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learning.now: at the crossroads of Internet culture & education with host Andy Carvin

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January232009

What Does School Reform Look Like?

This weekend, I’ll be moderating a discussion at the second annual EduCon conference in which we tackle the question, “What does school reform look like?” It’s such a big topic that no discussion panel could ever capture the full scope of it. So in the spirit of the conversational nature of the EduCon conference, let’s start talking about it now.

This will be my first time at the EduCon conference, though it wil be my second attempt. Last year I was all set to make the drive to Philadelphia from DC, but a wicked sinus infection had other plans for me. That’s probably why conference organizer Chris Lehmann slyly decided to invite me to moderate a panel, as I would then have to be on my deathbed in order to pull out of it in that circumstance. (Well played, Chris - well played.) And don’t worry, I’m feeling quite well, despite my dance with hypothermia on the National Mall at the inauguration earlier this week.

I’m really looking forward to EduCon, largely because it’s going to be chock full of really smart people who get both pedagogy and technology. Edtech luminaries like Will Richardson, Cheryl Nussbaum-Beach, Gary Stager and Dave Warlick will all be presenting there. And because it’s a relatively small conference (especially in comparison to monster events like NECC), it’ll be a great chance to have a lot of face-time and group interaction with everyone there.

It also helps that EduCon, as a conference, really gets it. The event is organized around a number of basic principles: schools should be inquiry-driven and focus on creating 21st century citizens. Technology must serve pedagogy, not the other way around, and enable students to research, create, communicate and collaborate. Learning can - and must - be networked.

On Sunday, I’ll be getting up at the crack of dawn to make the drive to Philly for my panel on school reform. I fully expect to get some thoughtful, provocative answers from my panelists, who include Lehmann, Stager, Mike Wang of Teach for America and former Maine edtech director Bette Manchester, among others. But like I said, even if we were to address the entire conference on what school reform looks like, we’d just be scratching the service on the topic.

So let’s start chatting now. What does school reform look like to you? Does it incorporate principles like inquiry-based learning and 21st century citizenship, as suggested by the conference themes? How central a role does technology play in reform, and how do we avoid it from being a distraction to our ultimate goals? What barriers need to be broken down or even demolished outright? And how realistic is it that we’ll reach any of these goals?

If you want, feel free to post your thoughts in the discussion thread below. But you can also post your thoughts elsewhere - on Twitter, on YouTube, on your own blog, etc, as long as you use the tag educon. Conference organizers will be tracking that keyword on a variety of sites, so we’ll all be able to follow each other’s conversations in a distributed fashion. I’ll then report back later on some of the discussions that take place.

So… What does school reform look like? -andy

Filed under : Events, Policy

Responses

One angle that I hope really picks up in school reform is the integration of a holistic fitness programs.

The folks at PE4life are doing some amazing stuff and seeing results. Here’s a video.

Their work was mentioned in Spark by Harvard’s John Ratey, which looks at exercise and its effects on the brain.

Andy,
I’m at EduCon right now in a class at SLA. Students and teachers learning together. Looking forward to the learning going on this weekend. I stopped Chris Lehmann to ask a question a few hours ago about the themes students explore each year, he is so passionate about learning. Inspiring! Students say the fact that it’s a 1:1 laptop program isn’t the main reason they came. It’s about the learning. Very cool

The traditional brick and mortar school setting simply does not fit the needs of all students. I would like to see more discussion of how on-line courses could play a role in the education of middle and high school students. I’ve been teaching for nine years and there always seems to be two or three students who simply cannot maintain themselves behaviorally/socially in a classroom setting. On-line courses would put the onus on them and allow the rest of the class to function more smoothly.

What does school reform look like to you?
Looks like project-based collaborative learning, supporting inquiry. Ungraded schools supplemented with hybrid online courses. As with the Coalition of Essential Schools model a capstone like activity that demonstrates deep understandings and the ability to apply knowledge in new contexts. One very good model to consdider: Expeditionary Learning Schools.

Does it incorporate principles like inquiry-based learning and 21st century citizenship, as suggested by the conference themes?
Yes, especially the Seven Survival Skills that Tony Wagner delineates in “The Global Achievement Gap.” Definitely worth reading. Here are the seven:

1. Critical thinking and problem-solving
2. Collaboration across networks and leadership by influence
3. Adaptability and agility
4. Initiative and entrepreneurialship
5. Effective oral and written communication skills
6. Accessing and analyzing information
7. Curiosity and imagination

How central a role does technology play in reform, and how do we avoid it from being a distraction to our ultimate goals?
Technology should play a central role given that it makes information readily available, allows collaboration in ways otherwise not possible, such as global projects. It be used only when it makes sense.

What barriers need to be broken down or even demolished outright?
We will have to give up on the idea that its possible to measure student achievement with a once-a-year standardized test. This should be replace with ongoing formative assessments and other so called “authentic” forms of assessment depending on the nature of the learning and its context.

And how realistic is it that we’ll reach any of these goals?
Unfortunately, slim. Given the fact that its far easier for the public to understand a number that they can then compare to another number (standardized tests) it will be a hard sell to convince them that there is a better way to assess and learn.

The other major obstacle is the fact that inquiry-based models such as project-based learning and its cousins, require skills that most teachers haven’t learned as part of their teacher preparation. Lots of professional development will be required and given that it is costly, it seems unlikely. Then, there is the issue of time. For teachers to become effective with the inquiry-based model they need time to work with peers, evaluate lessons, reflect on and refine their teaching.

Then there are the cultural barriers. Parents expect their children to be taught in the same manner that they were taught. This combined with the current political climate given NCLB work against change.

I’ve worked in high schools in two different states and I’d say that a top priority for school reform would be to model and teach civility. Many of our students in both high and low economical situations; in multi-cultural and homogenous schools; in big schools and small need to learn to “be nice.” It is a quality that will actually help them succeed in the business world (see research done by the Dalai Lama in his book Destructive Emotions)
Alice O’Grady

School reform: letting the students be in charge of their own thinking. I work in third grade where the students seem to have to be sponges, so much material for them to absorb that there is little if any time for them to think for themselves or about the material presented to them. Outside the classroom they are surrounded by multi media which stimulates their senses, this is what school reform should tap into: multi media. My third graders’ eyes light up when something is presented to them in a different way and often it is when they are allowed to get up and move around, I believe we should come away from the sitting in a chair for hours on end and let them explore physically what is around them, chaos may ensue but so many things can be born out of chaos! My question is how long can we as adults sit for so long and concentrate completely for say two hours? I know I would be squirming. School reform needs to allow for wiggle room.

Andy,

Thanks so much for coming up and moderating… it was a ton of fun!

— Chris

I would like to see reforms that include all students, of all incomes and backgrounds. Someone mentioned online classes, but what about those students who don’t have access to the internet at home? Someone else mentioned letting students be in charge of their own thinking. What about students whose home culture expect more formal learning environment? Will they feel marginalized?

School reform must take everyone into consideration.

There is a cool video on youtube about how we are training our students they way we always have, using the same tired model that prepared our grandparents’ generation for factory work. The crazy thing is that we should be training our students for jobs that haven’t even been created yet! I like the ideas about giving students more choice and flexibility, but it is hard to throw the traditional classroom model out the window. I just don’t want to see more student centered learning mean a loss of respect for authority.

I think that School Reform shouldn’t look like anything new. Good teaching has always been good teaching - projects that are engaging, meaningful, authentic, with thoughtful assessment woven throughout. The only caveat for the present is the inclusion of digital technology - but the pedagogy is the same. Whenever students are asked to use a tool, it should be in the service of thinking or communicating differently. Here’s my humbled attempts:
http://www.galileo.org/initiatives/vmuseum-v1/

http://thinkinginmind.blogspot.com

School reform should look like students are independently learning. The teacher should be guiding the students, not lecturing. Don’t most students learn more without being lectured. Students should be given the opportunity to explore, make mistakes and think for themselves.I believe most important, is students are allowed to be themselves and not a standarized test.

School reform should look like students are independently learning. The teacher should be guiding the students, not lecturing. Don’t most students learn more without being lectured. Students should be given the opportunity to explore, make mistakes and think for themselves.I believe most important, is students are allowed to be themselves and not a standarized test.

School reform must involve the latest research and technology as well as allowing students to become independent thinkers and problem solvers. The latest in neuroscience research shows that the human brain is “plastic”. Students coined as having developmental disabilities can still learn. Knowing this, more should be developed in regards to better intervention methods that will ensure every child’s success.

In regards to technology, even the less priveledged communities should have the resources at schools that are going to incorporate technology into the classroom in some way or another. There are endless possibilities when incorporating technology into education. Technology is the future and our students must not be left behind regardless of their situations at home. This is how I see educational reform.

School reform may need to look different depending on the needs of the students being served.

I don’t think there is a one size fits all model. US schools need reform that require technology, but many urban schools are not successfully dealing with the basic skills gaps their students are coming to school with. I think technology can help deal with basic skills and the higher order 21st century skills. I recently tried to talk about this issue and the balance teachers need to strike when kids come in really missing basics.

http://edupress.wordpress.com/2008/11/26/21st-century-skills-and-struggling-students/

School reform may need to look different depending on the needs of the students being served.

I don’t think there is a one size fits all model. US schools need reform that require technology, but many urban schools are not successfully dealing with the basic skills gaps their students are coming to school with. I think technology can help deal with basic skills and the higher order 21st century skills. I recently tried to talk about this issue and the balance teachers need to strike when kids come in really missing basics.

http://edupress.wordpress.com/2008/11/26/21st-century-skills-and-struggling-students/

Good Morning Andy:

Thank you for the opportunity to submit my thoughts on TRUE school reform.

First:
Teachers must LOVE children. No no..not love to teach. Rather LOVE children. Why? Because the children are the customer. And as in any business, you must love your customer.

Learning and education must emanate from the CHILD’S perspective. Just as in building a user friendly web site - it emanates fromt the USER’S perspective - not the builder’s.

Second:
Teachers must possess a very broad world view. This is the only way our children/young people (students)are going to be prepared to compete on the world’s stage. Many teachers possess a parochial position that is not aligned with the goals of the workforce nor is it integrated with any true measure of success outside of its four walls.

Third:
Teachers must SERVE the whole person that is the student. I have, with regret, witnessed the devastation that occurs in a child’s spirit when no room is given for them to be children. They are constantly reprimanded, criticized and reminded of their falters. What happened to PRAISE GOES A LONG WAY. As a student athlete, (many…many years ago), I was blessed to have coaches that COACHED me to great performance.

Fourth:
New and innovative ways of teaching. The day of the “5 hours of sitting” model is all but gone. This is a new breed of child. Technology via X Box - Play Station - DS and Game Boy and more, heightens their senses and learning for them takes place at the speed of light! Why are we forcing them to sit…and sit…with no WILLINGNESS to innovate.

And Finally: (And the last is first)
Dr. Christopher Zook, Director with Bain and Company suggests: “…if you want to find out what the customer wants/needs…ASK THE CUSTOMER.”

Are we asking the customer, our children, how to best reform education. They sit in the class and, in some instances, suffer through the rigidity of teachers that, in many instances, should not be teaching. So let’s ask them.

Again, thank you for the opportunity. I look forward to continuing this PIVOTAL dialogue.

Respectfully submitted,
Grace A. Odums

School reform should look like whatever makes the school progress (new technology, updated resources, and addressing situations that allows the growth of education)

Talking about online school reform.. i really think this is the most amazing online schooling venture i’ve seen….http://uscmastersineducation.com/rsvp.php
CHECK IT OUT!

How about free courses available on every computer - like Hulu does TV. This would free up school budgets, utilize existing distance learning courses & create some equality for poorer districts. There is so much that could be done at every level - good GED classes on every computer! Actual classes, coursework, testing & degrees would be at schools where possible - but, rural or homebound students would have other options to complete courses. We could improve access & content everywhere. Education would truly be available to all.

How about free courses available on every computer - like Hulu does TV. This would free up school budgets, utilize existing distance learning courses & create some equality for poorer districts. There is so much that could be done at every level - good GED classes on every computer! Actual classes, coursework, testing & degrees would be at schools where possible - but, rural or homebound students would have other options to complete courses. We could improve access & content everywhere. Education would truly be available to all.

Schools will continue on the path of school reform because educators are committed to doing what is best for the child. Yet, schools alone are blamed for low-achieving children who come from low socio-economic groups while ignoring the overwhelming evidence of the impact of family and community environments on children’s achievement. There is evidence that raising disadvantaged children to a high level of achievement through schools alone — is nearly impossible. Yes, teachers must be highly committed to their students, innovative uses of technology in the classroom will open many avenues for learning, and we must continue to use the investigative approach in elementary schools. But school reform must include an early focus on the families that need the most intensive support. Susan Neuman’s book, “Changing the Odds for Children at Risk,” describes nonschool interventions which start at birth. School Reform needs to include all stages of child development and all factors that contribute to a child’s achievement level.

It is so true when you stated “Technology must serve pedagogy, not the other way around, and enable students to research, create, communicate and collaborate. Learning can - and must - be networked.” I really think people are terrified of the way technology will be a part of education now and in the future, but it really just leaves us with so many opportunities. A video I think everyone will really enjoy is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDfew0YcDTo
SO interesting when you consider all the technological opportunities in education for everyone today.
Azahar (EducationDynamics)

I think part of school reform should be a change in the grading system that begins with higher expectations. Many years ago, C students were the norm. There weren’t that many A students. Today it is almost the reverse. You have very few students making C’s; most of them are making A’s and B’s. What is happening to cause this inflation in grades? Have students gotten smarter over the years? If not, why are educators expecting less?

Teachers are professionals. Ask any teacher after the first month of school, and they can tell you where a child is in their learning, and what they need to grow. If this growth does not occur, it is not because the teacher has not tried everything they can, given the tremendous amount of work and limited time they have. A myriad of factors could cause a student to fail. Unfortunately, the one that gets the credit is the teacher. What did you not do that you should have to help this child pass? NCLB has exacerbated this problem. Our education system needs someone to blame for why everyone is not learning instead of taking a look at the real problems of why our system is not meeting everyone’s needs. A result of this is that many teachers have had to lower their expectations so that everyone can pass.

Parents are not much help. If you don’t give out mostly A’s on reports cards, you can expect to get some phone calls the day the report cards are sent home. Parents, and hence their children, expect those A’s. When did average get such a bad rap? Some parents are more concerned about that “A” than they are that their child is truly being challenged, and therefore learning.

Across the board, expectations are lower allowing everyone to succeed. In theory, this should not keep higher ability students from being challenged, via differentiation, but the end result has been something quite different. Many of those high achieving students have lowered their expectations for themselves. They are content to sit in a class that does not push them to try hard. The “A” is what matters.

These inflated grades do a great job of covering up those students that would otherwise be failing. We have students arriving at high school who cannot do basic math, reading, and writing. Along comes standardized tests to solve this problem, tests which are not only destroying our children’s love of learning, but for some teachers, destroying a love of teaching. These tests prevent many teachers from doing project based, authentic learning activities.

Not any one thing would solve the ills of education. How do we get our students to achieve more? One possibility is for administrators, teachers, parents, and students to have higher expectations. Administrators need to set up a school climate where teachers are allowed the freedom to hold students accountable for higher levels of achievement. It won’t be easy. Parents and students accustomed to earning high grades for very little effort will be lining up at the principal’s door. More students will fail. But instead of merely sweeping these children under the rug with a multiple choice test, we will have to come up with real alternatives to address their learning needs. No child should be left behind, but the educational system has merely hidden the problem with inflated grades, not solved it.

School reform, that is, public school reform, has to be tackled from both a systemic and social perspective. To that end, let me offer a view from a different angle — from the community college.

As a community college educator, I have witnessed the decline in college readiness with respect to reading, writing, critical thinking, motivation, etc. Certainly these issues arise in part from the k-12 system and the disasterous move to educate primarily for vocation and testing, rather than educating the entirety of the being. Commodifying education to the point when results are demonstrated merely through quantifiable means has created a lop-sided idea of the purpose of school — it is not merely a means to a career end — it is a means to self discovery on so many other levels, as well as a means to creating an informed, critically aware society.

To that end, we have failed the students — as their future is impacted. Exiting the k-12 system, so many people are under-prepared for adult life with respect to skills and to awareness. The next point of failure is to shift the remedy for a poor education to the community colleges.

All students should be educated to a certain standard prior to exiting high school, as not all students wish to attend college or are able to attend college. For the last few years, the focus in community college has been how to address basic skills. Certainly, basic skills must be tackled, but should it rest on the community college instructors to assist in college readiness? To put the onus on community college instructors to prepare students for the 4 year college creates a sense that community college is a middle school, grades 13 and 14, in a transition to real college.

However, community college instructors are college instructors. Educators who attended graduate school in their given discipline, as their peers in the universities, in order to teach at the college level. The difference is merely where the instructor works.

Placing the burdern of college readiness on community college educators creates a difficulty: community college educators are not properly equipped to attend to writing/reading for all students — particularly when the students are in history classes, etc. To do this creates a twist in teaching that the given educator must address that would never be placed on the university instructor — how to teach writing, critical thinking not with respect to the given discipline, but in general. The under-prepared student in the university would simply fail the class. However, in the community college, the educators are supposed to address the lacking basic skills of the students which arose via their k-12 education, not their intellectual ability. The community college instructor is charged with continuing the basic, fundamental education, and not to their college development — where college is a choice. The students who leave k-12 and choose not to attend college are thereby set into further marginalization, since their skills are inadequate in even moreso than their peers who attend college from the same high school. If all students who graduate have less than adequate skills, and those who attend community college are given the opportunity to get to college readiness prior to transfer, what is that saying about those who do not attend?

The other marginalized group — community college instructors. Here are educators who chose to further their education in order to explore their given discipline by writing, teaching, etc. who are not treated as college educators, but as almost college educators — some place between high school and the university. Those who teach at the k-12 level have the ability to attend to the needs of the learners, as they are trained to do so during their college experience. K-12 instructors have, by choice, acquired the skills, techniques, etc. to teach young people the necessary, fundamental things required for life — reading, writing, math, etc. These instructors are gifted in addressing learning from so many angles. A college instructor typically lacks that gift, as the training for classroom instruction is informal, with an expectation that a given skill set of students is already in place. The k-12 teacher is the necessary link for college, as well for life without college. I certainly could not do the job of teaching all subjects, to all sorts of learners, and have to address the students’ family needs, etc. That is a skill that is lacking in most college instructors.

A community college class is a college class. If the same course is taken at the university it holds the same credit value. Community college is supposed to be a cheaper place to take the first 2 years of classes. It is not supposed to be the place to play catch-up. It is not fair to have students pay for 1 to 2 extra years of college in order to be ready for college in the first place. Similarly, it is not appropriate to put their basic education in the hands of people who are not properly skilled to do so.

Please don’t misread this. K-12 teachers have a job that is nearly impossible to perform given the current state of education. They are the gifted front line of education through which all students must pass, both those who choose not to attend college and those that do. If we do not pay attention to the k-12 system all students are placed in jeopardy. If community college is put as the place to continue to address the failure of public schools, it is completely unfair to those who do not attend college. It is similarly unfair to those who attend community college, as their college life is extended by a year or two, which is costly and time consuming. It is further unfair to put community college educators in a position for which they are not capable of doing adequately, nor one which they set out to do.

As long as the community college is seen as the place to acquire college readiness (an odd circular logic), the more marginalized all those involved will be — k-12 teachers, all learners, community college instructors.

The economic crisis is not only after the consent of the parties concerned who are the people who called themselves a top layer which is a policy with a long time ago and we are the world’s population engaged in the destruction of the economic downturn

The economic crisis is not only after the consent of the parties concerned who are the people who called themselves a top layer which is a policy with a long time ago and we are the world’s population engaged in the destruction of the economic downturn

There are many valid opinions here but let’s put things in some perspective. Technology reform is an integral piece in the evolution of education. But we, as educators are never going to agree on the “how to” of reform because their are so many fantastic ideas out there. Heck, many of them may work, who knows.

How do we measure success in a school? Is a suburban school that graduates 98% of its students in a sanitized environment better than an inner city school that graduates 50-60%. Is a student who has suspect work habits that gets accepted in to any Ivy league school considered more successful than a student who works hard everyday but barely ekes out a “C.” The bottom line is what works in one school may not work in another.

Americans, generally, have little vision of the future. Parents, politicians, and policy wonks are fine with reform as long as they can see positive results in a relatively short period of time, i.e., standardized test scores. These are the measuring stick of how education is progressing far too often for these groups of people.

Humans don’t work that way. They can’t be quantified or qualified with a test score. They take time to mature and develop. The true impact education has on an individual can’t really be qualified until much later in that person’s life. Think about the one teacher that had a major influence on your life. You may have not realized it until many years later.

Innovation and reform have been talked about for as long as I can remember, yet, the public schools of today don’t look all that much different than it was 30 years ago. Most people outside the walls of education are looking for a quick fix. It doesn’t exist. There’s no magical formula. It takes hard work, commitment, high standards and time.

I believe we have to develop a universal set of educational principles that most of us can agree on and use those principles as a framework from which to build our “houses” of reform. No panacea, no quick fix, … just pressure and time.

It will require a leap of faith on the part of the general public that we have the best interest in mind of our students and that we can and will succeed if society lets us do what we do best.

The following is just a short list of what I would like those principles to look like. Nothing stamped in granite here and certainly room for critique but you gotta start somewhere:

ALL students can learn.
All education is local.
Variation leads to innovation.
Teachers must achieve “master” status.
Schools, run by teachers, must have complete control over all educational matters.
Student teacher ratio maximum(Number subject for debate)
Limit law suits on school districts and teachers.

This is by no means an exhaustive list but I think it’s an adequate start.

I may be too limited to move on, but I can not see beyond the basics. To have a successful learning experience for all involved parties, we need to start with “a sound student”. Most children are born with a natural curiosity. What happens between birth and 3-5 years is a monumental undertaking of possibilities or a deafening stifling of the glories and wonders of the human spirit.
Instead of so much being invested in corrections and interventions after this time span, much more should be done in parenting education and early development efforts. I know … how do we intervene in the lives of families of that are so grandly dysfunctional? Schools, our democracy, have always taken on areas that are better handled by a better educated population,but what options do we have?. We are in denial, if we do not recognize that most of us are just average and are naturally suceptible to “living what we learn”. “We” have a vested interest in saving more of our young people from repeating the cycle of negative behaviors and attitudes. Most of us will do just fine with a good start. When we know better, we do better.
Monitor, intervene, care about how we all begin, and more of us will have a a far better “journey” through this gift of life.

One thing that I have discovered is that in order to move ahead we have to consider where kids are at in “the present” and tailor our teaching accordingly. I truly believe that we are on the cusp of an upheaval, recognizing that the traditional methods are not working very well, not reaching everyone or not taking advantage of opportunities.

If we as educators remain blind to our environment, even if we think that it needs to be different, then we will never effect change. If kids text or Twitter ask them if they care who understands what they wrote? If kid act independently or aggressively ask them if they care who they offend? If kids challenge themselves and are assertive ask them if they hurt anyone in the process?

School reform will not be defined by any one measure but must encompass a variety of approaches. What will be different now is that I think people might be more willing to accept fundamental changes. Or at least take a risk to try something different.

Theresa,

I agree with you that we need to get kids to think about what is happening to them and vocalize what they feel about it. They also need to be taught how others react to what they do. It seems to me that sometimes, once people (all people not just kids) get plugged into something it is very difficult to then communicate with them. I believe that reform should start with communication and what better starting point than the tools of communication avaialble such as cell phones, iphones, internet and so on? Teachers and those in administration need to move with the times as the young people we teach move, this should lead to better understanding of each other so we can work together instead of against each other.

While the Educon conference has passed, I found your original question “what does school reform looks like?” intriguing and relevant. It is talked about, budgeted, governed, and implemented all the time but there are so many different programs going on that it is difficult to follow even for a high school teacher like me. For me I would like to see more emphasis on brain based learning principals, kinesthetic learning, technology, the arts, and humanity projects.

Thank you Andy great article and to the point.

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http://ecrazysales.com

I was searching blogs to respond to, in requirement of a TE Technology course, and came upon your blog thinking, “what a find”, and “how appropriate”, it was for this assignment. First of all, a weblog that explores how new technology and internet culture affect how educators teach and children learn would be of great interest to my professor and the students in this class. But back to your blog, it was quite informative to learn about the EduCon conference that you moderated a discussion at. I am just learning about inquiry based learning and 21st century citizenship in education and you have brought a better light to this subject matter. I hope that the conference went well and look forward to following topics on learning.now.

The article provided an interesting perspective. School reform will undoubtedly continue to utilise new technologies as time progresses. Education strategies that take into account a clear and concise approach, promote easy access, and user-friendliness will support the school learning experience. Alvira Khan, Florida Atlantic University, FAU Boca Raton Alumna.

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