PBS Teachers™

PBS Teachers

Social Studies

recommended links archive

"This exhibit from the Library of Congress explores the African American quest for equality from the early days of slavery through the twentieth century. Nine chronological periods addressed include abolition, reconstruction, Booker T. Washington's era, the World Wars, the Depression, and the Civil Rights era. The exhibit presents the search for African American equality in employment, education, voting rights, and the recognition of outstanding black leaders as they fought against segregation and discrimination."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Park Service takes you for a tour to 56 historic battlefields, forts, lighthouses, ships, aircraft, and rocket sites representing the nation's ""common defense."" Start at the scene of the American Revolution, and travel through the War of 1812, the Civil War, Spanish-American War, two World Wars, and into the Cold War years. Play the monthly game ""Place the Face"" where you try to figure out who is portrayed from the site. A Teachers Guide will assist in tying in geography, civics, economics, and language arts by connecting themes with specific historic places. Viewers can browse by lists of locations or by era. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Discover the history of many modern holidays with the lesson plans at this site. Holidays from many cultures are represented here, everything from President's day to Kwanzaa. You'll also find calendars from around the world, recipes, clip art, and Webcards."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This special section of the Authentic History Center provides primary source ads, toys, and other cultural artifacts that demonstrate how racial prejudice and intolerance toward people who are different from the mainstream. The different stereotypes are Native, Latino, African, Arab, Jewish, and Asian. These images were common not too long ago. Read the essays by the sociology professor related to stereotypes and see what you think, do you see these artifacts as racist? "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"12 jigsaw puzzle sets from the American Memory collection challenge you to build four or five puzzles for each set and then figure out the theme that ties the puzzles together. You can ask for help and re-do the puzzles to better your time. Topics include Rosie the Riveter, Turn of the Century, and Play Ball! The puzzles require Shockwave to display and build."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"After you have had fun using your mouse as a flashlight in the cave, click on the Discover section to learn about the discovery of the Paleolithic cave paintings in southern France. You can take a virtual visit using a map and thumbnail images you can expand. Learn why the cave was closed and how scientists are working to preserve the paintings. The Learn section has a great deal of information about the iconography, artifacts, and dating methods. You'll also find a quiz and puzzles of the cave walls to put together."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Explore the preamble, articles, and amendments through the interactive constitution where you’ll find references to Supreme Court cases and topics ranging from Affirmative Action to War Powers. The actual text of the selection is shown along with an explanation from author Linda Monk in “Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution.” The Kids section has a game called “Save the Bill of Rights” where the mission is to restore the missing pieces of the document by answering questions about the first 10 Amendments. Lesson plans can be found on the Preamble, Declaration of Independence, First and Fifth Amendments, Suffrage, Founding Fathers, Jury Duty, and Separation of Powers. Another set of lessons are titled Just Vote!, designed to encourage student involvement in the political process."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Constitution Community is a partnership between classroom teachers and education specialists from the National Archives and Records Administration. This site offers lessons and activities that address constitutional issues, correlate to national academic standards, and encourage the analysis of primary source documents. The lessons are arranged according to historical era. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women publishes the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, described as an international bill of rights for women, defining what constitutes discrimination against women, and “sets up an agenda for national action to end such discrimination.” In particular, the 1995 The United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women resulted in the “Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action” found at: http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/beijing/platform/index.html Individual country reports are found for the 180 countries which have ratified the convention. The full text of the convention is also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, and Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Constitutional Rights Foundation has created free lessons on immigration issues. Six modules put current controversies about illegal immigration into historical and political context. The modules cover immigration from the 1600s to the present, illegal immigration, federal policy, current proposals on illegal immigration, and options affecting public policy. The modules contain readings, guided discussion questions, and interactive learning activities. The package can be downloaded in PDF. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This online project guides you to a variety of links to find out what was happening in the world on the day you were born including the news, literature, music, and television. You can collect, record, and organize data in the form of a report. The site contains animated graphics and audio clips from the Discover Online 20th Century Moment collection. There are also teacher resources."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site, sponsored by Michigan State University and the Death Penalty Information Center, is useful for high school students debating or writing papers about the death penalty. Major arguments are represented on topics such as retribution and deterrence, with materials provided for both the pro and con sides. Interactive maps indicate each state's method of execution and statistics on each state's number of executions and Death Row inmates based on ethnicity, gender, or juveniles. Actual court cases are summarized, stages in a capital case, and jury selection are also presented."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"(follow ""History Links"" on the navigational bar)
The National Council for History Education sponsors this site in order to encourage teachers to use archival documents in the classroom. This site provides materials from the National Archives and methods for teaching with primary sources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"During the Holocaust, Nazi doctors conducted horrific experiments on thousands of prisoners in the concentration camps, including children. Experiments subjected people to malaria, hypothermia, torture, and other atrocities. In 1946, the Nuremberg military tribunal began criminal proceedings against Nazi physicians for their participation in war crimes and crimes against humanity. This site from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum presents excerpts from the official trial record, with accompanying photographs. The Nuremberg Code resulted in a list of principles for permissible human experiments. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Haymarket Square riot in Chicago in 1886 was a result of a labor demonstration in support of the eight-hour working day. A bomb was thrown into the group of police sent in to disperse the demonstrators. The bomb was attributed to political radicals, and a riot ensued. The site is in the form of a drama with a prologue, several acts, and an epilogue. Each section has an interpretive essay, visual materials, artifacts, documents, and other texts. Take a virtual tour of the Market and listen to some labor songs. The essays are in PDF format and songs require QuickTime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Asian Indian men from Punjab, India began to arrive in California after hearing of high paying jobs in mills and on the railroad. Later immigrants came for higher education opportunities. This site from the University of California, Berkeley, chronicles the South Asian immigration in California. During the early 1900s, the Asian Exclusion League pressured companies to lay off Indian workers, lobbied to stop further Indian immigration, and drove Indians from their homes. In 1965, Lyndon Johnson signed the Immigration and Nationality Act, known as the Hart-Cellar Act, abolishing the ""national origins"" quota system. Since then, many Indian women also immigrated, which rarely happened prior to 1965. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Eleanor Roosevelt was a leader in establishing the United Nations, played a major role in the writing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and championed civil rights, civil liberties, housing, and women's rights. Online documents include articles, columns, correspondence, and speeches. A growing number of her ""My Day"" columns can be read at this link: http://www2.gwu.edu/~erpapers/documents/myday/ In an era when women were still not considered for political or other major public positions, Eleanor Roosevelt became a role model and leader for women and anyone interested in human rights. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The University of Chicago Press hosts a site about the United States Constitution that focuses on the problems of establishing and maintaining free popular government. The table of contents is organized by themes such as separation of powers, bicameralism, deficiencies of the Confederation, and constitutional government. Each article and amendment has multiple citations to related primary documents. For example, Amendment I (Religion) has over sixty related documents from the 1500s to the 1800s supporting or discussing the amendment, ""Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."" "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Explore the French Revolution by delving into over 600 primary documents, essays, images, songs, maps, a timeline, and a glossary. Using Real Player, you can listen to the Marseillaise as you read about the attack on the Bastille, the Tennis Court Oath, food riots and the guillotine. Learn what roles Marie Antoinette, Louis XVI, Abbé Sieyès, Robespierre, Danton, and Bonaparte played in the revolution. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The main feature of this set of digitized resources are the weekly minutes of meetings from the guardians Killarney Workhouse from 1845-1846 during the Irish Potato Famine. The minutes note how many new applicants were admitted to the famine relief workhouse that week. Also reported was how much bread, meat, salt, potatoes, milk, and other food were required to feed the poor living there. Click on the multimedia production for a series of photos and a narration of many weekly notes. A young adult bibliography is also available. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Students will learn about Mrs. O'Leary's cow and a host of other interesting facts about one of the most famous blazes in American history. This site, sponsored by the Chicago Historical Society, features newspaper clippings, eyewitness accounts, essays, bibliographies, postcard images, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Hajj, or pilgrimage, to Mecca takes place in the 12th lunar month of the Islamic calendar: January 2005, December 2006, and so on. The Hajj is an obligation required once in a Muslim’s life for every healthy man and woman. It is one of the Five Pillars of Islam of the Muslim religion according to the Prophet Mohammed. Over two million Muslims perform the pilgrimage annually. This CNN in-depth site provides information about Islam in general, the Hajj, and the pilgrims. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Slavery, the anti-slavery movement, sectionalism and the Civil War are highlighted in this online exhibit from the Chicago Historical Society. Learning Modules include a historical overview, maps, images, primary documents, fact sheets, lesson plans, recommended web sites and films. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Sala was taken from home when she was 16 and survived five years in seven different Nazi forced labor camps. She risked her life to save the letters from family and friends that were able to trickle through the Nazi postal system to prisoners. Most sections of the online display include images of postcards, letters, and photos. Sala met her future husband after the war, moved to the United States, and as of spring 2006, was still living in New York."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site was developed by an international team of three students for the ThinkQuest competition in 1998. The site includes a virtual safari, postcards, maps, a quiz, and a wealth of information about wildlife, national parks, cultures, economies, religion, and a variety of other subjects. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"What was daily life like in the Medici dynasty? The Medici Granducal Archive has survived from 1537 to the present, forming the most complete documentary record of any government, state, or ruling family in Early Modern Europe. The Archive houses documentary sources for the arts and humanities, Jewish history, costume, and textiles. Translated documents complete with historical context include prenatal care advice from a mother, a Tuscan Military Field Hospital in 1636, and themes commonly found on modern soap operas. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Annenberg/CPB Project provides an eye-opening tour of the Middle Ages explaining feudal life, religion, homes, clothing, health, arts and entertainment, and town life. Each article is hyperlinked to other sites providing supplementary information and images. For example: feudal life links to the Magna Carta, which in turn provides a high-resolution image and a translation. The also lists further Web and print resources."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"National Public Radio produced a series and accompanying site about the Middle East conflict between Israel and Palestine. The series presents the history of the conflict, the major personalities, a timeline, and maps of the past 100 years. Each side has its own version of events and both Israeli and Palestinian historians offer their views. The audio can be heard using Real Audio. Full transcripts are also provided."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"How much do you know about the British Royal Family? Improve your knowledge by learning the ABCs of the monarchy (A is for Accession, B is for Buckingham Palace…). In the Spotlight has features about the Royal pets (Queen Elizabeth has 14 dogs), the Golden State Coach, and the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace. If you are really interested in the Royal Family, don’t miss the rest of the site with information about ceremonies, the Royal household, symbols, and the Queen’s role. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution explores the period during World War II when racial prejudice and fear caused the conflict between the rights of the citizen and the power of the state. Japanese American citizens were forced to live in geographically isolated internment camps during the war. Topics include Japanese immigration, Japanese American servicemen, court cases, and loyalty questionnaires. Especially ironic were cases when interned men were drafted to fight in the U.S. military. The site is available in Flash and non-Flash format. Some classroom activities are found in the resource collection."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This archaeological investigation of a Neolithic settlement called Çatalhöyük, in what is now Turkey, where approximately 10,000 people lived 9000 years ago. There are some online activities to try at home. Read the “comics” where you click on each panel to launch an interview or investigation of an artifact. The mysteries presented discuss what people had for dinner in this community, why dead people were buried in the floor, and what the murals meant. You can investigate artifacts of human remains, animal bones, chipped stone tools, and figurines. To see how an archaeological dig progresses, view the Processes section to learn about paleobotany, lithics, drafting, and watch a video (QuickTime) of the excavation. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site offers a detailed lesson plan for teachers of social studies, current events, and the language arts. Students will first reflect on what the deaths of John F. Kennedy Jr., Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and Lauren Bessette mean to them. They will compose and read poems that will express what their deaths mean to us as a nation. Finally, students will interview members of older generations about how this event impacts them."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This website from the Seneca Falls, New York, National Women's Hall of Fame houses biographies of famous American women, provides bibliographies of women's studies, includes games about women's suffrage, and gives a brief history of women's rights."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Center for Responsive Politics is a non-partisan, non-profit research group based in Washington, D.C. that tracks money in politics and its effect on elections and public policy. The Center conducts computer-based research on campaign finance issues. The Center's work is aimed at creating a more educated voter, an involved citizenry, and a more responsive government. You can search for campaign contributions by PACs (Political Action Committees), by state, by zip code, by congressional or presidential races, by individual politician, or by industry lobbies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The mission of the Plurality Project from Harvard University is to help Americans engage with the realities of religious diversity through research, outreach, and the active dissemination of resources. There are bibliographies of religions in the United States of major religions like Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and Judaism but also less common Afro-Caribbean Traditions, Baha'i, Confucianism, Hinduism, Jainism, Native Peoples' Traditions, Paganism, Shinto, Sikhism, Taoism, and Zoroastrianism. Some statistics are provided about each religion including geographic distribution of religious centers. Within the Teacher Resources are guidelines for students studying religions, images of various religious ceremonies, and some secondary school resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Political cartoons from seven presidential elections from 1860 to 1884 are presented, most found in Harper's Weekly and many illustrated by Thomas Nast. In addition to explanations of each cartoon, the site contains biographies, timeline, explanations of the issues, campaign overviews, and other relevant information. There is a section reminding viewers that many words and images are racially offensive but display a common belief of the era."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"A collection of documentaries on war crimes and the struggle for justice presents information about the effectiveness of international justice. War crimes from the Nazi era, former Yugoslavia, and Rwanda are presented with major focus on Kosovo. Transcripts, documents and videos from trials at The Hague can be accessed. A glossary of key terms provides useful background on the subject. Be warned that many images and descriptions are disturbing. This site is not for students younger than high school."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Gallery of Art has an online exhibition of the Egyptian afterlife from the period of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC) through the Late Period (664-332 BC). Take the online tour through a full-scale reproduction of the tomb of Thutmose III, or investigate virtual objects. There are eight streaming slideshows which are narrated and also supply transcripts. Clicking on the Family Guide takes you to a twelve page PDF document great for use in the classroom. The slideshows require RealPlayer and the virtual tour requires QuickTime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Seattle Times created this site to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in April 1968. The site includes a timeline of King's life; the reflections of many King contemporaries including Andrew Young and Julian Bond; information about the creation of the MLK holiday; a look at streets bearing King's name in five communities across America; an interactive quiz; a study guide; and commentary by journalists, ministers, professional athletes, and high school students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barred all Chinese from U.S. citizenship by naturalization, and specifically excluded Chinese laborers and their families from entering the United States. This site explores the impact that Chinese Exclusion had on individual lives, families, and entire communities in America and China. Immigration documents from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) introduce you to seven case studies of immigrants seeking to enter the United States. Not all stories have a happy ending in the new country. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia hosts a site about Islam by investigating calligraphy. The major sections are based on concepts of knowledge, unity and diversity. A historical summary gives a brief timeline, notes about notable Muslims, contemporary Muslims, and women in Islam. Four different styles of calligraphy are demonstrated and are illustrated with objects from various Muslim cultures."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site from the UK for high school students has a Student Zone, Teacher Zone, Quizzes, and Case Studies. Case studies are real examples of companies that let you learn about actual business practices. You can select case studies by company, such as Cadbury (chocolate), Kellog's and Vodafone (mobile telecommunications). Teachers can use lesson plans and teacher guides. Full case studies can be downloaded in PDF documents. Brief studies (shorter versions of the case studies) can be downloaded in Word format. The Jargon Buster is a glossary of terms."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Written by three cousins who want to preserve family history through photos, this site will help you have a better understanding of who you are by exploring your past. The authors guide you through the process of starting a photo story project, one photo at a time. There is more to a photo than just the subject and date. Take the time to record the story behind the photo, you'll be glad years later and so will your descendents."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Embark on The Journey to choose your own adventure as a slave who must decide whether to run away or remain with your master. Estimates are that a runaway slave might have made it to safety in the north in two months, but often it took a year to reach freedom. Hear songs, see ingenious hiding places, and meet a dozen people who helped escaping slaves. There is also a collection of teaching ideas."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"UVA history professor Ed Ayres and his colleagues provide a rich resource for the study of American life prior to and during the Civil War. Thousands of primary source materials allow students to experience the war through the eyes of Augusta County, Virginia and Franklin County, Pennsylvania residents. This NEH-sponsored project includes newspapers, letters, diaries, photographs, maps, church records, population census, agricultural census, and military records."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Vietnam Project from Texas Tech University houses the Vietnam Archive, Vietnam Center, Vietnam Virtual Archive, and the Oral History Project. Within the Oral History Project, you’ll find resources on how to conduct an interview and numerous audio clips of interviews with Vietnam veterans. Some interviews also have transcripts in pdf format and some interviews conducted during the 1970s. There is an image index, an extensive acronym database, and other reference databases. The link to teacher resources is currently under development but due to launch in the spring of 2004. There will be lesson plans for elementary, secondary, and college levels at http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/teachers/ "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Welcome to a virtual Anglo-Saxon village, meet the local bone and antler worker or baker to find out how they do their jobs, see samples of their work, and link to further information. Rich in photographs, illustrations, and text, you can spend hours walking through the village learning about Anglo-Saxon life. The site is from a ""living history society"" which recreates a cross section of English life between AD950 - 1066."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Middle school students in West Yorkshire, England created this site about a local historical attraction. Visitors to the site can learn about the Clifford family, tenants of Skipton Castle; ask questions via e-mail; learn about castle architecture; and obtain answers to all-important questions like ""Where are the bathrooms in a castle?"" Audio narration by the students is provided for the virtual castle tour. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Featured posters from the Temple University’s Special Collections are from World War I and serve as Allied propaganda to instruct the viewer about the war effort. Of the 45 posters related to the war, many are entreating men to enlist, rationing wheat, buying savings bonds, calling women to work, and pleas from the Red Cross. One poster for the US Marines promotes “Good Pay, Foreign Travel, Congenial Employment.” Supplementary photos and charts accompany some posters. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In June 1972, the office of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate was burglarized in an attempt to discredit Democrats in the upcoming election. In 1973, John Dean testified that Nixon was part of the cover-up shortly after the break-in. Nixon refused to turn over tapes of conversations in the Oval Office. Names like Mitchell, Hunt, Liddy, Haldeman, Ehrlichman, and Colson became household words. By August 1974, Nixon resigned as President, and within a month was pardoned by President Gerald Ford. This exhibit from the Ford Library presents an overview, short biographies of key people, documents, a timeline, and images of the Watergate scandal. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is an excellent example of a community oral history project. The site is produced by students at South Kingstown High School in Rhode Island and contains 26 oral histories of women's memories of World War II, an introduction explaining how English teachers might approach oral histories, a WWII timeline, a bibliography, and two scholarly prefaces. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"White House pets Spotty, Barney, Ofelia, and India take young Web surfers on a trip to the White House. This site, sponsored by the White House, provides kids with information about the history of the White House, life in the White House, and biographical facts about the President, First Lady, and Vice President. A Teacher's Guide provides ideas on how to use the site in the classroom."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Tour the White House with Presidents Washington, Jefferson, and Truman as you look for eagles throughout the building. View the treasures of the White House art and objects like the bed in the Lincoln Room. There are floor plans, video tours with narrations of various rooms, and information about the 1814 fire. Stroll through President’s Park to see the trees, gardens, fountains, and monuments. The West Wing Exhibit shows some of the construction and remodeling for the living quarters and staff offices. Some presentations require Flash 5 and Quicktime 6. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The White House Project, a national non-partisan organization, is “dedicated to advancing women's leadership across sectors, enhancing public perception's of women's ability to lead and fostering the entry of women into leadership positions, including the presidency.” Did you know that of the 100 senators in 2004, there are only 14 who are women? That only 14% of the House of Representatives are women, or that women represent only 11% of all guests on the Sunday morning political talk shows? When women make up half the population, those are small numbers although more equitable than in previous decades. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"These documents are compiled by the National Archives and Records Administration and chronicle United States history from 1776 to 1965. Examples include Lee’s resolution on independence in 1776 and President Eisenhower’s 1961 Farewell Address where he warned against the establishment of a military-industrial complex. Each document has background information, an image of the actual document, a transcript, and a printer friendly transcript. Teachers can download the Teacher Sourcebook for suggestions on teaching with primary documents found in the collection. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The 9-11 Commission is an independent, bipartisan commission created by congressional legislation in late 2002, and was charged with preparing a full account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response to the attacks. The final report was published in July 2004 and is available in full text online at this site in PDF format. There are Frequently Asked Questions, short biographies of the 10 commissioners, video and transcript archives of the 12 public hearings, and collected press releases. Transcripts are in PDF and HTML format and video is currently available in Windows Media with Real Media to be posted in the future."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The British were actively involved in the transatlantic slave trade. This site, from the National Archives in England, was launched during the two hundredth anniversary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act, passed in 1807. There are research guides, lessons, and primary documents such as journal entries by a shipÂ’s captain, diary entries of a French explorer, and wills of abolitionists and a former slave.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian Institution created a site for A.P. History students and teachers focusing on the use of artifacts in understanding history. Artifacts tell stories, connect people, capture moments, and reflect changes. Two themes are presented: the Nation Expanding and Consumerism. There are essay questions, artifacts, and documents for students to consider. The Teacher’s Guide has student handouts and guides for teaching how to study and learn from artifacts. Ask your parents if they had any of the lunchboxes on display in the consumerism section and be sure to check out the Barbie pages. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is just getting off the ground, but Adventure Divas promises to be an exciting Web destination. Join a group of female travelers as they visit with women around the world; dispatches and interviews from their trip to Cuba are currently available on the site. Visitors to the site may also nominate international ""divas"" noteworthy women from around the world who might be the subjects of future expeditions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Affirmative Action in colleges and universities has been prominent in the news the past decade. This site from the University of California, Santa Barbara, collects many primary source documents related to specific state institutions of higher learning from California, Florida, and Michigan. Categories include gender and race, state and federal legislation, alternatives to affirmative action, individual vs. group rights, and quotas. There is an annotated bibliography. Many of the pages are online texts from this site while others are external links. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Web site is organized around thirteen migrations of African Americans in the United States from the 1400s to the present. Each migration features a narrative, maps, images, primary sources, bibliographies, and lesson plans for middle and high school linked to McRel standards. It also includes a glossary and timeline. The site is presented by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library. Flash 7 is required. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This Smithsonian site lets visitors explore Africa's diversity and history, listen to Africans talk about their lives and cultures, and discover their connections to Africa. A gallery of Yoruba carving includes examples of doors and posts, plaques, and figures. Meet the artist and follow the steps in carving a figure."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Students at Coral Gables Senior High School in Florida produced this award-winning site which examines history through the lens of the fine arts. The site begins with images and text that teach about African culture, moving through time to conclude with an examination of contemporary issues through twentieth century art. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Use the compass rose on this site to navigate through these map topics: cartography, how maps work, topographic maps, and historical maps. Topics include mental maps, different map projections and orienteering. The orienteering and some map reading skills are for advanced elementary or secondary students. Cool activities include browsing through the interactive timeline of map making and the Topographic Trek. PDF, Shockwave, and RealPlayer are required for portions of the site. This site provides more sophisticated material than first appears. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Using the menu in the cockpit, navigate the site through Amelia's childhood including her ""first flight,"" a cart careening down a greased ramp on a homemade roller coaster. Browse through other fun facts, learn about other female aviators in the early 20th century, and read news clips about her successes and her mysterious disappearance in July 1937."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History explores the role of transportation in our history. Time periods date from before 1876 to modern times with highlights of railroad, automobile, shipping, and air travel. You can explore the online exhibit by browsing a transportation type, vehicle type, era, or geographical region or by an advanced keyword search. Three games engage viewers on the topic of transportation and how it impacted the growth of commerce, communities, and landscapes. Learning Resources include historical primary resource materials, activities and projects for grades 4–11, all in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Savor the melting pot of American cooking through ten food groups including beef, chicken, turkey, pork, potatoes, corn, greens, wheat, beans, and apples. Each feature on a food type is enhanced by historical facts and a timeline of what was occurring in the US and the rest of the world. There are also interesting “Did You Know?” facts such as “to live high on the hog” means that one is wealthy enough to eat the best meat on the pig. You can find a stuffed turkey recipe from the first American cookbook written by Amelia Simmons in 1796, which has changed very little in 200 years. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Library of Congress brings you Amazing Americans, a timeline from the colonial period to modern time and information about each state. The America at Play feature highlights pastimes, hobbies, and sports. The See, Hear and Sing section includes cartoons, children's songs, buckaroos (cowboys), natural disasters, and strange musical instruments from the early to mid 1900s. Plug-ins are necessary to access audio and video clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Among the music collections at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, you’ll find online collections about fiddle tunes, Hispano music and culture, music festivals, Omaha Indian music, and Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties. Each collection is rich in audio, images, and text. To learn more about ethnographic field collection there is a concise description. A Teacher's Guide to Folklife Resources offers a list of materials that will be useful to educators who wish to incorporate folklife projects and programs into their teaching. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This Library of Congress collection houses over fifty sound recordings of speeches by American leaders from 1918-1920. The speeches focus on World War I and the 1920 Election. Speakers include Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Samuel Gompers, Henry Cabot Lodge, and John J. Pershing. Photos of speakers are in the Portrait Gallery. Audio clips are in RealAudio or wav. format, and the text is also posted. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This rich collection of primary source material from the Library of Congress incorporates documents, audio, video, maps, and photographs into forty online exhibitions. Here you'll find information on everything from the Civil War to vaudeville to folk music to the Great Depression. This is an unbelievable resource for secondary level social studies and literature classes. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law on July 26, 1990 and aims to provide equal access to public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation. In addition to accessibility to physical settings such as parking lots and rest rooms, the ADA was designed to ensure equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment and government services. You can download the Guide to Disability Rights Laws booklet that describes ten Federal laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities. A guide that students interested in engineering and architecture is the ADA Standards for Accessible Design which has graphics to better understand the requirements. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Library of Congress has produced a research guide to American Women highlighted in their collection. Manuscripts and images related to women in music, radio, drama, the screen, suffrage, reform, education, health and medicine, science, law, military, and literature are grouped for ease of searching. Topical essays include women’s suffrage, women as a symbol in early America, and women in the westward movement. It is worth the time to read the section about the guide to learn how to best use the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Whether or not you know what you want to do when you graduate from high school or college, this site has lots of useful information about careers, skills required for specific jobs, occupational outlook, wages and trends, and career tools you will want to investigate. Several videos describe occupations for people choosing non-traditional careers, apprenticeships, jobs requiring two year degrees, or working outside. There are also over 400 captioned video clips related to a wide variety of careers. Videos are available in Windows Media Player and Real Player. Career tools relate to financial aid, scholarships, writing a resume, and a skills profiler. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Navigate this interactive atlas of world astronomy by clicking on a continent. Each location provides information about native peoples and beliefs related to the cosmos. There are two interactive tours of ancient astronomy: the Maya Dresden Codex and the Aztec Borgian Codex. Bibliographies, maps, a glossary, and a timeline provide supplemental material. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Click on the hieroglyphics on the clay tablet to open the various sections of this site. Learn about Ancient Egyptian life, gods and goddesses, mummification, pyramids, trade, temples and writing. Click on each large image to enter the different sections. Images from artifacts in the museum are used to tell a story for each section. The Explore component of each section also has images that highlights important information. The Challenge component has a game or other activity. Some of these activities require Shockwave, including playing the game of Senet online."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Visit Ancient Greece from this BBC site to learn more about Greek culture, government and religion. Different sections are named by city, where Athens focuses on democracy and citizenship. Olympia explores aspects of religion and sport. Corinth has material on different types of government and pottery. The Cartoon Classics section features historical events, theater and Olympic Games. Two timelines cover events from 800 BC until the end of the Greek empire in 146 BC and another from 1000 BC to the present day. A glossary is provided from Acropolis to Zeus."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In July 1956, two ocean liners collided in the fog near Nantucket, Massachusetts. The Andrea Doria was rammed by the Stockholm creating a gash in the starboard side. Lifeboats couldn’t be launched due to the severe list of the ship, distress signals resulted in numerous ships steering toward the crash site to pick up survivors. There were 1660 survivors and 51 casualties. The story is riveting, especially because the site is created by a survivor of the shipwreck, who was 3 at the time."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site provides photos of the house and annex in which the Franks hid from 1942 -1944, biographies of those who lived with and helped the Frank family, information about Ann's diary, and descriptions of fleeing the Nazis and life in hiding and in the concentration camps. Be patient, some of the photographs and photo reconstructions take time to load."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is dedicated to the stamps, postal history and more than twenty heroic explorers of the Polar Regions and their surrounding islands. Read about Operation Highjump, a mission to train naval personnel and to test ships, planes and equipment under frigid zone conditions. Don't miss the compelling Antarctic Mayday about the crash of one plane from Operation Highjump and the thirteen-day ordeal of the survivors. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Archeoastronomy has been called the ‘anthropology of astronomy’ to distinguish it from the history of astronomy. Archeoastronomy focuses on the astronomical practices, mythologies, and religions of ancient cultures and how astronomy fit into a certain culture’s life. Stonehenge and other megaliths are featured. The site can be accessed in a Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced format. Be sure to also check out the links to planets and other astronomy related topics on the navigation icons on the bottom of each page. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Research early American documents, leaders, and historical facts, watch video clips of noteworthy events, or do a historical crossword puzzle. (some advertising)"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Arctic Circle site represents indigenous cultures in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Access of the modern world to mineral resources and strategic military locations has created problems for people living in the Arctic Circle. Environmental damage includes the Exxon Valdez, uranium mining, and oil exploration. Social problems involve land claim issues, self-determination, cultural identity and colonization. There are maps, articles on a variety of topics, and a Virtual Classroom with case studies for older students. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian Institution's Center is dedicated to the study of northern peoples, their history, and environment. Examine artifacts from Viking ships, learn about the religion of the Yup'ik people through an exhibit about their masks, and explore migrations of ancient peoples in the circumpolar world. Visit the people of the Yamal in Siberia, the Alutiiq of southern coastal Alaska, and other cultures in the Arctic Circle. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Even if you haven’t been to Arlington National Cemetery in person, you can take a virtual trip to view statues, graves, and other memorials. The more famous locations of the Tomb of the Unknowns and John Kennedy’s family are popular stops but be sure to check lesser-known sites such as the Nurse’s Memorial, Seabees Memorial, and the casualties of numerous specific military engagements. Background information on the 21-Gun Salute, wreath laying, and the Sentinels of the Tomb of the Unknowns is also provided. There are often twenty or more funerals conducted at the Cemetery each day and part of the site includes photos of funerals from each of the armed services."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Columbia University’s East Asian Curriculum Project provides resources for teachers to present Asian studies in their classrooms. Browse by subject area such as language, literature, society, economy, inventions and history or by time period. There are also collections of primary sources, multimedia units, and timelines. The featured units are on Japanese Society and Culture, The Song Dynasty in China, and the Mongols in World History. Some units have audio clips using RealPlayer. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This exhibit geared to students in grades 3-12 from the Illinois State Museum is about family life in Illinois from 1700 to the present. Illinois serves as the heart of America both geographically and culturally. You will meet people from the past and share their experiences through their own words and historical events. There are sound files, maps, images, timelines, and some QuickTime videos."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Visit the tomb of Tutankhahmen with National Geographic writer Maynard Owen Williams as you read his journal entries and correspondence from 1923. His letters are blunt about his treatment by Lord Carnarvon, who excavated the tomb. Given what we now know of Tutankhahmen's tomb, this eyewitness account gives a different view of what scientific journalism and excavation reporting was like at the time."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Avalon Project is dedicated to providing access via the World Wide Web to primary source materials in the fields of Law, History, Economics, Politics, Diplomacy and Government. The documents are organized by century, author, title, subject and event. Most documents are related to American history, including the Constitution, treaties, presidential inaugural addresses, Native American, and slavery documents. This site is indispensable to American history students and teachers."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This online exhibition from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History presents letters during wartime from the Revolution to the current war in Iraq. Transcripts of letters are found under headings of enlisting, comforts of home, love, combat, and end of the war. You can see the original letters and drag a text box along the letter to see a typewritten transcription and hear an audio narration."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Institute of Human Origins produced a documentary about human origins, guided by paleoanthropologist Donald Johanson. The five sections in the documentary are a prologue, evidence, anatomy, lineages, and culture of early hominids. The Resource section houses a glossary, media references (bibliography) and suggested web sites. Stay updated with the latest paleo news and career information. The Learning Center is still under construction, so be sure to check back in a month or two to find educational activities and lesson plans on human origins. Flash 5 and a fast connection are required for the documentary."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"From the U.S. Government Printing Office, this site houses information about the United States and arranges it into grade appropriate sections: K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12. Benjamin Franklin serves as the guide, which is appropriate since he was the first public printer in the United States. Elementary school students will especially appreciate the descriptions and images of symbols of the government, understandable descriptions of the three branches of the government, and a glossary. There are also games for all grade levels."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This Smithsonian exhibit covers sweat shops in the United States from 1820 to 1995 when a sweat shop was raided in El Monte, California and released 72 Thai nationals who were held in virtual slavery in horrid conditions. Click on each image within the three History exhibits: The Seamstress, Tenement Sweatshops, and The Resurgence of Sweatshops for details. Browse through the Fashion Food Chain and don’t miss the Global Production Game. Note the difference in pay per hour in the Chart of Global Sources. The 1996 Average Apparel Hourly Wage in the Czech Republic was $20.78, including social benefits and fringes. In the United States, it was $9.56, and in Burma, the rate was $.13."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

In the past decade, more than two million children have been killed in wars, six million wounded, and one million orphaned. Hear stories from 15 teen refuges from Afghanistan, Iraq, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, and Bosnia & Kosovo. Other features of the site are transcripts of the short refugee stories, an interactive world map, and conflict timelines. Lesson plans for high school students are about child soldiers and teen refugees. Flash is required to hear the audio versions of the stories.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Based on a telecourse, this site stands on its own for topics ranging from New World Encounters to Contemporary History of the United States. For each topic, you'll find an interactive feature related to the subject or the time period of the program, a listing of key events, a map relevant to the period, the transcript of the video program, and related Web links. Flash is required for interactive formats but the content is also available in non-interactive versions that do not require a plug-in."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Before the baseball leagues were integrated, black players had separate teams from whites until 1947 when the color line was broken. Jackie Robinson became the first African American in the twentieth century to play baseball in the major leagues, signing on to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Learn more from brief histories of various teams and the short biographies of baseball greats like Satchel Paige and Smokey Joe Williams. Some online articles include audio and video clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Gain an insight into the horrific experiences of the “boat people” through narratives of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese survivors and refugees of the Indochina wars. During the Second Indochina War, more commonly referred to as the Vietnam War, over 5 million Vietnamese died. By the end of 1979, there were 350,000 survivors living in crowded refugee camps with estimates of 250,000 refugees who drowned or killed trying to escape. These stories of sacrifice and destroyed families come from refugees who were granted sanctuary in Canada. A bibliography and photo gallery are featured also. Windows Media Player is required for the short documentary of a Vietnamese family and their Canadian sponsors. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology takes you for a historic tour of how humans have been tattooing, piercing, and painting their bodies for ages. Some of the evidence dates back to over ten thousand years ago. You’ll find a 9th century male with a pierced ear, ancient Egyptians applying makeup, and Samoans with their lower bodies tattooed with tattooing combs. Tattoo is a Polynesian word, originating in a culture that uses tattoos as a form of identity, ritual, and beauty — the same reasons many modern Americans modify their bodies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Think you’d want to “walk iron” with the men in these photos, or is it a bit too high for you? Mohawk people have been building bridges and skyscrapers for more than 100 years, mostly in New York City. Mohawk ironworkers helped build the Empire State Building, the United Nations, and the World Trade Center. One photo in particular has the ironic caption “Note the double bracing of the building’s core [South Tower of the World Trade Center].” Scroll left to right and row to row to see images of these high rise workers, and notice they aren’t using any ropes! Have a seat with the guys on the beam in Row 4. The site requires Flash 5. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The University of Michigan contains documents and images about Supreme Court cases; busing and school integration efforts in northern urban areas; school integration in the Ann Arbor Public School District; and recent resegregation issues in American schools. Additional resources are a bibliography, image gallery, and transcripts of oral arguments from the cases. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"May 17, 2004 marked 50 years since the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that struck down segregation in public schools. Teaching Tolerance Magazine has a special online issue with a timeline of integration of schools, interviews with 14 commentators, activists, and educational leaders about the legacy and impact of Brown. There are links to activities, books, websites and films on Brown. Extensions to the theme of racism in schools include bullying and stereotyping still found in schools today. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"You are a homesteader who is settling in the prairie and need to build a home. Play this game by deciding where and how to build the sod house. Choosing poorly will mean your house collapses, so take advantage of the available hints to build a solid house. After you play the game, click on the “learn more” to find activities for elementary students. It was a harsh life and less than half of homesteaders succeeded in raising crops that survived for the required five years. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This organization studies the impact of the justice system on youth of color, and the overrepresentation in most states of African-American, Latino, and Native American youth in the juvenile justice system. Click on the map to find state and federal data on arrest, referral, detention, case processing, waiver to adult court, and incarceration. Fact sheets include the topics: girls in the justice system, trying kids as adults, and conditions of confinement. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Bureau of Justice provides statistics about crime, victims, law enforcement, the court system and corrections. Special topics include drugs and crime, homicide trends, firearms and crime, and international statistics. Key facts at a glance supplies charts for crime and justice facts. For high school students doing debates on any topic related to crime, there should be useful statistics to support position statements. Many spreadsheets with data are available in .zip files for social science and mathematics classes to analyze. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"One of the standard research tools for vocational educators and career counselors is available online in its most recent edition. Students may search alphabetically, by category, or by keyword to access the latest prognoses on their favorite career choices.

"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Bureau of Labor Statistics has a site about jobs for kids who like music/arts, science, physical education/outdoors, social studies, reading, and math. Each subject heading has five or more suggested careers and provides information about the job, job preparation required, future outlook of the career, pay scale, and related jobs and suggests resources and organizations with further information about jobs in the field."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This web site provides teachers with a weekly look at C-SPAN's Campaign programming with online student activities, programming information, an archive of support materials and links to additional resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This exhibit from the National Park Service highlights the common, everyday items that Civil War soldiers used off the battleground, often to fight boredom. Click on the images to see a larger version and a caption. View common soldier belongings such as shaving kit, ""housewife"" (sewing kit), haversacks, toothbrush, mirror, and lice brush. Diversions in camp included talking, playing games, making music, whittling, and writing. Imagine who used the artifacts over 100 years ago."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Canadians served in the First World War from 1914-1918. The National Archives of Canada presents an online exhibit with portions of six War Diaries. These are not personal diaries, but record keeping for entire units. Maps of each battle, photos, and battle summaries accompany the diaries. The glossary includes definitions of abbreviations, military terms, slang, and military ranks.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Travel to Ghana with CARE, one of the world's largest private international relief and development organizations, dedicated to eliminating the complex problem of poverty. Other virtual field trips are to Bolivia, Haiti, Honduras, Kosovo, Madagascar, Mali, Nepal and Peru. Each takes you to the country via journal entries, photo album, map and background information. Issues addressed in the tours include hunger, agriculture, population control, disease and conflict."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is a commercial venture resulting from a partnership between dozens of national and regional newspapers and subscribing employers. The site offers career counselors and vocational educators a great resource for teaching about classified ads, job searching, and the world of work. Especially valuable are the online classified ads from newspapers across the country; students may search geographically and/or by job category. The site also includes career profiles, employer profiles, and information about job fairs."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

In 1994, three friends discovered a cave in France with 32,000 year old cave paintings of mammoths, bison, lions, bears, and rhinoceroses. Information at the site covers authentication of the site, dating the paintings, and descriptions from researchers who have seen the cave. The site is available in French.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Center for Civic Education is a nonprofit, nonpartisan corporation dedicated to fostering the development of responsible participation in civic life by citizens committed to values and principles fundamental to American constitutional democracy (sample lessons on Web site). We the People... Project Citizen is a program in which middle school students work in groups to learn how to monitor and influence public policy. We the People... The Citizen and the Constitution promotes civic competence and responsibility among elementary and secondary students through a curriculum focused on the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Children of the mills, mines, factories, and other difficult jobs in the early 1900s are found in the over 50 stark black and white photos of child laborers taken by photographer Lewis W. Hine. The site also includes captions and descriptions Hine provided for each photo."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"From the Voices of Youth section at the UNICEF site, students view photographs of children in cities which can be springboards for writing projects. There is general information provided about why children suffer when a city grows too quickly and sustainable urban growth. The two areas of focus on the World Summit on Sustainable Development are water and HIV/AIDS and how it affects children. The site is geared to elementary students and is also available in Spanish and French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

What was life like for British children during World War II? This site introduces elementary age students to the idea of food rationing, what a wartime home looked like, including the Anderson Shelter where a family would go during a bombing raid, blackout curtains, excerpts of letters from a mother to her daughter who was evacuated to a safer location. The Research Room has photos and posters, letters and documents, and radio and sounds. Teachers can use online activities, lesson plans, and worksheets that accompany the site.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Tour the Museum of Childhood in London to find out how different your own childhood was from children in the Edwardian era, beginning in the early 1900s. Themes to explore include nursery rhymes, food, clothes, school, child labor, parlor games, and death. Contrast that eraÂ’s childhood with East End (London) immigrant childrenÂ’s lives regarding festivals, discrimination, and toys.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Updated every year, this site is one of the most authoritative sites on countries of the world. It provides general information found in an almanac or encyclopedia: population, economy, natural resources, government, and communications and two additional categories: military and transnational issues. It also includes maps, flags, glossary, recent name changes, as well as late breaking information, such as recent changes in Kosovo."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Step inside the virtual walls of the Central Intelligence Agency! Learn what the CIA's role is. Meet some of the dogs in the Canine Corps, try on a disguises with a Shockwave game, play some decoding games, and meet Virginia Hall, an American spy during World War II. Try your hand at a geography quiz and if you haven't ever been to the CIA World FactBook online, you have to pay a visit there. It is a ""must see"" if you have any projects related to countries of the world."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

This project from the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and the Center for Media and Instructional Innovation at Yale University tells about the history of slavery in Connecticut, emancipation, and the struggle for citizenship. The Transatlantic Slave Trade is briefly described. Connecticut Stories provide primary documents and activities and short videos by historians.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Intended for immigrants studying U.S. history and government for their naturalization test, the resources here are excellent materials for students also. There are almost 100 Civics Flash Cards to print, a booklet based on the questions on the test, a Pocket Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States, and a Citizen's Almanac with information about symbols, rights and responsibilities of US citizens, and landmark decisions of the Supreme Court. Several of the documents are available in English, Spanish, and Chinese. All downloadable materials are in PDF.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"A non-partisan group of educators and community leaders have collaborated to present ideas and resources on active citizenship issues: community, environment, families, gender, children, and health, among others. Community networking and civic renewal are at the heart of this network. A civic dictionary, manuals, and teacher resources are provided to help civic minded individuals and groups on how to organize and work in productive ways."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Many people view civil rights as only the rights secured in the 1960s by the African American community, but civil rights extend to all citizens. This site from the Department of Justice has information about special topics including fair housing, human trafficking, and the post-9/11 discriminatory backlash. There are also over a dozen translations of a document related to federal protections against national origin discrimination. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Civil Rights Project provides current research related to many civil rights issues. The specific K-12 education issues include: Access to College, Discrimination in Special Education, Dropouts, Gate-Keeping: Allowing All Children Access to Advanced Courses, Resegregation in American Schools, School Choice, Testing, Title I: Better Schooling for Educationally Deprived Students, and Zero Tolerance Policies and School Discipline. There are also more than 100 reports, working papers, and articles available for free online, dating from 1997 to the present. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery presents images from the American Civil War. You can view the online exhibit using a timeline or by topic: Slavery & Abolition, Abraham Lincoln, First Blood, Soldiering, Weapons, Leaders, Cavalries, Navies, Life & Culture, and Appomattox. Use the arrows or the thumbnail grid in the navigation bar to find your way around the site. Drawings by Winslow Homer and photos by Mathew Brady are highlighted. Flash 5 is required for part of the site."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Ohio State Department of History presents the clash of the old and the new cultures at the beginning of the 1900s. The main topics are: Prohibition, the Scopes Trial, the New Woman, Anti Immigration and the KKK. Each topic goes into detail over the key issues that were in opposition, such as fundamentalism vs. science in the Scopes “Monkey” Trial. The conflicts had political, legal, and cultural repercussions that are sometimes still debated. Most topics are enhanced with photographs, cartoons, and documents."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"CNN provides images and commentary related to issues in the news at their Specials collection. Topics for 2002 include Mideast: Centuries in Conflict and War Against Terror. In-Depth topics from 1995 to the present are archived. Categories for each year include highlights from world news, U. S. news, entertainment, sports, and business. Many stories include interactive features, maps, video, and other enhanced features."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This CNN Perspectives series explores the Cold War experience between 1945 and 1991. Highlighted features include espionage, the bomb, culture, and technology. Test your knowledge of the popular culture of television, fashions, movies and music of that era. Espionage uncovers tools of the trade and master spies of the East and West. The section on the bomb relates the fear, cost, deployment, and timeline of nuclear bombs. The technology feature focuses on the space and arms race. Included are interactive maps, video footage, declassified documents, biographies, picture galleries, timelines, interactive activities, and an educator’s guide. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Why do civilizations fall? War, drought, natural disaster, disease, overpopulation, economic disruption can occur alone or in combination to bring a civilization down. This site investigates why the Maya, cultures in Mesopotamia, Chaco Canyon, Mali and Songhai disappeared. The Maya exhibit has a virtual archaeological dig to look for clues into the collapse of Copan. Sift through information about monuments, people, bones, botany, and houses and note your discoveries in an online journal. Information about how archaeologists find, interpret, and date evidence they have found. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The College Board provides an online questionnaire that asks students about their temperament, ideal working conditions, likes/dislikes, abilities, and more; results of the survey are returned immediately, and students are encouraged to learn more about the careers that match through links to job descriptions, salary information, and requirements."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site provides free information about all accredited colleges and universities in the U.S. Its search feature allows students to look for colleges based on location, academic areas, sports, student body demographics, special programs, and more. The site provides virtual tours of hundreds of universities, financial aid and scholarship information, application forms when available online, career planning tools, and forums for students to talk to undergrads and college admissions experts."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Photos, drawings, and brief highlights of immigration by sea are presented by Mystic Seaport, the Museum of America and the Sea. Unless your ancestors were Native American, this site suggests that your forefathers and mothers probably came to the US by ship. Populations noted are early European travelers, slaves brought by boat, Irish escaping from the Potato Famine, German speaking people, Chinese, Japanese, Cuban, and Haitians. The passage was not easy, as many died of disease. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Beginning with the Lincoln and Douglas debates of 1858, and then skipping ahead to 1956 and 1960, then from the elections of 1976 to 2004, this site from the Commission on Presidential Debates hosts resources about the debates among United States presidential and vice presidential candidates. The voter education section provides a Guide to Hosting Your Own Debate. Transcripts of most debates are posted so you can analyze the text yourself and compare the candidates’ comments. It is interesting to note that the CPD did not sign the 32 page memo of understanding between the Bush and Kerry campaign managers, stipulating what could and could not take place during the 2004 debates. You’ll find those rules listed here: http://news.findlaw.com/hdocs/docs/election2004/debates2004mou.pdf "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum hosts a site about modern day genocide, acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group. Current features are the Balkans, Chechnya, Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Of the six things you can do to help prevent genocide suggested at this site, the top is to stay informed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"CongressLink provides information about the U.S. Congress, how it works, its members and leaders, and the public policies it produces. The Information Center houses the main guide to Congress, contact information, issues and legislation. Check the large number of legislation related to the September 11th terrorist attacks. The Features section provides historical information and congressional procedures. Classroom Resources include lesson plans, historical materials and classroom aids. Congress for Kids addresses younger students, although login is required. The site is available in French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Constitutional Rights Foundation (CRF) is a non-profit, non-partisan, community-based organization dedicated to educating America's young people about the importance of civic participation in a democratic society. Online lessons include topics on the war in Iraq, terrorism, service-learning, and the Bill of Rights in Action. Quarterly themes in the Bill of Rights in Action can be found online or ordered for free through the mail and provide background information on the topic, discussion questions, additional resources and an activity. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Opinions will differ on the wisdom and necessity for an expedition team from FUNAI, the Brazilian agency responsible for native peoples, to seek an encounter with Korubo in western Brazil in 1996. There were decades of violence between the tribe and local settlers, and the expedition team's role was to protect the Korubo territory primarily from health risks of introduced diseases. The Dispatches give a first hand account of the project. Look through the Portfolio for information about the participants, flora and fauna, and the Korubo culture. Read the visitor comments in the Talk to Us section for a range of reactions to the question whether the Korubo should have been contacted. Although hosted by National Geographic, they did not sponsor or fund this expedition."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"From the Conversations with History Archive at the University of California at Berkeley, this site focuses on women’s rights where you can read transcripts of interviews with men and women activists and authors reflecting on securing women’s rights. The timeline categorizes historical events, women in power, laws related to women’s rights, and consciousness of women’s rights. The classroom activities link to the New York Times Learning Network for lesson plans connected to McREL standards. The video clips don’t download at this writing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This online educational journal is ""dedicated to the promotion of computers and related technology in social studies classrooms, at all levels."" Users will need to pay a $10 subscription fee to read feature articles for one year, but there are dozens and dozens of well-organized links to other history and social studies related Web sites. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Qin Shihuangdi Mausoleum with the Terra Cotta Army is the main feature of this site. The army was found in 1974 when people were digging a well and came upon a vault of terra cotta statues with larger than life men, each one unique. Terra cotta horses and a bronze chariot were also discovered. Other archaeological finds presented are Peking Man and Oracle Bones. Most images have descriptions and large images after clicking on the thumbnail. Detailed site layout diagrams shown are the Mausoleum of Qin Shihuangdi, the Temple and Mansion of Confucius, the Forbidden City, and the Summer Palace. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Search by regions in Africa, Asia, Mesoamerica, the Middle East, Oceania, or other parts of the world to find articles and other documents related to indigenous people and how they are affected by modernization. Major issues addressed are conflict and migration, culture, health, self determination, and natural resources. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"From IDEA, the International Debate Education Association, this database of debate topics provides resources on themes of governance, health, culture, law, politics and sports. You can search the “debatabase” by specific topic, theme or keyword. Sample topics range among treatment of aboriginals, beauty contests, and child curfews. There are pro and con arguments on debating topics written by expert debaters, judges and coaches. You’ll also find background summaries, example motions and pointers to additional resources. Whether you are an expert debater or a novice just learning the process, you’ll be glad you used this site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"If you have ever been frustrated about getting a paper back with editing marks, take heart, you are in good company. Thomas Jefferson's rough draft of the Declaration of Independence, along with Congress's draft, and the final version are found at this site. Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration in three weeks at the Graff House, stating the reasons for the colonies to separate from Great Britain. He was plagued by horseflies from the neighboring stables. You'll find short biographies of the 56 signers of the Declaration, other prominent people, events, and laws which help understand the background for the ""treasonous"" act by the Continental Congress. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Three high school students from India, the Netherlands, and the USA created this award-winning ThinkQuest site in 1997. The beautifully designed site is available in three versions (text-only, java-enabled, etc.); the site offers information about ecology, geography, geology, and the people who inhabit the Himalayas. Visitors may access maps, audio clips, quizzes, the stories of other site visitors, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery offers this elegant site as a fitting tribute to India's Great Goddess. The site includes information on the manifestations of Devi, representations of the Goddess, and a special section designed just for kids. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Perhaps you are new to teaching with primary documents or you are using more DBQs (Document Based Questions) in the classroom. The Digital Classroom from the National Archives and Records Administration will show you how to teach with documents. Document analysis worksheets guide students through citing a source and thoughtful questions about why the document might have been written and how it might relate to US history at the time. Sample lessons use photographs from the War in Vietnam http://www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/vietnam_photographs/vietnam_photos.html and documents from the Brown v. Board of Education case http://www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/brown_v_board_documents/brown_v_board.html

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Geographic Societ takes you to visit four areas: Mexico City, Tijuana, and the Border, the Heartland, and Chiapas. Read reports on survival in the City, smog, the stock market, leaving home for the U.S., working, charros (cowboys), the Day of the Dead, revolution, and land reform. The site includes maps, many outstanding photos, and dispatches from the field of the reporter. You can also read some questions the reporter received and his answers. Be sure to click on the Mariachi bands playing! Viva Mexico! RealAudio is required for audio clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Do Something is a nationwide network of young people who know they can make a difference in their communities and take action to change the world around them. Many social issues are treated at this site such as child abuse, violence in school, teen pregnancy, discrimination, and drunk driving. Action Guides offer teens ideas of how they can make a difference. Teachers find helpful lesson plans and activities, community project ideas, measurement tools, and other coaching assistance for school groups. As Mahatma Gandhi is quoted on the site, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site offers a collection of sources on Southern history, literature and culture from the colonial period through the first decades of the 20th century. Most valuable are the dozens of diaries and journals written by Southern men and women—all available online as electronic texts. These primary documents are a rich source of content, but there are also strong essays on historical and cultural conditions that help place these writings in a firm context."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Over two million refugees fled from the former Indochina after 1975 when the US withdrew from Vietnam. More than half of these refugees settled in the United States. Sixty-six percent came from Vietnam, twenty-one percent are from Laos, including the Hmong, and thirteen percent of the refugees are from Cambodia. This site documents the resettlement experience of these Southeast Asian refugees by means of photos, letters, and other artifacts. Background summaries for the different cultures are provided for a period of history often neglected in textbooks. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site from the library at the University of Michigan identifies issues making headlines in government and provides primary documents and links to web sources with additional information. Stories in the news from 2002 include Enron, the Salt Lake City Olympic games, the Arab-Israeli conflict, college drinking, and presidential records protection. Archived documents are from 1995 to the present."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"DoHistory guides its high school users through the research process. It is an experimental, interactive case study based on the research that went into the book and film ""A Midwife's Tale"", both based on the 200-year-old diary of midwife/healer Martha Ballard. You can learn basic research skills and techniques for interpreting historical documents. By reading Martha Ballard's diary, you can try transcribing her handwriting and checking it against the transcriptions done by the historians. There are thousands of downloadable pages from original documents at the site, court records, town records, account books, medical texts, and more. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Northwestern University brings visitors an extensive archive of famous orations. Visitors may search by speaker, time period, theme, or title of the address. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Before Horton, the Grinch, and the Sneeches, Dr. Seuss penned over 400 editorial cartoons about World War II for the New York newspaper PM. The cartoons at this site are arranged in chronological order so you may search by date, but also by subject terms such as Hitler, war bonds, and rationing. Other sections are titled People, Countries/Regions, War/Domestic Issues, and Battles and Battlefields. His style is unmistakable and students will be surprised at the seriousness of many of these images compared to the images they remember from childhood."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is a daybook of holidays and celebrations around the world. Browse by date, country, and religion or search by keyword. Click today and learn what is being celebrated and where. Some countries include maps and national flags. Lunar calendars for 2001 and 2002 are available. What holidays are celebrated on your birthday?"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Discover the world of art, science, nature and social studies with these web adventures and online activities. Students can tour the Ecuadorian Amazon and run a community-based ecotourism project, or travel back in time to the Renaissance and explore Leonardo da Vinci's workshop-among many other things. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Students participating in the ThinkQuest competition designed this educational introduction to the stock market. Included are company profiles, a history of the stock market, a glossary of stock terminology, information about different types of stocks, and a stock market simulation. (The simulation requires that users provide an e-mail address.) "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Scholastic hosts a site about elections titled “How to Run for President” and it takes students through the process of choosing a political party, how to be a fundraiser, choosing a campaign team, getting through the primaries, and how to pick a running mate. The activities include a quiz (printable and can also be scored online) and an election scavenger hunt. There is also a cool activity called “If You Were President” where you balance the budget according to your values and the game uses your choices and quotes to create a news article. Illustrated with colorful maps and charts, this site is helpful for upper elementary and middle school students who are learning about the election process. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Election Reform Information Project is the nation’s only non-partisan, non-advocacy website which serves as a clearinghouse for election reform information regarding topics including the Help America Vote Act (HAVA). The interactive map lets you select a topic and region to find information about the voting age population, ethnicity of the voting age population, registered voters, and the voting system in place for many states. Free publications can be downloaded in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Learn more about how we elect our leaders in the United States. You'll find out about how candidates appeal to voters, the rights of voters and the struggle for African Americans, women, and Native Americans to gain the right to vote. Ever heard of the Know-Nothing party? Find out more about the political parties and try the matching game in the party system section. Primary elections are discussed in the election process section, and the issues in elections section discussed war, slavery, corruption and foreign policy."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Explore the Immigrant Experience online through two areas on this Ellis Island site. The first is a collection of six family histories of Americans from different backgrounds researching immigrant ancestry. Personal histories portrayed include descendents of slaves, Bohemian (now Czech Republic) Jews, Italians, Mexicans, Chinese, and Irish. The second is a timeline of immigration history and graph showing how many people came from different areas of the world. For some it was to escape famine, pogroms, revolutions, and for others to begin a new life free from persecution for religious beliefs and to find economic opportunities. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Enron business scandal has been in the news for several years. The Houston Chronicle posts a site that is updated daily with news articles, background materials, timeline, and key players. A running list of criminal charges, convictions, and jail terms are posted. ""Cast members"" have short biographies, indictments, charges, and plea bargains. Anyone studying business ethics should read through this site, especially understanding the accusations."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Schlesinger Library of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University hosts a site about enterprising women where online visitors meet women business owners and managers. People featured at the site include an inventor, rancher, tailor, publisher, and banker. Some names like Oprah Winfrey and Martha Stewart are household names, but other women highlighted here are Brownie Wise (marketer of Tupperware), Olive Ann Beech (Beech Aircraft), Julia Morgan (architect of Hearst Castle), and Mary Katharine Goddard (America’s first postmistress and newspaper publisher). Browse through the site via the Story Quilt. An interactive game “Mind Your Own Business” demonstrates student understanding of the site content. The game “Biz Quiz” helps students learn to write their own business plan. Teachers can find lesson plans under Resources. Flash is required for the games. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"An online tour of the Erie Canal takes you from Albany to Buffalo, connecting the Hudson River to Lake Erie, and presents the canal through images, songs, text, and maps. The three minute introduction is narrated. You’ll see panoramas and postcards of communities along the canal from the early 1900s, a timeline, and current community profiles. Flash and QuickTime are required."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"SportsCentury is from ESPN noting the top 50 greatest athletes of the century, as voted by a blue-ribbon panel of sports journalists and observers. You might be interested to compare the lists at this site with the Sports Illustrated for Women, since there are only two women in this list of the top 20, and neither are the number one pick for SI. Each of the 100 is listed with a biographical sketch and photo. Check out what “classic moment” occurred on your birthday. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"From the Egyptian Center for Documentation of Cultural and Natural Heritage (CultNat) and IBM Corporation, you are given the opportunity to tour tombs and view artifacts from Ancient Egypt. The Eternal Egypt site includes images, 3D reconstructions of Egyptian monuments, panoramic views, an interactive map, and a timeline. The ""context navigator"" connects relationships between objects, places and people. For example, an artifact like a winged scarab pendant is related to a character, Tutankhamun, and how he is related to a place, the Valley of the Kings. Shockwave is required for some of the features like the animation of the multiple layers of Tutankhamun’s tomb. Some artifacts have narrated descriptions in IBM Text-to-Speech. There is so much to explore at this site that you should give yourself plenty of opportunities to experience it via the different approaches provided. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The eugenics movement in the early 1900s was an effort to breed ""better"" humans by encouraging people with ""good genes"" to reproduce and discouraging those with ""bad genes"". At the time, social prejudices influenced scientific study related to eugenics but those theories have been disproved. Eugenicists believed races and ethnic groups should be kept separate, immigration should be restricted, and that people with ""unfit"" genes should be sterilized. Images including primary source documents can be searched by subject or keyword. There are Flash and text versions of the online exhibits. Some language and images may be offensive. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"""All Japanese persons, both alien and non-alien, will be evacuated from the designated area by 12:00 o'clock noon Tuesday, April 7, 1942"" (Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry). Read the daily editorials and articles about the evacuation of Japanese Americans and internment in refugee camps. These primary sources from The San Francisco Museum include a 1942 San Francisco War Events timeline, the War Relocation Authority's 1943 publication ""Relocation of Japanese Americans"" and excerpts from Gen. DeWitt's Final Report on the Evacuation of the Japanese. Other museum resources include PowerPoint presentations of photographs by Dorothea Lange, the Tanforan Assembly Center, and the Manzanar Relocation Center. Students today might be surprised to see the widespread racism of just 60 years ago. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"1200 people have climbed to the summit of Mt. Everest and 200 have died in the process. 50 years ago, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were the first to reach the top. This site from the National Geographic includes a 9 minute presentation with audio and video about the Sherpa culture, the first ascent, and Hillary’s humanitarian efforts. Other features are stunning photographs, the 1963 National Geographic article relating the first American ascent, a map, and a 3D model you can manipulate. Animations require Flash and QuickTime. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Second grade teacher Ed Bonne provides a detailed plan for how elementary school teachers can paint maps on a playground or gymnasium floor in order to teach geography.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Visitors can tour Grandfather's house and learn about traditional Korean houses, art, and family activities. The Kids section lets children move objects into the correct room of the house, read a folktale, and learn to count to 10 in Korean. Lesson plans for grades K-5 focus on visual elements, architecture, composition, function and design. Other topics include writing Korean words and folktales. Some of the handouts to be downloaded show how to write and say Korean numbers 1-10. Students can cut out he template of a tradtitional Korean house and create a 3D model."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"If your ancestors were among the 22 million immigrants to arrive in the United States through Ellis Island, you can search the database of millions of immigrant arrival records to find more about them. You don't need to be a descendent of an Ellis Island immigrant to take advantage of this site. The Immigrant Experience section offers six views from people of different ancestry and their search for family members. The Peopling of America is a timeline of major immigration events. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"A ThinkQuest Junior site, which is frequently updated, has information about explorers from the past thousand years. You can browse by a timeline or by the Hall of Fame. The students who created the site include a bibliography, links to other resources on explorers, and a quiz."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Created by University of Evansville (Indiana), Exploring Ancient World Cultures (EAWC) is an online course supplement for students and teachers of the ancient and medieval worlds. It features its own essays and primary texts. It includes chapter-length histories for each of the eight ""cultures"" represented: The Near East, India, Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, Early Islam and Medieval Europe. In addition to its own resources, EAWC also includes a substantial index of Internet sites."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Learn history by reading first person narratives. There are a few events from before the 1700s, such as the destruction of Pompeii in 79 AD, but most take place between 1750 and 1945. Illustrations, maps, photos, and further links enhance the content. Be sure to visit sounds of the past in the Voices of the 20th century and try out the Snapshots where you can roll over a section of a photograph to learn more details about the people and events in the photos."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Law professor Doug Linder provides a site with 25 famous trials dating from the Salem Witch Trials in 1692 to the 1995 O.J. Simpson trial. Other trials are the Rosenberg, Scottoboro, My Lai, Nuremberg, Oscar Wilde, and Sacco-Vanzetti. Spotlights often include an overview, map, chronology, biographies, trial transcript excerpts, court decisions, images, audio clips and a bibliography. Real Audio is required for the trials with audio clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Some of the topics you can browse at the Federal Elections Commission site are about how the electoral college works, the distribution of electoral college votes among the states, campaign finance reform, and voting systems. You can learn more about the paper ballot, the mechanical lever machine, punch cards (remember hanging chads?), Marksense (filling in a shape) and Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) devices with touchscreens or other electronic devices. If you are curious about the many Political Action Committees (PACs), use the Pacronym feature to find out what each one stands for. Many of these documents are available in Word or PDF format, and are also available in Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Federal Interagency Council on Statistical Policy maintains this site to provide access to statistics produced by more than 70 agencies. Searchable by index or keyword, this site provides information on agriculture, crime, demographics, economics, education, energy, environment, health, income, labor, national accounts, natural resources, safety, and transportation. A specific Kids Page provides links to statistical agencies serving students in elementary through high school. The Web pages include fun facts, games, project ideas, and career information."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"What would you rather do, go to school or work in the fields? This site funded by the US Department of Labor is about child labor specific to agriculture. Select a country from Around the World to learn where children work, the status of national and international child labor laws, and demographic data related to education. Resources include a teacher's guide, quiz, glossary, poster and brochure. Spend a day in the life of a child laborer and maybe you won't complain when asked to load the dishwasher. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Access to FinAid is free for all users and includes a vast collection of information about financial aid, grants, and loans. It is an excellent place for students looking for ways to finance their education. There is also a section with information about student financial aid resources for students who are interested in pursuing careers in the military and for veterans and their dependents. Be sure to check the section on other types of aid because there are special options for different student profiles. Also see the custom calculators to help you figure out how much school will cost, how much you need to save, and how much aid you'll need."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The First Amendment Center, from Vanderbilt University offers general information on First Amendment issues: speech, press, religious liberty, assembly and petition. Each topic has frequently asked questions, legal cases, news, analysis, commentary, and related library resources. Some K12 related topics include prayer in school, dress codes, Pledge of Allegiance, and freedom of expression in schools. The organization conducts an annual survey, The State of the First Amendment survey, on how Americans view these freedoms. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The First Amendment, in part, guarantees the right to freedom of speech and of the press. This handbook first published in 1986 by The Reporters Committee For Freedom of the Press provides a basic primer on the laws affecting reporters' rights to gather and disseminate news. The ten chapters go into detail on the topics of libel, invasion of privacy, surreptitious recording, confidential sources and information, prior restraints, gag orders, access to courts, access to places, freedom of information acts, and copyright. Most sections provide notes giving examples of court cases where the topic was in question."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Boeing B-17 ""Flying Fortress"" was a World War II bomber used primarily in Europe. B-17s from the U.S. Eighth Air Force flew on missions from bases in England. This site takes you on an interactive tour of a B-17G, the last model to be built. Click a crew position on the cutaway drawing and navigate a panorama of his working space. Click a veteran crewmember and listen as he describes his flight responsibilities. The site includes historical information, technical specifications, and combat photographs. Don't miss Rosie the Riveter. Millions of women built thousands of planes during the war. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Freedom House is a nonpartisan organization that monitors freedom throughout the world, reporting on political, religious, press, conscience, and economic freedom. Other topics of reports are civil liberties and universal human rights. By selecting specific countries, find how they rate in political rights and civil liberties. A special report, Nations in Transit, discusses 28 former Communist countries."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Academy of Achievement is a nonprofit organization endorsed by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, dedicated to promoting the accomplishments of exceptional Americans in the fields of Arts, Business, Science, Public Service, Sports, and the American Dream. This site is organized as a virtual exhibit with 'halls' dedicated to each of the areas mentioned above, as well as special areas devoted to the qualities of integrity, courage, perseverance, passion, vision, and preparation. Dozens of business leaders, thinkers, and public figures like Jimmy Carter, Rita Dove, Twyla Tharpe, Sir Edmund Hillary, Benjamin Carson, Oprah Winfrey, and others are featured through extensive interviews, biographies, audio and video clips. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Did you know that the deadliest natural disaster to hit the United States was the Galveston Hurricane in 1900? One in six residents, about 8,000 people, died as a result. CNN has compiled photos, narratives, maps, and other resources to commemorate the centennial of Hurricane Isaac and its destruction of Galveston, Texas."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Genocide Education Project assists educators in teaching about human rights and genocide, in particular, the Armenian Genocide in 1915 when 1.5 million Armenians were exterminated by the Turkish government of the Ottoman Empire. There are lesson plans, a cyber resource library with free materials available to download in PDF, and an annual award to provide recognition for an outstanding educator who has implemented lessons on the history of the Armenian Genocide in her/his curriculum."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Center for Human Rights & Humanitarian Law from American University’s Washington College of Law provides a booklet, “The Rwanda Commemoration Project: Genocide in Our Time” for secondary school teachers. It includes a lesson plan, activities, and suggestions for what students can do to help raise awareness of the genocide in Darfur, Sudan. The main content is about the genocide in Rwanda in 1994 when nearly a million people were killed in three months while the international community largely stood by without intervening. The intent of the site is to serve as a reminder and warning about genocide in our time and how we can help stop it from happening again."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Genocide is defined in international law as “acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group.” Gregory H. Stanton’s 8 Stages of Genocide are presented: classification, symbolization, dehumanization, organization, polarization, preparation, extermination, and denial. There is a chart of nations in Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East, with details about death tolls, those responsible for the killing, main division (reason) such as political, ethnic, racial, or religious, and the stage for each as of 2005. Because these include events occurring today, there will be some controversy as to the “genocide” label."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Upper elementary students will enjoy playing the online geography game Geonet. Students choose a region of the United States and whether they’d like either hard or easy questions. There are political, regional, physical, climate, time zone, and vegetation reference maps. The game questions are organized according to the National Geographic Standards: The World in Spatial Terms, Places and Regions, Physical Systems, Human Systems, Environment and Society, and The Uses of Geography. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This National Geographic Kids site has an interactive choose-your-own-adventure style of story. It is 1804 and you sign on to travel with Lewis, Clark and their crew on their expedition to map the west. Wrong turns and smart decisions are both learning experiences as you travel with the explorers. Along the way, read excerpts from Lewis's journal. At journey's end, view the map of the path you made based upon your decisions."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Oakland Museum of California takes you to the Gold Rush days of 1848-1849. In addition to background information on the era, art of the gold rush is highlighted by artists such as William Smith Jewett and Charles Christian Nahl, who created a visual record of Gold Rush events. Note the alternate views in the site from the native Californian Indian, African American, Californio/Latinos and immigrant Chinese who were all part of the gold rush. Be sure to try the onsite adventures, quiz, and tales from the mines. Shockwave is required for movie and audio clips, including some in Spanish. QTVR is required for panorama views. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The US Government raises and spends almost 3 trillion dollars per year. A stack of that many dollar bills would circle the Earth more than 7 times or if laid end to end, would reach the sun. This site provides a nonpartisan analysis of the Federal Budget, gives details about federal spending, revenues, and deficits, and describes the process of how the President's Budget is sent to Congress and how the Senate and House Budget Committees draft their own plans resulting in the Congressional Budget Resolution.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Click on the sword to launch the site to find out about these themes during the Middle Ages: knowledge and communication, space and time, rural life, merchants, crusades and pilgrimages, and the authorities. Each theme includes half a dozen artifacts to click on for a closer view with a description. The button on lower right corner allows you to turn off and on the music for each theme. There is brief animation from a merchant, peasant, monk, and knight about passing 15 tests, but that section of the site doesn’t seem to be currently in operation. Don’t let that discourage you from exploring the Middle Ages in English or French. QuickTime is required for the entire exhibit. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Most people know about the Great Chicago Fire and Mrs. O’Leary (later found innocent), but did you know that a fire swept through much of the business section of Baltimore a hundred years ago destroying more than 1500 buildings? This fire pointed out the need for a standardized fire hydrant because firefighters from three states came to assist, but most of their hoses wouldn’t fit on the Baltimore hydrants. Compare images of 1904 to current times on the interactive map. There is a print version that presents the entire interactive journey in one document. The site requires Java and the two film clips are in Windows Media Video format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Designed by the Science Museum of Minnesota with support from the National Science Foundation, this site offers visitors all sorts of information about the Amazon, Madagascar, Greenland, Namib, Tibet, and more. Students will find online journals, video clips, recipes, bibliographies, maps, and games for each location."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Listen to the stories told by four young men who sat at the Greensboro, North Carolina at Woolworth’s on February 1, 1960 and who were refused service at a white lunch counter. In just two months, the sit-in movement spread to 54 cities in 9 states. There is a timeline, historic photos, and information about key people at the time. There are also clips of interviews from the photographer who took the only photo of the first sit in, the reporter who covered the story, Woolworth’s employees, and city officials. Interviews require RealAudio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Even an armchair traveler can enjoy dreaming of hiking along Hadrian’s Wall in England and exploring the Roman forts along the 84 mile route. Use the Interactive Map to find Roman constructions on this World Heritage Site, which “are places of outstanding universal importance to humankind, both cultural and natural.” A fun “Guess the Object” game has ten objects you can inspect with a magnifying glass and guess what it is. Flash is required for the map and game."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In the early 1900s, Harlem symbolized the African American community's political movements, education, sports, social organizations, religion, theater, business, and music. The personalities include Marcus Garvey, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. Search by using the timeline for events in history. Click on Exhibition for topics on activism, arts, and business. Resources for teachers are available."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This online village is set in rural New York to show how agriculture practices differ from 1845 to modern times. Tour the virtual village to explore the barn, print shop, blacksmith, pharmacy, and other trades in town. Most trades take you from the 1845 shop to the modern version in short video clips. Browse through images listed as primary sources by theme, type, and geography, like an 1866 toll rate posting for crossing a bridge depending on how many animals are pulling a wagon. You can create your own video by saving video clips and images in the Village Videomaker. The site is geared to upper elementary students and there four curriculum modules in the teacher section."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The New Bedford Whaling Museum hosts a site about African Americans in the Whaling Industry. Black and Creole mariners became a majority in many ship’s crews, were blacksmiths creating tools for the industry, and often rose to become captain of their own whaling ships. Main topics include profiles of master mariners, harpooners, whale processing, and activities for idle time like scrimshaw and ship modeling are featured."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"History and Politics Out Loud is a searchable archive of politically significant audio materials hosted by Michigan State University. You can also browse by date, speaker, or title. The majority of the audio files are from the 1960s and 1970s although some are from the 1930s. There are many from Richard Nixon’s Watergate related tapes, including the “Smoking Gun” tape. Other famous speeches include Lyndon Johnson’s address to Congress on voting rights, John Kennedy’s speaking on the Cuban Missile Crisis, and Franklin Roosevelt’s request to Congress to declare war on Japan. Each audio file has a catalog record with date and location recorded, short description, and transcript. Streaming audio uses either RealPlayer or QuickTime."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site for high school and college students in US history courses has a large collection of primary sources in text, image, and audio about the experiences of ordinary Americans throughout U.S. history. Of special interest is the Making Sense of Evidence section, which provides useful guides about background and strategies for using various primary sources, including oral history, films, maps, and photographs. Each guide includes activities or questions students should ask themselves as they use primary sources. Try the activity in photography where you need to order the six photographs taken by Dorothea Lange, which ended with the famous image “Migrant Mother.”"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Did you know that the four agricultural products in Colonial America, corn, cotton, wheat, and tobacco all appear on currency? This site from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco offers a tour of U.S. money from colonial to present times. You can learn about the imagery such as shields, plants, eagles, and other symbols found on paper money. Historical context is provided for periods including Independence, the Westward Movement, the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution. Clicking on the images brings a larger view and with the current $100 bill, an ""anatomy"" of the bill with descriptions of new anti-counterfeit features."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian Museum of American History has developed a cool way to ""walk"" through their online museum. You can choose to browse using the object map or the text version. Each view groups museum objects by topic, such as clothing, sports, transportation, and features individual items from Lincoln's Life Mask to the Lone Ranger's Mask. Java required for the interactive ""object map"". You can even vote for your favorite museum piece. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Read about six Holocaust survivors, a death train escapee, prisoners of war, labor camp prisoner, and a hidden child. Their stories are chilling and the photographs are graphic. Some of the interviews are provided in RealAudio with transcripts and translations when in other languages. An encyclopedia and additional texts are provided."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Royal Ontario Museum presents introductory information about the longhouse and allows you to tour a virtual site as an ""archaeologist"". You can then check your interpretation with the museum's archaeologist. Guiding questions are posed through the dig to encourage deductions about the virtual site, with conclusions provided at the end of the tour. An illustrated glossary is a bonus."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Terry Lindquist, a National Elementary Teacher of the Year recognized by the National Council on Social Studies, helps others integrate compelling historical fiction into their social studies programs. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights based in Geneva, Switzerland hosts a site about a variety of human rights issues including religious intolerance, indigenous populations, children’s rights, torture, and racism. The topics include documents from various committees and a newsroom with archives of press releases and statements from UN officials. Documents are usually available in English, French, and Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Buckminster Fuller was always thinking ahead of his time, challenging us to see the big picture. Part of The Buckminster Fuller Institute hosts articles written by Hardin Tibbs and Mark Hertsgaard related to industrial ecology, sustainability, and going green for industry. The argument is that not only is sustainability necessary, it could be quite profitable too. Interesting ideas proposed include industrial ecosystems, multidimensional recycling and creating industries that are efficient and environmentally creative. Articles are in pdf format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Idealist Kids & Teens is designed to introduce young people to the nonprofit sector and give them the resources they need to get involved in their community. There are almost 50 areas of interest you can choose from including the environment, disabilities, hunger, homelessness, and health issues. Learn about kids who have already made a difference in their communities and have even started their own organizations. The teacher section provides online resources and lesson plans for service learning."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Illinois Alive! covers Illinois history for the century following statehood in 1818. The site focuses on 6 areas — including agriculture & business, Illinois authors, & the Civil War — and provides activities for teachers to use with both K-6 & 7-12 students. Most impressive are the site's rich collection of primary historical documents, including letters from Civil War veterans."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"You know how trying a family trip can be? How about a 24 year trip, traveling 24,000 miles with your father and uncle? The Metropolitan Museum of Art takes you on a journey along the route Marco Polo (1254–1324) began when he was 17, to the Mongol Empire of Genghis Khan. Your trip will be illustrated with art and artifacts at the Met, found in the map and Image Explorer (see “Continue the Adventure”)."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"While highlighting Tucson’s history, this site also represents some of the experiences of African Americans in the early U. S. Southwest. Stories, photographs, and other primary sources are featured, beginning with Esteban, an escaped Moroccan slave and 16th century explorer. African Americans moved west during the 1800s to work the railroads, to homestead, and to farm. One section presents Buffalo Soldiers, African Americans who fought in the US Cavalry against Native Americans. Biographies of pioneers, educators, the military, medical and legal professionals, among other occupations are collected. A special photographic exhibit features African American aviators. Lessons and activities geared to middle and high school students have been included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"INCORE (Internet Conflict Resolution) conducts research and policy work that is useful to the resolution of ethnic, political and religious conflicts. It is a joint venture between the University of Ulster and the United Nations University. The Country Guides profile hotspots in the world, including Web sites for further information, news sources in the region, articles and documents, related associations, and maps. Thematic resources are also available, such as women and conflict, landmines, refugees, and human rights. The majority of peace accords fail, usually due to failure of anticipating post-conflict problems, however the collection of peace agreements, often serve as a model for other peace agreements. There is no kids section to this site so the content is best understood by older high school students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Before 1788, there were approximately 700 languages spoken throughout Australia. Today, fewer than 2% of the Australian population is Indigenous. There are Kids FAQs, a glossary, information on Indigenous studies, and teacher resources, including curriculum guidelines and related links. Stories of the Dreaming features 20 stories from the cultures of Indigenous Australians, collected from all over Australia. The Background Information section has details about cultural heritage, family, social justice, and a timeline from pre-contact to the present. The site is from the Australian Museum Office. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Indivisible explores 12 communities in the United States through the eyes of photographers, folklorists, and radio producers. Each community is striving to make their community in the world better place to be. Each profile is accessible through The Gallery, where photos, a description of the community, and interviews with residents are housed. Interview transcripts are in PDF format, and audio interviews are in RealAudio format. The Resource section includes original audio tapes, interview logs and transcripts, select photographic prints and slides, and other primary and secondary source materials. An Educator’s Guide focuses on how images and personal narrative illustrate aspects of identity, community, and civic action."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United Nations provides this excellent online research tool for students of all ages. Students use a world map and online form to select up to seven countries (countries must be member states of the U.N.). Up-to-date statistical information for each country allows students to make comparisons of the countries they've selected and gather information about population, economy, area, and more. Available in French, Spanish, and English versions. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In 1962, African American James Meredith tried to enroll at the University of Mississippi which was an all white university. Violence ensued, two people died, but Meredith persisted and with the support of the Supreme Court and troops sent by President Kennedy, Meredith attended classes in the fall of 1962. A chronology provides the framework for the letters and audio clips of primary sources. Guided questions accompany many of the letters and other documents. Audio files require RealAudio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Archaeology Magazine takes you to virtual excavations in Pompeii, a Maya site named Waka’, and Mount Vernon where George Washington was a whiskey distiller. Each dig site gives facts, field notes, interviews with archaeologists and students, and a panorama view requiring Quicktime. Special features found in the different excavations discuss how to map a site, mystery objects, and even recipes. Not all dig sites are in deep jungles or foreign deserts, one is in Brooklyn and one is a Civil War prisoner of war camp site in Ohio. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Museums or historic sites participating in this project include the Japanese American Museum, District Six Museum (Cape Town, South Africa), Gulag Museum (Russia), and the Workhouse Museum (England). Each one is related to one or more contemporary human rights issues such as children as victims of war, genocide, human trafficking and slavery, sweatshops, totalitarianism, and state terrorism. Each featured museum has a brief overview, how the people represented by the museum are remembered, and resources about where a similar human rights issue is occurring today. The site is also written in Spanish, French, Russian, and German. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Court is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations, situated in the Peace Palace in The Hague (Netherlands). The Court settles cases of international law and gives opinions on legal questions for Member Nations of the United Nations. Recent cases include many related to former Yugoslavia and charges of genocide, oil platforms in Iran, and the 1988 airplane crash over Lockerbie, Scotland. In addition to current court cases, there is a booklet covering the history and jurisdiction of the Court as well as a current composition of members of the court with short biographies. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United Nations declared September 21 as the International Day of Peace. The Assembly declared that “the Day be observed as a day of global ceasefire and non-violence, an invitation to all nations and people to honor a cessation of hostilities during the Day.” If you want ideas of how you and your school can celebrate this special event, visit the highlights from prior years. Past U.N. Messengers of Peace include Jane Goodall, Elie Wiesel, and Wynton Marsalis. The site is also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, and Spanish. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The International Internet Encyclopedia, created by teachers and students from several different countries, houses primary and secondary resources, drawings, and diagrams, covering topics such as the soldiers, air war, war at sea, famous battles, life in the trenches, weapons and war machines, military tactics, inventors and scientists, political leaders, home front, issues and events, and statistics."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Museum of the African Diaspora has collected stories of adaptation, transformation, origins, and movement. A diaspora is a scattering of a people who have to settle far from their homelands. These stories about people of African descent have been collected to narrate episodes of adjustments and transformation in new cultures. Many tell of bigotry, misunderstanding, and grief, but others speak of family, pride and strength. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The James Madison Center houses extensive information about the fourth president related to the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and many other topics. The site index is the easiest way to find specific topics of interest. For students who prefer to learn or memorize by listening, the .wav files of each Amendment from this link: http://www.jmu.edu/madison/center/main_pages/material/audio/rights/rightsaudio.htm The Founders Quiz requires Java. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"It has been almost 400 years since the first European settlers arrived in Jamestown in May 1607. Few survived. Would you? The four themes to the site are Survival, Free Enterprise, Race Relations, and Democracy. The interactive journey titled “Stories of a Nation” is like a “choose your own adventure” allowing you to make decisions along the way. You do need to register, for free, to complete the journey. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Harvard Institute of Politics provides a searchable video archive of public addresses and panel discussions held at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum. Archives begin in 1978 and you can search or browse by year or topic and search for particular speakers. Hear Roslynn Carter discuss mental health issues, Desmond Tutu talking about human rights, and Richard Kleindienst offering a look back on Watergate. Some transcripts are available in PDF format. RealPlayer is required for the audio and video."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Explore the African American experience of segregation from the 1870s through the 1950s. Jim Crow laws were written to segregate blacks from whites in schools and public places, in marriage, health care, and public transportation, among other institutions. There are many lesson plans related to history, literature, and geography. Within the geography section, click on highlighted states to find specific Jim Crow laws. Historical simulations, cognitive organizers, mini quizzes, essay questions, primary source analysis and prediction centers are the interactive modules you’ll find under the teacher resources. In addition, there are narratives, an image gallery, and an encyclopedia."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Juneteenth celebrates the oldest known celebration of the ending of slavery. On June 19, 1865, two years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, Union soldiers notified Texans that slaves had been freed. The site provides a history and an online version of ""The Middle Passage"" by renowned illustrator Tom Feelings, which describes the slave trade."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The US Department of Justice has a kids' site that is divided into sections for elementary and secondary students. Topics common to both age groups are safety on the Internet and drug abuse. The elementary section includes The Working Dogs pages about chemical, explosive, and narcotics detection and search and rescue dogs. The secondary section houses information about crime detection including DNA testing, fingerprinting, and polygraph testing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Justice Learning site is an issue-based resource for students and teachers communicating how the United States Constitution and institutions of democracy shape everyday lives. Current topics include affirmative action, civil liberties, death penalty, free speech, gun control, juvenile justice, Web censorship, and zero tolerance. The site is sponsored by the New York Times Learning Network and Justice Talking from the National Public Radio. This site for high school students includes articles, editorials, and oral debate from journalists and experts. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Juvenile Justice Committee is part of the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association which advocates for changes in the juvenile justice system. Free publications that may be downloaded include: “Evolving Standards of Decency: The Juvenile Death Penalty in the United States,” Death Penalty Fact Sheets, and “Justice by Gender: The Lack of Appropriate Prevention, Diversion and Treatment Alternatives for Girls in the Juvenile Justice System.” Documents are in PDF format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Find information about various holidays all over the world. Browse by month, country, or holiday in the database; or, find tips for integrating multicultural holidays into your lesson plans with the site's curriculum resources."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Communities require planning to create and change them. This site will tell you about a city planner’s job and provides fun activities to get you thinking about building your own community. Activities include creating a crazy city story (like a MadLib), writing your own poem to describe your town, posting your own pictures or creative writing about your community, a bibliography of communities for K-middle school students, and a scavenger hunt that will get you started on investigating your own community. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Japanese American National Museum's web site for kids, called Bento Box (lunchbox), is filled with tasty treats about food like sushi, Japanese vegetables, and teriyaki. Try out the Taiko (big drum) game and watch the Kamishibai (paper story) theatre story about a young Japanese American boy who was made to go to an internment camp.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, encourages elementary students to ""meet cool people, see neat things, and visit awesome places."" The Cool People section includes volunteer opportunities for children, community helpers, and helping the homeless. The places to visit on a field trip are the park, library, and city hall. The things to see are the building a community game, the community scrambler game, and the Scavenger Hunt. ShockWave is required for the ""Build a Community"" activity."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Be a time traveler, put on a show for Queen Elizabeth I, or explore a shipwreck at the Kids Zone from the English Heritage site. There are hundreds of downloadable PDF documents about castles, Roman forts, abbeys, churches, stone circles and other historic landmarks. Even though most of us will never get to visit the real places, we can take a virtual tour of these sites.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"For some reason, the Korean War has been overlooked by several generations, yet there were 1.8 million Americans who went to Korea between 1950 to 1953 and almost 37,000 died there. This site from American Radio Works explores why this seems to have been a forgotten war. Several themes from the program are integrating the troops, homecoming, and combat stories. There are many interviews to hear along with transcripts. There is a set of maps indicating the North and South Korean territories over the course of the war. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Lyndon Johnson advocated for the Great Society beginning in 1964. ""The Great Society rests on abundance and liberty for all. It demands an end to poverty and racial injustice, to which we are totally committed in our time.” His Great Society addressed improvements in civil rights, education, the environment and housing. Current online exhibits include civil rights and the environment under the LBJ’s presidency and future exhibits will be about education, the war on poverty, and foreign policy. There is an interesting timeline of Johnson’s life where you can see major events in his life, who was president at a given time, and what new inventions were created. For example, he was only 12 years old when Band-Aids were invented. View the link to US Government to see what the landmark laws and programs of the Johnson administration like Head Start, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Medicare. RealPlayer is required for audio and video files. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Archived photos, artworks, and official records of the League of Nations are presented in this online collection from the Center for the Study of Global Change. The League of Nations was an international organization in existence from 1920-1946 in order to promote international co-operation and to achieve international peace and security. Photo albums and organizational charts of personalities, delegations, the Secretariat, and councils will assist students researching aspects of the League of Nations."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"As part of the USA Freedom Corps, the Learn & Serve America organization is for school aged students on service-learning, which combines service to the community with student learning. The goals of effective service-learning programs are to improve academic grades, increase attendance in school, and develop personal and social responsibility. The Students in Service to America Guidebook is found in the Resources for Programs section and may be ordered online or downloaded in PDF format. There is a link to the President's Volunteer Service Award site where you can keep track of your volunteer hours and earn an award. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Even if you can't visit Colonial Williamsburg in person, you can take a virtual field trip called The Loyalty or Liberty Web Adventure. It has activities for students, a glossary, teacher guide, and lesson plans. Other virtual trips address slavery, courts, and transportation during the colonial era. There are more free lesson plans with glossaries and graphic organizers. The History Explorer section provides biographical information about colonists and a virtual tour of Colonial Williamsburg's shops, houses and other historical buildings. You'll also find timelines and general information about life during the era in Experience Colonial Life. Be sure to see the Manners list, transcribed by George Washington as a teen. For example, rule 5 states: ""If You Cough, Sneeze, Sigh, or Yawn, do it not Loud but Privately."""

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, and the Tuskegee Airmen all hailed from Tuskegee, Alabama. These men were leaders in African American history during the 19th and 20th centuries. Washington was born a slave and after the Civil War was instrumental in establishing the local African American normal (teachers) school, later to become Tuskegee Institute. Carver was also a former slave, became an educator and scientist, specifically in agriculture. Washington hired Carver to teach at Tuskegee Institute. In the 1940s, the military selected Tuskegee Institute to train African American pilots and other aviation personnel. They became some of the most respected fighter pilots in World War II and helped pave the way to integration of the military. This site from the National Park Service has over 100 images and several recipes from George Washington Carver. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The educational materials at this site sponsored by the Department of the Interior include biographies of Lewis, Clark, and the more than thirty members of the Corps of Discovery. You can also read the original letter Jefferson wrote to Meriwether Lewis, including misspellings! Investigate the reflections written by Native Americans, poets, and historians in the People, Land, and Water Special Issue titled “The Lewis & Clark Bicentennial: Many Voices – One Journey – Join Us”. The Follow the Trail features signature events of the re-enactment of the Corps of Discovery trip from Monticello in 2003 to the Pacific Coast, scheduled for 2006. Check the schedule to see if the expedition will be near your town in the next months. The site links to specific locations along the trail, lesson plans, online activities, maps, and journals. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Auschwitz-Birkenau was the largest German complex of concentration, extermination, and forced labor camps. 1,100,000 Jews and thousands of others were exterminated at Auschwitz. Thousands were forced on death marches as the Soviet troops advanced in January 1945. Soviet troops liberated the remaining prisoners, most suffering from severe malnutrition and disease, on January 27, 1945. This site from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum commemorates the 60th anniversary of the liberation. An animated map feature includes a short narration of the camp history, layout, and accompanying photos. There is film footage after the Soviets liberated the camp and wrenching testimony from survivors. Transcripts from the survivors are included after a short biography. RealPlayer is required for the video clips. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"A humorous discussion of topics in this “short attention span history” of Shakespeare’s era in England is full of fun factoids. You’ll learn about money, food, religion, among other everyday topics of naming the baby, snack foods (pretzels and bagels!), and schooling. Aren’t you glad your school day doesn’t start at 6 am in the summer and ends at 5:30? Don’t miss the manners in the Childhood section, where you should “Sup not loud of thy pottage” and “Scratch not thy head with thy fingers, nor spit you over the table”."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In 1957, nine black students went to a formerly all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas. The Governor of Arkansas called in the National Guard, but a Federal Judge ordered the Guard to permit the black students to attend the school. President Eisenhower ordered the Guard to maintain order and complete the integration process. You can read issues of the school newspaper from that year and learn what became of each of the Little Rock Nine. RealTime is required to view the historic videos."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"To mark the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 to integrate schools, National Public Radio hosted a series of broadcasts. NPR has posted the audio files, photos and interviews related to Thurgood Marshall, the first African American on the Supreme Court, the “separate but equal” argument, and results from experiments recording black children's responses to black and white dolls which impacted the court’s decision. To find the additional resources, click on the title of each feature. Audio clips are in Real Player or Windows Media Player. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"New York PBS station WNET produced this site in collaboration with the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, the first tenement building preserved as a national landmark. Visitors to the site will be able to look at immigrant life in many decades through virtual rooms in an online tenement house. Interviews, family histories, and other material is also included in the site (be warned: the site design employs numerous frames). Educators in the New York area should contact the museum to learn about its innovative, community-based educational outreach programs. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"National Geographic has an interactive map of over 5,000 U.S. Civil War battlefields and historic sites. Using the map, find some of the 384 major battlefields with descriptions from the Civil War Preservation Trust and National Park Service by clicking on the green or yellow dots pinpointing war events. Most of the maps are topographic so understanding how to read maps can enlighten students regarding military positions on hills, river banks, and other landforms."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Searching National Geographic's MapMachine by place name provides atlas maps; dynamic maps, which show topographical features; and flags and facts. In addition the site has a tutorial on cartography and Eye in the Sky satellite images of Earth from space. Teachers and students can also customize and print black line maps."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Recent events in the news, where are they taking place? Can you find your way around Iraq, London, Sudan (Darfur) or Afghanistan? These maps are historic and modern, some of cities and towns, and some are thematic maps such as the major ethnoreligious groups of Iraq and Iraq’s oil infrastructure. Maps are generally in html or pdf format. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The University of Aberdeen’s Marischal Museum allows you to wander the exhibits from your home, sometimes even giving you the opportunity to turn objects around to see them from all sides. Many objects are related to Scottish history, and if you like old swords and other weapons, you’ll enjoy this visit. Photos of artifacts can be expanded and each has a description of its use or importance. Use the index to find specific objects, or use the floor plan to find the 3D elements, where you use QuickTime to rotate objects."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"No matter what your opinion is of the war in Iraq, the lives of soldiers and their families is the important piece of the American RadioWorks report “Married to the Military”. There is an hour long audio show, a transcript, reporter’s notebook, an audio diary of a military wife, and a feature on the Fort Bragg Army town Fayetteville, North Carolina. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In a time when women faced severe limits, Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) rose from obscurity, poverty, and illness to become a renowned author, healer, thinker, religious leader, and publisher. She founded the Christian Science Monitor, which is known for fair, clean, constructive, and insightful reporting. Eddy was a pioneer in the field of mind-body medicine and was a promoter of women's rights along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"A site from BBC Education presents medicine from prehistory through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution, and the Modern World. Don’t miss the barber-surgeon section of the Gory Story, it will make you grateful to live in a time of modern medical practices. Helpful hints in the pupil notes section are geared toward a British exam for high school students, but the advice offered on how to answer essay questions is useful to any high school student. The Library houses lesson plans and images for downloading. From the main page, take time to read the How to Use information. The site can be viewed in a non-interactive format or in an enhanced animated format using Flash with fun activities such as Step Back in Time. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies hosts a site about migrations of people, objects, culture, and ideas. According to the site, it features ""the stories and artifacts of migration--what happens when people move, what they take with them, what they leave behind, and how they make their new place home."" The different people highlighted are from each continent, pioneers, explorers, and nomadic people. Some specific peoples include the Romani and Rastafarians."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Created by the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, this site includes sections of biographical information about Thomas Jefferson, the plantation, the house, and the grounds. Resources on the Hemings-Jefferson relationship are highlighted. Throughout the site are interesting quotes, anecdotes, recipes, images, and glimpses into the daily life of Jefferson, the farmer and architect. Added interests are the clickable rooms of the floor plan, which give dimensions, diagrams, and architectural features of this fascinating house."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Mount Vernon, George Washington's home, houses educational resources addressing his life and the historical era in which he lived. The main Mount Vernon site allows you to tour the grounds so be sure to stop in the kitchen for Martha Washington's cake that calls for 40 eggs! There is a recipe also for hoecakes. The Frequently Asked Questions section will dispel some myths about Washington, including his wooden false teeth, the silver dollar across the Potomac, and the cherry tree story. You can even send an electronic trading card of George."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This web site presents interviews with more than 300 people living in mountain and highland regions around the world. You can select interviews by country: Mexico, Peru, Lesotho, Kenya, Ethiopia, Poland, Pakistan, India, Nepal, and China. You can also search by theme, including agriculture, communications, conflict, culture and customs, economics, education, social institutions, and traditional skills. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Gods and goddesses from many cultures have been used to describe heavenly bodies like the sun, moon, and planets. This site from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research has descriptions of how these objects in the sky have been depicted by Greek, Roman, Norse, Celt, Hindu, Aztec, and Egyptian cultures. There is a Spanish version of the site, and the text is altered for beginner, intermediate, and advanced readers. Java is required for the Mythology Hangman game."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"“The object of the game is to put the ball into your opponent's goal.” According to this site, James Naismith had 14 days to create an indoor game that would provide an ""athletic distraction"" for a rowdy class through the brutal New England winter. The result is one of the most popular sports in the world. Naismith laid out 13 original rules which are found here. There are short biographies of over 200 Hall of Fame inductees. Basketball history, Men’s and Women’s NCAA tournament results and NBA Leading scorers are listed under the History heading. Don’t miss the online exhibit Freedom to Play: The Life and Times of Basketball’s African-American Pioneers at: http://www.hoophall.com/exhibits/freedom_to_play_menu.htm "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Entering the Museum section will take you to exhibits about Napoleon's Great Maneuvers at the army's training camp, anti-Napoleon propaganda, and a report on the building of the Suez Canal. The Documents and Information Center contains additional resources but remember to take time for the fun and games. There are some jigsaw puzzles that you can put together to create a famous painting. You can also send a Napoleonic postcard via email. The recipe for Chicken Marengo looks especially good!"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The site opens with an audio clip of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s ""I Have a Dream"" speech. The interactive tour of the museum, housed in the hotel where King was assassinated, highlights people and organizations who fought for equal rights, the Civil War, civil rights acts, the migration north, Jim Crow Laws, gaining the vote, the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, and Freedom marches."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Sharpen your geography skills! There is still time to sign up for the 2002 Geography Bee! The deadline is December 14, so students in grades four through eight should get ready to take the challenge! The Bee Basics will get you started, the Champs from the past decade offer words of advice, and the Olympiad tells about an international competition in 2003. There is a link to the Geo-Bee Challenge, where you can test your geography skills against five new questions each day from previous Geography Bee contests."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Priorities Project focuses on the impacts of federal tax and spending policies at the community level on human services, including education and child welfare, housing, health care and the environment. The interactive database can be used to find how much of your annual tax payment goes to military spending, education, payment on national debt, and other expenditures. You can select state or issue to see how the national budget can impact where you live. Did you know that if you paid $1000.00 in taxes in 2002, $226 would go to pay interest on the national debt and $32 would go to education? Use the interactive income tax chart for more surprises. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"NPR was created as a private, non-profit organization to provide leadership in national newsgathering and production and to provide the first permanent nationwide interconnection of non-commercial stations. The site has archives of the daily news, special features, musical selections, talk shows, and even Click and Clack with Car Talk. With RealAudio, QuickTime, or Windows Media, you can listen to the news from your computer."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"As the title clearinghouse indicates, the National Service-Learning Clearinghouse provides pointers and resources for multiple projects, topics, and audiences related to service learning. Fact sheets and hot topics for K-12 cover service learning, character education, citizenship, impacts and policies of service learning, and curriculum ideas. Tool kits in PDF format may be downloaded and provide information and strategies for practitioners, teachers, student leaders, administrators, and community activists interested in creating or enhancing service-learning programs. If you are just getting started in service learning projects or are looking for new resources, this is the place to begin."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site is developed by the Cincinnati Enquirer to inform the public about the struggle to abolish slavery and to teach lessons of courage from the Underground Railroad. Includes project news; programs and exhibits, history; and Internet links to the National Park Service, other UGRR sites, and other general interest sites."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College presents this Web site all about Native American foods, native herbs, and Native American cultures. Teachers and students will find recipes using native plants and animals; herbal remedies; nutrition information; and more. The majority of information resides on the college server, but there are some links to outside sites as well. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Do you think you could answer these questions? Immigrants who want to become naturalized citizens of the United States need to pass this test of 100 questions related to the history and government of the country. You can use the self test which provides a random selection of multiple choice questions from the whole list, then check your answers to see if you are right. Need to brush-up on your civics? Try the study guides for US history and government, they are great summaries to help study for a test in school. Some materials are in PDF format."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Ned Kelly is a legend in Australia, considered a criminal by some and a folk hero by others. Kelly and his gang were bushrangers, horse and cattle rustlers, bank robbers and murderers. Something that made the gang famous was that they were clad in iron armor toward the end of their outbreak of crime. The gang was killed and Kelly was hanged in 1880 although thousands of people petitioned for his release. This exhibit serves as an insight to the Australian bush settlers and their conflict with police in the late 1880s. These primary documents would appeal to the adventurous spirit of some students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute provides a database of photographs; political cartoons; and texts such as speeches, letters, and other historic documents from the New Deal period. Curriculum related themes and lesson plans for middle and high school students are featured about many aspects of the Depression. Topics include student activism in the 1930s, African Americans in the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the TVA. Especially moving are letters from children to Mrs. Roosevelt asking for clothing and money."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Listen to clips of songs like When the Saints Go Marching In and Who’s Sorry Now as you browse the New Orleans Jazz Park created to foster preservation, education, and interpretation of jazz as it evolved in New Orleans. There is background information about history including maps of jazz neighborhoods, featuring Louis Armstrong. The Kids Page has a downloadable Junior Ranger activity book in pdf format. Audio clips are .wav files. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Picture Collection Online can search by keyword or browse by image title, subject, creator, and source. There are classroom ideas in arts, language arts, social studies, and science that will help integrate the collection of over 30,000 images representing New York City history and culture, historical clothing, insects, Native Americans, dragons, and snakes. The library has also created some Webquests found in the Help section. Activity sheets in the Webquests are in .pdf format. You can also create your own gallery of images."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The New York Transit Museum includes a series of online activities like designing and printing your own mosaic masterpiece just like the mosaics that are in many of New York’s subway stations. You can play the classic concentration game with MTA tokens and signs. One feature allows you to magnify and inspect transit tokens with a virtual magnifying glass. Java is required for some sections.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This elegantly designed site is the online companion to the Freedom Forum's museums in Virginia, New York, and California. Visitors to the site will find information about Newscapade, the museum's traveling exhibit program; exhibits currently showing at the museum; and lesson plans and other educational materials. Two online, interactive exhibits are ""The Adventures of Chip Tracer, Cyber Journalist,"" an animated look at the top stories of all time; and ""The Top 100 Stories,"" in which viewers can compare their own ranking of the century's newsworthy events with the rankings of noted journalists. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Carnegie Museum of Natural History offers this beautifully designed and informative site which explores the Native American relationship to the natural environment. The site profiles four representative tribes: The Tlingit of coastal Alaska; the Hopi of the desert southwest; the Iroquois of the northeast; and the plains-dwelling Lakota. Each profile contains information about the culture, environment, and history of each tribe through text and images; suggested teaching resources are also listed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Clerk is an officer in the United States House of Representatives. Explore the role the Office of the Clerk plays in the U.S. House of Representatives. Learn about the legislative process and its effect on you. A full glossary is found in the Learning Center and key terms are defined on pages where they appear. The Learning Center also includes information about American Government, House Members, House Committees, House Leadership, House History, and how laws are made. The Fun and Games section has trivia, coloring pages, puzzles, and writing a simulated bill online. A special area for teachers and parents includes a lesson plan on how a bill becomes a law, a clickable map of Capitol Hill, planning a trip to the Capitol, and other educational resource links."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Primary resources about Ohio history from more than 250 libraries, museums, archives and historical societies are collected at this site. You can search for subjects like Marietta, the first settlement of the Northwest Territory, the Underground Railroad, and Native Americans. There are items dating from prehistory to 1903, including letters, diaries, historical photographs, clothing, furniture, prehistoric artifacts and government records. An enhanced feature is the ability to create your own scrapbook by selecting and annotating specific items in the database. Featured scrapbooks include Women’s History Month, Black History Month, and Ohio presidents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The One Room School House Project is a database of information, pictures, and stories about the almost 900 one room schoolhouses in the United States. There are also articles about one room schools and the people who used to teach and attend them. Students will be interested to compare the school from a century ago to their current school experience."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Women Working, 1800-1930 Teacher Resource Pages provides primary sources focusing on women's roles in the United States economy. These digitized historical, manuscript, and image resources were specifically selected for use in the classroom. You'll find a section on immigration, soap and cleanliness, childhood and child labor, household conveniences, and natural sciences. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

After World War II, about a thousand Jewish orphans immigrated to Canada as a result of the Holocaust. The exhibit from Virtual Museum Canada uses photos and accompanying stories to present the situation before the war, the Holocaust, liberation, displaced persons camps, trying to gain entrance to another country, the journey to a new home, and building a new life. Read the stories of eight survivors in complete transcripts found in the Learning Resources. A glossary and teacher guide is provided. The site is also available in French.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Follow current court cases or research cases from the past at this site. The Project provides abstracts and other materials for leading constitutional law cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States. You can find out what happened on this day in the history of the Supreme Court, take a QuickTime tour of the building, and find information on all the justices in the history of the United States. Did you know that Sandra Day O'Connor grew up on a ranch and had a bobcat for a pet? In case you were wondering, ""Oyez"" is the word the Marshal of the Court uses to call the courtroom to order."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The historical episodes of influenza outbreaks are discussed at this Centers for Disease Control site. Highlighted flu epidemics are the 1918 Spanish Flu, where 20 million people died, the 1957 Asian Flu, the 1976 Swine Flu, and the 1997 Avian Flu. This site also presents information about the basics of influenza, the phases of a pandemic, vaccine development and preparations for the next pandemic."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"These accounts of explorers in Canada include the Vikings, the first Europeans proven to have crossed the Atlantic Ocean and to have lived in North America. Beginning with the land bridge the ancestors of Canada's First Nations and Inuit crossed to come to North America and through the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, travel the routes with explorers such as Roald Amundsen, James Cook, and George Vancouver. Some were looking for the Northwest Passage to Asia, others were looking for trading goods, or even mapping a new land. Interesting highlights titled “Yuck” on various pages tell of problems with food on voyages of long ago. Glossary, maps, and lesson plans supplement the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Antique and modern board games, rules, and strategies reflect society in this exhibit from Cornell. There are games related to women’s suffrage, moral character development, parody (Monotony is a funny take-off of Monopoly), and sometimes intellectual challenge. The way to navigate the site is select a topic from the left and exhibits within each topic are on the images to the right. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Pack your bags, it is time to join Traveler the dog on a world tour! Find out what it is like to be a Peace Corps volunteer and make a difference in the world. What is a typical day like? What would you pack? What is school like in different countries? Peace Corps volunteers talk about these questions and about the food and holidays of many countries they visit. Pack Your Bags is a game where you can go to Ecuador or South Africa, answer a series of questions and earn a certificate as a Peace Corps Pal. Teacher resources are available in the section What is the Peace Corps. The game requires Shockwave version 8."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This ThinkQuest site from elementary students states: ""Some world leaders have helped to promote world peace and some have done the opposite. Either way, these leaders have shaped our history and they continue to shape our future."" Profiles of admirable leaders (Jimmy Carter, Nelson Mandela, Lech Walesa) and infamous leaders (Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin) are given and to test your memory, try the crossword puzzle or matching game. A section on how to be a leader gives easily understandable definitions for an elementary student. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This rich site, produced by members of Tufts University's Classics Department, provides visitors with a wealth of information about the classical Western world. The site includes an atlas, encyclopedia, introductory essays to ancient Greek and Roman life, English-to-Greek and English-to-Latin dictionaries, classic texts, and images of art and archaeology. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Based on an exhibition at the National Archives and Records Administration, the photos in the Galleries represent major eras of the past century: A New Century, The Great War and the New Era, The Great Depression and the New Deal, A World in Flames, Postwar America, and Century's End. The Portfolios are from fames photographers like Lewis Hine and Dorothea Lange. Most of these photos are striking and catpure the mood of these major eras in United States history."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Har, matey! Climb aboard the National Geographic High Seas Adventure and play a type of ""choose your own adventure"" story. You select your pirate character, your ship, and your treasure. Once you have survived one adventure, try it again for another voyage. Other topics are about pirate ports, books for young buccaneers, and a story about Blackbeard. You can learn about the Whydah, the first authenticated pirate wreck ever found, and be linked to another National Geographic section about the Whydah. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"It doesn’t have to be Thanksgiving to have fun learning about early European settlers and Native Americans in Plimoth. Try a recipe from the Wampanoag (succotash) and the English Colonists (pompions – pumpkin or squash). Games you can make yourself are a toss-and-catch game made from a vine and stick, and the Game of Fox and Geese played with pebbles or other small objects on a game board drawn in the dirt. Stories, “pilgrim speech”, riddles, and coloring pictures are also included. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Women’s History Museum hosts an online exhibit chronicling the demand for women’s right to vote in 1848 to 72 years later when women finally won that right. There are many images of buttons, ribbons, photos, posters, broadsides, and other graphics related to women’s suffrage. Many of these icons were of Inez Milholland (“The Woman on the Horse”), idealized mothers, and winged heralds, most using the color gold as a symbol of suffrage. In the first pages of the exhibit is a link to the full text of “The Declaration of Sentiments” from the 1848 Seneca Falls Woman's Rights Convention. There is also a timeline and quiz."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"When Mt. Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, Pliny was there to document what he saw. This site from the Chicago Field Museum brings the art, history, and death of inhabitants to the Web. Plaster and resin casts of families and even a dog that perished in Pompeii show us the final setting of their lives. Other towns near the volcano, Herculaneum and Oplontis, are also highlighted in images of architecture and art. The interactive timeline lets you click on each town or era and view details of excavation maps and volcanic activity."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Resources for middle and high school educators from the Population Reference Bureau include resource guides and lesson plans, like the currently important topic of Populations in the Path of Natural Hazards. The resource guides are data sheets, activities, and slides, many in PDF format. Lessons are correlated to National Council for the Social Studies and National Geography standards. The site content is also available in French and Spanish."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Smithsonian Institution offers this impressive online exhibition of posters depicting noteworthy events and movements in American culture. The site includes over 100 posters and accompanying text from the exhibit curator; a terrific extension of American history using the visual arts!

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Indigenous people of the West Coast of British Columbia, the Kwakwaka’wakw, have a tradition of “potlatch” to hold an important event where great feasts and many gifts are distributed. In the days before Western contact, gifts could be button blankets, canoes, or cedar bark hats. Today’s gifts might be t-shirts, food, or coffee mugs. Displaying a copper was a way to mark a family’s importance. You can make your own virtual copper with a game. Another game at the site is a Mask game where you try to match the mask with the animal it represents. Supplementary materials include a Bighouse floorplan by anthropologist Franz Boas, a salmon recipe, and seven lesson ideas. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Do you think a family of four can live on $17,030? According to the US government, that is above poverty level. Why do you think people in the United States are poor? Read the results of a survey on the nation's poor conducted by National Public Radio, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Interesting results indicate poverty is not necessarily related to money, but sometimes to happiness. This study touches on a number of important issues making it a must-read for high school social studies classes."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Test your knowledge of the presidents by answering multiple choice questions correctly to advance you around the baseball diamond. As in baseball, three wrong answers and you are out. You can choose pitch difficulty from an easy slow curve to a hard sinker. The site takes a while to load on slower connections but it is worth the wait. High scores are reset monthly, see if you can make it to this month's list of top 10 scores! This is a companion site to Oyez Baseball, http://baseball.oyez.org/ , a similar game related to Justices of the Supreme Court. Both games require Flash 5 or higher."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Listen to Presidents Ford, Carter, and George H. W. Bush as they discuss their views of the U. S. Constitution with journalist Cokie Roberts for WHYY in Philadelphia. Article II of the Constitution is the major topic of the conversations, and the common themes the three former presidents discuss include the Cold War, secrecy, separation of powers, veto power, pardons, and war powers. There are transcripts of the interviews in PDF format and the audio tape in RealPlayer. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Congressional Research Service created a report which describes the four stages of the presidential election process: the pre-nomination primaries and caucuses for selecting delegates to the national conventions; the national nominating conventions; the general election; and voting by members of the electoral college to choose the President and Vice President. The report provides great background for any high school student taking a government class. This 53 page document is in PDF format.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Meet Art, his friend, and family through the letters they wrote from 1943-1946. Click on the calendar to read letters written on the highlighted dates and use the dog tags on the screen to visit different sections of the site. In Private Art Remembers, you will read the stories behind the letters. In the Meet the Private section, you can click on the Jukebox and hear songs of the war era. Be sure to listen to Spike Jones sing Der Fueher's Face. RealAudio is required for selections in the Jukebox."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"You might not expect to see the names of Jimmy Carter and Newt Gingrich as founding board members of any organization, but politicians of all beliefs are supporting Project Vote-Smart. It is a volunteer driven service that provides information on over 12,000 candidates for public office. You can find voting records, campaign finances, position statements, backgrounds, and the evaluations of candidates by over 100 competing special interest groups. You can also track legislation and find your own political representatives."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Harry Truman made the decision to drop the Atomic bombs in Japan, ordered the desegregation of the armed forces, oversaw the Berlin Airlift and Marshall Plans, and recognized the State of Israel. With RealPlayer, you can hear speeches such as the broadcast to the American people announcing the surrender of Germany in 1945. With sections for elementary students, secondary students, and teachers, this site is full of Truman political cartoons, trivia, photos, and online documents. Lesson plans are found in the teacher section. A fun section in the Trivia portion of the site is looking through Truman's desk calendar to see what was happening on a particular day, where you can check your birthday, today, or an eventful day in history."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Public Agenda is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and citizen education organization With the mission to help students understand the major issues facing the nation. ""Clarifying Issues 2000"" is the Internet election guide that presents issues the candidates are debating and helps young people think through how the election could affect them, their families, and their communities."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Two minute sound portraits of the planet track the rhythms of nature and culture worldwide, blending interviews and natural sound. Feature stories include audio, video, photos, and text to accompany each story. Sound clips include natural sounds, music, and other man-made sounds. You can search the archives by keyword or browse the topics Nature, Culture, and Science. Transcripts of each two-minute show accompanied the audio clips. Real Player or Windows Media Player is required for audio and video clips."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

This web site is the quiz capital of the Internet. You can take quizzes and play educational games in over 40 subject areas (though the site is weighted heavily toward foreign language and geography). Simple step by step instructions also make it easy to create your own online games and quizzes.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"World maps, continent maps, country maps, maps to color, flag facts, a world fact book, demographic information, and much more..."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"There are many revolutionary ideas presented in this collection, beginning with Confucious, but the focus on American culture highlights two seminal works: “What is an American?” by Crevecoeur, and “Democracy in America” by Alexis de Tocqueville. Other documents related to American history include “A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America” written by John Adams and Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense.” Learning activities for secondary school students are included from this site created by the University of Maine at Farmington. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

National Geographic features an exhibit about Pearl Harbor with a multimedia map and timeline where you can see photos and videos, hear eyewitness accounts, and go moment to moment from before 4 a.m. when a periscope is first sighted to twelve hours later when the Japanese carriers started their journey home. A detailed listing of ships and planes and assigned targets is provided.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Do you know what your shopping choices supports? When you buy something from Amazon, Disney, The Gap, do you know how they stand on issues like human rights, sweatshops, the environment, ethics, and diversity? This site has compiled complaints and praise for many large companies. In each company profile, you also find out what other brands that company owns(did you know that The Gap owns Old Navy and the Banana Republic clothing stores?). You can compare companies by type, such as clothing, food, and toys, to see how they rank on social and environmental practices. Research issues range from animal testing to child labor and outsourcing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Pew Internet and American Life Project has been collecting data and publishing reports for years, and this specific report about Web 2.0 discusses social networking, blogs, wikis, or other participatory activities on the Web. The report gives background on related activities such as using the Web for sharing creative works or other files, rating a product or service, blogging, or social sites like MySpace.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Written for students studying the Roman Empire from 753 BC to 1453 AD, this site from the BBC provides introductory material, supplementary activities, games, quizzes, a timeline, and a glossary. Subjects include the City of Rome, Invasion, Rebellion, the Roman Defense of Britain, the Roman Army, Roads and Places, Leisure, Family and Children, Technology, Religion, and Roman Remains. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Children can learn the basics about US savings bonds — what they are, what they look like, and why people buy them. Two short games are available for downloading, and a list of ""site resources"" provides access to more advanced information for older students."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"School prayer is the topic of this film from 1999. While the video can be rented or checked out from a library, you don’t need to see the film to read some background on the debate about prayer in schools. The story covers a family’s fight to remove school sponsored prayer over the intercom and Bible study classes from their public school. You can see the pro and con points of view, the final court ruling, and outside links to other school prayer and separation of church and state documents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Meet over 200 career professionals at this site about career development for 7-12th grade students, teachers, and parents. The text is enhanced with video, photos and interactive activities. The goal of the site is to introduce students to careers by helping them identify their own interests and plan for their futures. Each profile presents what the professional enjoys about the job as well as challenges. Featured occupations are in health, engineering, business, agriscience, human services and the arts. Career searches can be done by keyword, occupation, subject or Career Pathway. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"What IS a ""social entrepreneur""? It is a leader who is responsive to social issues by combining innovation, resourcefulness and opportunity. You can read profiles of social entrepreneurs by selecting a continent and a variety of fields such as agriculture, energy, health, fair trade, and waste management. Each profile describes the innovation and strategy of the entrepreneur to create a business that enhances society in some way. Examples include Millard and Linda Fuller, founders of Habitat for Humanity, and Alan Khazei and Michael Brown who started ""City Year"" to have young adults serve 10 months in a voluntary national service program. The site is available in Spanish and French. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Organized in a set of books and chapters, this online publication from the University of Victoria in Canada covers Shakespeare’s life, society, history, and politics. One section covers the background of ideas at the time of religion, the supernatural, education, and the medieval universe. Specific topics in society include country life, city life, family, and the roles of husbands and of wives. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Don't know much about geography? Let this map site help you learn in an interactive arena. Maps are divided into political, physical, and historical topics. Historical topics are Europe during three eras and the World in 1800. Activities range from beginner to intermediate to advanced with optional quizzes on different difficulty levels. Take the time to read the directions, you'll learn how to use each type of map. Shockwave is required for the entire site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Silk Road is the trade and human migration route between China and the Middle East. Materials traded included silk, jade, herbs, and horses. Major themes of the site from AskAsia are geography, history, religion, art, trade, and music. Resources from the exhibit are readings, music, maps, a glossary, and art. Lesson plans for elementary through high school students are available. (The site design has changed since this annotation was written, you will need to do a search on Silk Road to find the above lessons and background essays.)"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Perfect for social studies classes, this site from Geographica takes you to the Sinai Desert and the Bedouin people who live there. Topics covered include how the Sinai is related to the Bible, information about scuba diving in the Red Sea, and national parks. Supplemental materials include a timeline, maps, and Bedouin music. Audio clips require Real Audio."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee was created to coordinate sit-ins, freedom rides, voter registration, and other means of nonviolent protest to promote equality for blacks. Their peaceful responses to violent oppression were key to gaining support for their cause. Other major issues covered at the site are Black Power, white liberalism, feminism, and the war in Vietnam. Audio clips include pieces from Julian Bond, Fannie Lou Hamer, and two protest songs. Note that the audio takes time to load, give it a few moments. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Spend time listening and watching the introduction to the site for a brief overview of apartheid in South Africa: the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990, the negotiation between Mandela and De Klerk to institute free elections, resulting in the election of Mandela in 1994 and an end to apartheid. This site addresses some changes that have taken place in the ten years since independence. Navigation is a bit tricky. There are seven themes: women, youth, integration, housing, music, economics, and insights. Click on the photo for a theme then choose a photo depicting a subcategory which appears to the right of the main photo. Under the Insights section, click on the timeline and mouse over the barbed wire to change the dates. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Invisible ink, letters hidden in the quill of a pen, “mask” letters, captured letters, secret codes, all were used during the Revolutionary War. Most people have heard of the traitor Benedict Arnold, but in this site, you’ll also meet Miss Jenny, John André, and other spies for the British. A timeline and a map with routes of spy or intercepted messages supplement the images and text of letters."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History has a site about the origins and history of the flag and the flag's symbolism. You will see behind the scenes work by the conservation team trying to preserve the Star-Spangled Banner from age, pollution and the elements. Enjoy the section called ""You Solve the Mystery"" in which you investigate primary sources to figure out mysteries about the flag, and then see what some historians deduced."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Consortium for Policy Research in Education investigated and compiled results for each state on topics related to assessment, accountability, performance standards, and identifying and assisting low performing schools and districts. Each state department of education verified the data presented. Adobe Acrobat is required to read the state reports."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"United Nations Population Fund publishes a report on the state of the world population related to themes such as reproductive health, adolescent health, and how population affects the environment. Archives of these reports are available from 1996 to the present. Several of these are also in French and Spanish. Click on a specific report and you may also find it available in Arabic and Russian. Another feature of the site are population issues which include preventing HIV infection, promoting gender equity, and humanitarian responses to crises such as the Asian tsunami in 2004."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Compiled by the Census Bureau, the Statistical Abstract contains a collection of statistics on social, political, and economic conditions in the United States. There are also selected data for individual states, metropolitan areas, cities, and foreign countries from reports and records of government and private agencies. Many charts and tables are included, with an extensive index."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"An online exhibit from the Pennsylvania Historical Society looks at the ways different groups of immigrants have tried to prove that they belong, often in the face of harassment from earlier arrivals. The exhibit covers the period from the revolutionary era to the present. African Americans and recently arrived Irish were promised citizenship if they fought in the Civil War, although that promise wasn’t always kept. During the World Wars, German immigrants were compelled to renounce their cultures to prove their “Americanism”. African Americans and women are noted as challenging their second-class citizenship in the latter half of the 20th century. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Department of State posts a collection of essays in the electronic journal, eJournal USA: Issues of Democracy, which explains how the Supreme Court functions. There are brief summaries of landmark Supreme Court decisions, a bibliography, and an introduction to the roles of the Court clerk, the marshal, the reporter of decisions, and the public information officer. The journal is also available in Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Arabic and can be downloaded as a 42 page PDF.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This organization's mission is to ""help peoples defend their lives, protect their lands, and determine their own futures."" The section titled Tribal World lets you explore tribes in the Americas, Africa, and Asia/Australia for a total of 80 tribes in 34 countries. Each continent links to facts about a culture, such as the Bushmen in Botswana, with a map indicating their location, the problems they currently face, photos, and video clips (requiring Real Player). "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester hosts an online exhibition with letters, photos, memorabilia and papers from Susan B. Anthony and some of her colleagues. AnthonyÂ’s circle included Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Lucretia Mott, and Frederick Douglass. The timeline of AnthonyÂ’s life and work is illustrated with multiple primary documents and personal letters.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"One of the most valuable rights of a citizen is the right to vote. The percentage of young adults who vote continues to decline. In 1972 (the year 18-year-olds became eligible to vote) 55 percent of 18-24 year olds voted. In the 2000 election, only 42 percent chose to do so. This site from the nonpartisan, nonprofit Council for Excellence in Government, encourages parents to vote and to take their children along. Activities for elementary, middle, and high school students are available where kids are urged to become active with their families and community voting and by being critical viewers of political ads. Facts on voting relate how many eligible voters actually registered and voted by age group in the 2000 and previous elections. As the site says, ""democracy is not a spectator sport!"" "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The site provides an overview of the people and events of the Holocaust through photographs, documents, art, music, movies, and literature. Navigate through the site via a timeline, protagonists, or the arts. Teacher resources include activities for elementary, middle, and high school students. There are a wide variety of resources and formats to be found, some require plug-ins. Be aware that many images are very disturbing."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The National Archives and Records Administration hosts a self-paced U. S. Constitution Workshop for grades 4-12, based on national standards. Students examine primary source documents and complete document analysis worksheets intended to guide their understanding of each document's constitutional relevance. The document analysis worksheets are for written documents, artifacts, cartoons, maps, motion pictures, photos, posters, and sound recordings.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP) uses properties listed in the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places to enliven history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects. TwHP is aimed at middle school students but can be expanded to all grade levels by adapting the lesson plans available at the site. Each lesson plan also is tied to United States History Standards for grades 5-12. There are over 20 themes, including African American History, Back to School, and Pioneer America. Each lesson provides teacher information and activities for students. The lessons are enhanced by maps, images, and historical context related to the location."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Students at Mt. Rainier High School in Washington developed this site in cooperation with the Washington State Attorney General's Office in 1997. The site is written, researched, and hosted by teens, for teens. It includes useful information on topics like telemarketers, get-rich-quick schemes, credit cards, buying cars, car repair, music clubs, and health clubs. It also explains how teens can file consumer complaints. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed pioneers to settle on a piece of land, farm it, and eventually it became their own property. Most of these settlers lived in sod houses, collected buffalo chips (manure) for fuel, and hauled water until they could build wells that were later pumped by windmills. Mattie is a woman we meet through her letters home to her parents while she and her family homesteaded. In addition to letters,there are photos, maps, broadsides, and other documents. Classroom activities are suggested. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Even before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, 15 year old Claudette Colvin and 18 year old Mary Louise Smith were arrested for refusing to relinquish their seats to white passengers. The Montgomery Advertiser (newspaper) presents a site about the Montgomery Bus Boycott with video clips of everyday people in the movement, a timeline, newspaper front pages, and historic articles from 1955-1957. Windows Media Player is required for the video clips of interviews with 25 people who were involved with the boycott."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Over 60 years ago, a civil war was raging in Spain, affecting millions of civilians, including children. This collection of artwork by children is a digital representation of a book published in 1938 before the war ended. The Spanish Civil War was the first modern war waged against a civilian population with planes, tanks, and personnel from fascist Germany and Italy. These children were depicting Hitler’s bombers years before World War II began. Drawings are mostly of wartime and refugee camps, but also of peacetime. Each image is captioned in Spanish and English. Children in the 21st century will recognize some familiar images and see agrarian Spain of the 1930s through the crayon drawings of children."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"In the spring of 1989, Chinese students and workers occupied Beijing’s Tiananmen Square and began the largest nonviolent political protest in China’s history. The occupation ended on June 4 after the military “cleared” the Square, resulting in an estimated several hundred deaths. The site provides articles and essays, a virtual tour of the Square and a Media Library with posters, photos, music, the complete transcript of the film, and videos. Videos can be downloaded in QuickTime, Windows Media Player, or RealPlayer. The site is also available in Chinese."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The popular newsmagazine offers an online issue for kids each week. Features include articles around current events, polls, opportunities for kids to talk back, and more. Issues for grades 2-3 and for 4-6 are posted. Also, teachers and parents will find supplemental material available at the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"TIME profiles its top 100 through biographies, audio, and video clips. Groups of 20 are organized around the themes of Leaders & Revolutionaries, Artists & Entertainers, Builders & Titans, Scientists & Healers, and Heroes & Inspirations. TIME will select a Person of the Century in December 1999."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Independence Hall Association takes you on a tour of landmarks of the American Revolution, such as Brandywine, Germantown, Fort Mifflin, Whitemarsh, Philadelphia, and Valley Forge. Callout windows expand upon topics in the primary narrative and define specific terms. The People section provides profiles of over 30 prominent men and women during the Revolutionary Era. A timeline and a bibliography are also provided. Try the rebus game, where pictures replace words, and see if you can figure out what each one means."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The city of Los Angeles is well acquainted with the problems of too many cars. TransitPeople is a volunteer driven Los Angeles non-profit that conducts educational day trips for kids using the public transit system. This site has lessons on early transportation, trains and steamships, cars and planes, and public transit. Early transportation discusses the invention of the wheel, boats, and using horses to get around. Problems with cars, such as air pollution, global warming, and traffic, are addressed. Different types of public transportation include buses, subways, ferries, and trains. Each section has a quiz, there is an answer key at the end, and the entire lesson can be downloaded in a 24 page pdf file."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This project combines the writings of Homer about the Trojan War with the archaeological and geological findings at Troy. The site uses excavation records and archaeological findings from Troy to reconstruct the citadel as it may have appeared at the time of the Trojan War in the 13th Century B.C. The stratigraphy of nine layers of the city are described and artifacts like pottery, iron pieces, and coins represent each layer. QuickTime animations take you on a tour of how ancient Troy was designed."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

Upper elementary and middle school students will enjoy the interactive activities and games about Tudor England. Topics cover rural and urban leisure activities, Henry VIII, religion, foreign trade, and life for the different socioeconomic classes. Sure to be a popular topic is one about jousting, armor, and heraldry. There are many examples of original Tudor documents, with accompanying transcripts. Teacher notes and supporting materials supplement the activities.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site for upper elementary and middle school students teaches about the census, facts about the states, and why it is important to participate in the census. It offers clear examples of why having an accurate census is vital to possible changes in representation in Congress, seeing the need for new schools when a community grows, and how all the information collected is kept private. Click on a state for brief facts and census results from 1990 and 2000. When taking the quiz, you can choose easy or hard questions."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The 1990 Census results are housed at this site, but the 2000 Census data will become available beginning in January 2001.This is a goldmine of information about the citizens of the United States. You will find projections, statistics, reports, and a wealth of other topics. Invaluable for research reports and analysis projects, this site will be useful when comparing data from the 1990 Census and the 2000 Census."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Updated several times a day, this page provides accurate information about current U.S. debt, as well as debt FAQ and links to recent news stories covering America's debt."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The site offers quizzes, forums, student journalist reports, and more for kids interested in learning about child labor laws, gender issues, urban poverty, and HIV around the world. A separate teachers area offers supporting materials and an educator forum. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Did you know that the word caboose is likely from a Dutch word meaning “ship’s galley”? This site from Union Pacific provides historical photos and maps of older and more modern trains, and tells us what the different jobs associated with trains do. There are short biographies of significant people associated with the railroad. The reference section includes a glossary and descriptions of the different kinds of rail cars. Not sure if you should play with a bathtub gondola in your tub or if you should fill it with 100 tons of scrap metal? Next time you watch a train pass, instead of counting how many cars there are, try figuring out what kind they are."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"What is sustainable development? “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” This A to Z list of issues with information and supporting documents will benefit secondary students working on projects related to agriculture, biodiversity, capacity-building, desertification, land management, sustainable tourism, and waste. Within each topic, there will be general background, documents, and actions by the United Nations General Assembly. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United Nations sponsors this one-of-a-kind site filled with timely, rich information. Students will find country-specific information on refugee movements, updated headline news relating to refugees around the world, documents, and legal information. Lesson plans are also available. The site is offered in English, French, German, Japanese, and Korean. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Since 1948, there have been 54 United Nations peacekeeping operations. Did you know there are 15 current missions? Peacekeeping is a technique part way between traditional methods of resolving disputes peacefully (such as mediation and fact-finding) and more forceful action (such as embargos and military intervention). This site from the UN provides a detailed overview about peacekeeping, including a section on land mines, mission operations by date and location, special reports and a news center. Part of the site is also available in French, Chinese, Spanish, and Russian."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This publication in PDF format provides an introductory overview of the American electoral process for people who are not familiar with U.S. election practices and traditions. Topics include: Political Parties in the United States, Presidential Nominations and American Democracy, U.S. Election Procedures, Elections 2004 Timeline, and The State of Campaign Finance. Check the Elections Glossary if you aren’t sure if your spin doctor is reporting on a town meeting or a caucus. This site is produced by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Information Programs. The site is available in Arabic and in Chinese. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum provides many publications in PDF format through their section for teachers. Download specific sections or the entire 133 page book “Teaching about the Holocaust: A Resource Book for Educators.” There is even an online teacher workshop to accompany the book, with online text and short videos (requires RealPlayer). Sample lesson plans are included with the workshop agenda. Some publications are also available in Spanish. Listen to the weekly podcast series, Voices on Genocide Prevention, where you can hear past podcasts and read the transcripts online."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Holocaust Museum offers a site rich in online exhibitions, educational materials, and suggestions for further study on Holocaust issues. Past exhibits have included the Berlin Olympics of 1936, Nuremberg, and Kristallnacht, all of which include archival documents and images. Current features include debates on Kosovo and an exhibition titled ""The Voyage of the St. Louis."" "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan federal institution created and funded by Congress to strengthen the nation's capacity to promote the peaceful resolution of international conflict. Resources for high school students include the National Peace Essay Contest. In previous years, submission deadlines were in January. A Teaching Guide on International Terrorism can be downloaded in pdf format. The Digital Library Project houses peace agreements, truth commission reports, and annotated links to other resources. Highlights are current events related articles, for example, “After Saddam Hussein: Winning a Peace If It Comes to War.”"

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

University of Oregon's History and Geography departments produced this visually rich site. Users with Shockwave capability may enjoy over 50 interactive maps representing American and world history; several dozen images related to world history and culture are also included.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Designed for high school students and teachers, this site features thousands of source documents, photographs, audio recordings, video newsreels, and government reports. Useful components are the timeline, teaching materials, and ideas for mapping the curriculum to state standards. Requires Shockwave, RealAudio, and Adobe. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Vikings sailed from Greenland 1000 years ago to explore North America, eventually landing in Newfoundland. This Smithsonian site takes you on a guided tour of its Viking exhibit. Learn about Viking exploration and view artifacts. Take a Viking voyage from Scandinavia to the New World. Drag your ship along its course and view and listen to lessons in history, archeology, environment, genetics, and the Sagas. There are two versions: standard and enhanced requiring Flash 4, QuickTime 4, and Cult3D. The Learning Center provides a Family and Teacher's Guide, vocabulary, map, Runic alphabets, and an old Norse board game. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"You may use an electronic tablet to take notes in school, but these writing tablets are written in ink on post-card sized sheets of wood, and have been excavated from the Roman fort at Vindolanda in northern England, dating from the late first century AD. A reference guide provides information about aspects of Roman life and terminology such as military ranks, currency, weights and measures. There is a searchable online edition of the tablets, images and translations of tablet fragments, and commentaries."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Virtual Jamestown offers historical documents including census data, runaway slave advertisements, maps, laws, and more. The site also offers modern essays, timelines, QTVR panoramas of the current fort and site, and a bibliography."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"What was life like for a working class family during the Victorian Era? For the women, days of washing, ironing, cleaning, cooking, emptying chamber pots, baking, going to market, and preparing for bath night. For men and older children, a five and a half day work week of 12 hours a day. View the Themes Gallery for images and descriptions of agriculture, personal health, clothing, and many other topics. The eToys section is full of fun activities with guessing what objects were used for, building with blocks, viewing slides with a magic lantern, and a Kariosithon, where you arrange six everyday objects in order of invention."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"“Voices of Civil Rights” covers the period from the 14th amendment in 1868 abolishing slavery to the 2003 Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action. The site highlights many civil rights movements in addition to the Civil Rights Movement in the early 1960s: gay and lesbian, equal rights for women, American Indian Movement, and the Gray Panthers support for the elderly and disabled. There is a section on ongoing civil rights issues and how activists today are seeking equality in education, eliminating hate crimes, and promoting racial tolerance. Other features include Jackie Robinson’s impact on civil rights, a glossary, a photo gallery, and a quiz. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

The Missouri State Library hosts a site about the war by theme: 1939-1941, Pearl Harbor, Europe and D-Day, Home Front, Pacific Theater, and Post War. News bulletins, music, speeches, and other radio shows puts you in the living room at a time when your grandparents were your age, listening to the war unfold on the radio.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The National Park Service provides an itinerary for historic places of the civil rights movement. Included in the 49 places in 20 states is the Woolworth Building in Greensboro, North Carolina, where four African American college students took seats in the “whites-only” lunch counter. After being ignored and taunted, the students went back the next few days with more supporters each day. Within a year, over 100 cities integrated restaurants and lunch counters. You can tour the map of the states by clicking on dots, and be sure to go to Alabama where there are numerous places along the March from Selma to Montgomery. Main sections of the site include The Need for Change, The Players, The Strategy, The Cost, and The Prize."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The information at the Immigration in Indiana site focuses on one state, but lessons and materials are not confined to only Indiana. The lesson plans are designed for grades 6-12, and introduce basic concepts about immigration and the resulting cultural diversity. Other features include demographic information for Indiana’s population for the past century, a glossary, and digital archives of photos and documents. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This site from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian uses past and contemporary art and artifacts to discuss what has happened to the Native American culture over the past hundred years. Topics presented are forced assimilation, relocation, boarding school education, and the loss of language and traditions. Each of the four sections: Changing Reservation Realities, School Bells & Haircuts, Tolerating Tourists, Beyond Smoke & Mirrors, presents changes in Native American lifestyle. Each section has a gallery to explore with commentary found in each introduction. A rollover, or ""mouseover,"" of the images will pop up a larger image to view. Flash is required but printer friendly pages are also provided."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

This site is the companion to a radio documentary broadcast in 1997 on the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. The series goes behind the scenes in five Southern cities to reveal how a mass movement is made. The Program section provides summaries and complete transcripts of the interviews. With RealAudio you can hear excerpts of the interviews. The Focus section is a listener’s guide for students and teachers with discussion questions and vocabulary to accompany each episode.

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Lakota recorded important events on a calendar called a winter count. Each year was associated with a pictograph and was later known by that year, such as “The Year the Stars Fell” (1833 from the Leonid meteor shower). You may have a similar method, like “the year I broke my leg” or “the year of the Spanish Flu” and all that was associated with that time. Several winter counts portray the winter of 1813-1814 with people coughing, the year many died of whooping cough. You can see close-ups of many winter counts and what the diagrams probably portray. A narrated feature tells about the Lakota, westward migration and eventually how their land was broken into small disconnected reservations. Flash is required but you can also view it in an html version. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This Christian Science Monitor site is about everyday women making a difference in the world. Females in the arts, history, literature, politics, religion, and sports are portrayed through interviews, articles, and images. Most are women and girls we have never heard of before but are glad we met through this site. Articles on women's rights are also featured."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Did you ever wonder what it would be like to homestead in a sod house? You can read the letters one homesteading woman wrote in the 1870s. Many primary sources are provided including letters, photographs, and historical documents. Other virtual exhibits about women who shaped the American West are about women artists and women’s suffrage. Activities and other resources accompany the site. Reading lists for primary, intermediate and middle school grades are also included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"On December 29, 1890, almost 300 Lakota men, women, and children were massacred by the 7th Cavalry at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. During 1890, when sensational journalism ignited unreasonable fears among white settlers that the Lakota were staging an uprising, President Benjamin Harrison ordered the military to take control of the Lakota reservations. Sitting Bull was killed in mid December while Big Foot was accompanying his band to Pine Ridge. The cavalry escorted Big Foot’s band to Wounded Knee, and during the disarmament, a shot was fired, and the massacre began. Eight short exhibits of the museum are online. An audio clip of the last survivor of the massacre, Dewey Beard, is included in the section about Lakota Today. Flash is required to view the site. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"This web site by the Smithsonian Institution presents the stunning cloth made by the Asante of Ghana and the Ewe of Ghana and Togo. Kente is the best known of all African textiles, and is historically the cloth of kings. This site describes how it is made, when it is worn, and how to wear it. There is a section for you to design your own kente, which requires ShockWave. You can click on highlighted African words to hear them pronounced."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History provides this online game for kids. Students examine material artifacts from a family living in Delaware in the eighteenth century, then explore what scientists and historians might conclude about late-twentieth-century life through our material possessions. Classroom context is provided as well. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"Where do you belong? The Progressive Generation, the War Generation, the Baby Boomers, Generation X, or the Next Generation? Henry Ford Museum's exhibit highlights five generations of the 20th century and looks at everyday technologies that shaped each of those generations. Each generation is brought to live with a vignette allowing you to ""meet"" a representative of that generation. You can also search the timeline of decades to find out what was happening during that year in history. Classroom activities are included."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"The Library of Congress provides a site using their map collections from 1500 to modern times. This activity introduces historical maps from the American Memory collections. There is a graphic organizer, a set of guiding questions for each type of map, and a set of activities to learn how to read a map’s orientation, legend, scale, and how historical maps illustrate change over time. Major topics include local geography, exploration and discovery, migration, travel, military, and unusual maps. "

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies

"An online exhibition from Cornell explores the history of slavery, resistance, and abolition from the 1700s through 1865. Many primary source documents include broadsides for slave sales, engravings, and slave narratives. Abolitionists, black and white, are featured in short biographies. The Underground Railroad is one of many methods described that were used to end slavery as well as the range of strategies from moral persuasion in lecture halls to John Brown’s insurrection."

Resource Type: Recommended Non-PBS Link

Subject: Social Studies