students in making graphs, figures or spreadsheets. You may need to turn off pop-up blockers to access the applets."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The University of New South Wales in Australia hosts a site about embryonic development from conception through the first eight weeks of development. Information about Carnegie stages, system notes, development notes, and embryos other than human are also covered. While the information at this site is suited to older students, there is also a section for younger students to explain embryological growth in understandable terms. Quicktime is required for movies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The United States Geological Survey provides multiple maps giving the user the ability to select features of agriculture, biology, geography, geology, hydrography, industry, natural hazards, coastal and marine, and a wide range of power plant types. You can layer multiple selections such as plotting nuclear power plants in relation to recent hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanoes. Take time to learn how to use the site, it will be worth your time. The site can be viewed in HTML or JAVA versions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Did you know that baby rattlesnakes produce venom before they are one full day old? Don't worry too much about poisonous snakes because lightning causes more deaths in the U.S. than all venomous animals combined. The California Academy of Sciences show us the beauty of venomous animals, and how they inject their toxins by stabbing with a tail, chewing with teeth, biting with fangs, and other charming methods of spearing victims. Venoms 101 gives an overview of these creatures. Striking Diversity points out that not only insects and reptiles can be venomous, but invertebrates and mammals can be also. Toxic Cocktails briefly discusses neurotoxins, hemotoxins, and cardiotoxins. Deadly Beauties introduces you to four of the most toxic animals.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Let’s go spelunkers, get ready to explore various types of caves from the comfort of your home or school. A long time caver hosts this site featuring four distinct types of caves: solution, lava tube, sea, and erosional caves. Natural forces created each type, from limestone dissolved by acidic water, to lava, to water, and wind. If you thought formations were limited to stalactites and stalagmites, you’ll be surprised with the amazing variety of formations are found in caves. The photos and explanations of how the formations were created are detailed and may tempt you to seek out your local caving organization so you can see these formations for yourself. Remember, never explore a cave without an experienced team of cavers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Virtual Field Trips Web site provides online field trips focused on particular phenomena or habitats. The VFT team develops virtual tours of subject-related Web sites in response to teacher proposals. Each tour assembles resources from all over the Web and provides context through pre-trip activities, lesson plans, and commentary on each site included in the tour. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Explore the natural and human history of Ecuador and the Galpagos. This site records a 1996 TerraQuest journey and includes an interactive atlas, geology, history, wildlife, discussion of ecological issues, dispatches, photos, QuickTime VR gallery, and a K-12 education workbook."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"“SimuLab” topics include states of matter, ideal and real gases, heat and motion, phase transitions, macromolecules, and water. These are project based hands-on activities for high school science students which “enables the student to visualize atomic motion, manipulate atomic interactions, and quantitatively investigate the resulting macroscopic properties of biological, chemical, and physical systems.” The software tools used are available free from the site. The site is also available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine presents over 40 hands on activities in the following topics: land topography, ocean bathymetry, coastal tides, ocean buoy data, ocean temperature, weather and climate, and watersheds and rivers. Each topic has background information, key questions, key terms, movies and images, web links, and hands-on activities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"These dozen virtual wonders from the Natural History Museum in London are images you can manipulate by rotating them for a close view from all angles. Images include a fossil ammonite, Anomalocaris, a bizarre early sea creature, an Archaeopteryx skull, meteorite fragments, and three strangely shaped trilobites. Manipulations require Flash. Each specimen has detailed information. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Library of Medicine has created a site about forensic medicine. Not for the squeamish, this site delves into autopsies, anatomical specimens, and body decomposition. There are 15 forensic cases presented for your investigation, biographies of people who were instrumental in developing processes such as fingerprint identification and toxicology, and other technologies of forensic medicine. Three online activities and three lesson plans introduce forensic medicine, anthropology, technology, and history. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"A ThinkQuest award winner, this site was created by students and designed to educate other students about volcanoes. It delves into many different facets of volcanoes such as what a volcano is, how they are formed, and how eruptions effect each and every one of us. Visitors may test their knowledge of volcanoes with online games and multiple-choice quizzes, search a 'volcano' database and discover links to other volcano sites, book titles and magazine articles for further research. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"From the University of North Dakota
The best resource for volcano information on the Web! There is a Kids' Door for younger students, but most of the site is great for all ages. Find out about currently erupting volcanoes, take a virtual field trip, read an interview with a volcanologist, and read the archives of an outstanding Ask a Volcanologist question and answer service."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"How do votes actually get counted? This site from the Smithsonian Museum of American History describes how ballots and voting systems have evolved over the years from paper ballots, gears and lever voting machines, and computer touch screens. One theme covers the butterfly ballot problem with counting votes in Florida in 2000. The site is also available in Flash. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Climb into the deep sea submersible Alvin to investigate the hydrothermal vents in the Sea of Cortes. You’ll learn about the seafloor geology, toxic chemistry, high tech tools and meet some odd creatures. Some of the bizarre creatures include fish that create their own light sources to lure prey, white fish and crabs, and Pompeii worms which are animals that can withstand the hottest temperature in the animal kingdom of 176 degrees F. Videos require Quicktime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour the Palaeocene, Oligocene and Pleistocene, among other eras to learn about fascinating early mammals and theories about what killed the dinosaurs. You can play a cool fossil jigsaw puzzle, the evolution game, and Help the Beasts Escape game. You can investigate different species via the family tree or in the fact file. There are teacher materials in pdf format for elementary and middle school students. Topics include plate tectonics, classification, probability, and data handling. The site requires Macromedia's Flash plug-in. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Tour this online house to find where the water savings opportunities are at your own house. Each fixture (toilet, showerhead, faucet) has facts about water usage and how to conserve water. Did you know that if your sink drips one drop per second, it will equal 192 gallons per month? That is a lot of water, literally down the drain. Because this site is based in California, some details for arid or drought areas are especially applicable to parts of the country where water conservation is essential. There is an extensive glossary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

How much water does a dripping faucet waste? How much water does it take to grow a hamburger? These, and other challenge questions, are answered in the Activity Center of this site from the United States Geological Survey which explores the properties and conservation of water. Questionnaires let you figure out how much water you use at home on a typical day. The Gallery section houses images, maps, and data sets related to water use in the US. The water cycle diagram is labeled in 50 languages, from Afrikaans to Zulu. A water glossary supplements the site. The site is also available in Spanish.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"How does gravity affect biology? The space biology site from NASA discusses experiments of weightlessness on species from bacteria to humans and other flight experiments. One section features “The Effects of Space Flight on the Human Vestibular System,” our ability to sense body movement combined with our ability to maintain balance (equilibrium).Teachers can find instructions on how to make a Barany Chair to induce spatial disorientation as an astronaut would encounter in space. Many materials can be downloaded for free about plants, worms, and other living species in space. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Take a dash of temperature, pressure, volume, and density, combine the ingredients in the troposphere and you create weather! The four major sections of the site cover blizzards and winter weather, hurricanes, clouds, thunderstorms and tornadoes. Games, stories, safety tips, and tips for forecasting the weather tell you about cold and warm fronts, cloud cover, wind and wind direction, air temperature, dew point, and barometric pressure. Activities are connected to National Science Education Standards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Wired Digital created this Web site for budding Web page builders. Students will find lessons, project, and tools—everything they'll need to help them build first-rate Web pages. Parents and teachers will find a ""Planning Guide,"" which is especially useful for those with limited experience teaching with technology."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The National Cable Television Association and TechCorps provide this free, self-paced technology tutorial for educators. This is a great way to get up to speed on everything from FTP procedures to Web browser commands to shareware to java. Beginners and advanced users alike will find valuable information at this site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"The Kids Page provides information about sea animals, book suggestions, puzzles, and a reader-written story for elementary age students. Contribute to the never-ending WhaleTale story or read what other kids are doing to celebrate Earth Day. There is an ocean activity sheet to help understand El Nino, or ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) If you have a question about ocean animals, you can ask Jake the SeaDog or read archived questions and answers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Botany is the scientific study of plants, which include lichens, mosses, ferns, conifers and flowering plants. Examples of botany specializations are plant anatomy, biophysics, ecology, ethnobotany, genetics, paleobotany, agronomy, food science, and many other interesting fields. This site from the Botanical Society of America hosts images and journal articles from the American Journal of Botany."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Asphalt, teeth whiteners, new car smell…….what IS that stuff? The Chemical & Engineering News has over 30 neat articles about everyday materials we use and what they are made of. Learn more about some of the things you put on your body (sunscreen, lipstick, hair coloring) or in your body (chocolate, Jello, food preservatives) and gives you a look at the chemistry behind these products. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Listen to the sounds of animals and try to figure out which animal is making the noise.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

The New York Times Learning Network offers a prepared lesson in which students explore the July 1999 space shuttle mission while learning how to cite Web sites in correct MLA bibliographical format.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"You may have heard the saying you have rocks in your head, but do you know you probably have rocks in your mouth? This is one of many topics at the Women In Mining site, dedicated to educating students, teachers and the general public about the importance of minerals. Other interesting topics are rocks in fireworks and minerals in makeup. There is a large assortment of word games and activities for K-12 students. One of the many fun activities is making igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rock cookies. Some activities are in pdf format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Scientists ask questions, make predictions, design and modify experiments, make observations, and draw conclusions. These activities for elementary students from the American Chemical Society are fun experiments which encourage children to become scientists. Topics include architectural structures, sound, food science, and metals. Each topic has three activities to test theories, experiment with ideas, and answers about why things happen. The section for grown ups has a PDF document titled “Science Fair Projects: A Guide for Grown-Ups” intended to help parents guide their children working on science fair projects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

Play these online interactive activities from the Science Alberta Foundation for middle school students to test the Bernoulli principle, mechanisms that use electricity, fossils, simple machines, light and shadow, testing materials and designs, hearing and sound, wetlands, and forests. All activities require Flash.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"What is the biggest, the fastest, the deadliest, and the strongest creature alive? This site by a scientist provides factual information about these creatures, links to related resources, and pinpoints on a map where to find them. Interesting notes include the types of scientists who study these organisms and often vocabulary terms are defined for the reader. There is also a metric conversion calculator to find out equivalents in the English and metric measurements."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Make this your first stop when researching endangered species. Use the factsheets on pandas, rhinos, mountain gorillas, tigers, whales, and many other species to learn about the animals, why they are endangered and conservation efforts to save them. Visit the Virtual Funhouse to find out about biodiversity and remember to check out games and activities in Fun Stuff."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Electronic School, the award-winning technology magazine for K-12 school leaders, offers this rich online supplement to their quarterly print publication. Electronic School chronicles technological change in the classroom, interprets education issues in a digital world, and offers readers practical advice on a broad range of topics pertinent to the implementation of technology in elementary and secondary schools throughout North America. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Your Sky is an interactive planetarium on the Web. You can produce maps for any time and date, viewpoint, and observing location. There are three ways to view the sky: sky map, horizon views, and a virtual telescope. Even if you don't know your longitude and latitude, you can select from a list of cities on any continent or even in the middle of the ocean and find the sky map similar to your own location. This site is fun for astronomy classes and backyard astronomers. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech

"Can a site be incredibly gross, incredibly cool, and incredibly educational at the same time? You bet. Join Wendell the Worm, an animated worm journalist, and his human pal Dora as they explore bugs, earth science, and human anatomy. Kids will be able to submit questions, read interviews, play games, and send e-postcards. Teachers and parents will find lesson plans, national standards, and a discussion forum. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Science & Tech