November 08, 2019

This week on To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe, our panelists discuss fetal homicide laws, cohabitation and marriage and pioneering Veteran, Linda Bray.

On the panel this week joining host Bonnie Erbe is: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Rina Shah, Erin Matson, and Ann Stone.

Click read more to see what they had to say!

[Post Jump Content]

Fetal Homicide Laws

A California woman is charged with murder after delivering a stillborn

  • Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton: “I seriously doubt [that fetal homicide laws are Constitutional], but their emergence today speaks to frustration with the durability with Roe v. Wade”

  • Rina Shah: “Until it happens to you, until you’re in this scenario where you need to terminate an unwanted pregnancy, you’re not really thinking about what your state's laws are entirely.” 

  • Erin Matson: “I believe that Roe v. Wade is seriously threatened and endangered in the united states... the United States is rapidly becoming more and more like El Salvador, where there is a total abortion ban, where we have more than a dozen women sitting in prison right now over miscarriages.”

  • Ann Stone: “Roe is really not in danger, but they are trying to find clever ways to chip away.”  “every time there’s been a statewide initiative on the issue of choice, the pro choice side always wins even in the conservative states.

  • Bonnie Erbe: “People like Antonin Scalia used to, supposedly, think, ‘why start a revolution and overturn it? Because it’s already meaningless.’ Well, if you can have fetal homicide laws in 38 states of what good is Roe v. Wade?”

Cohabitation

Living together is more common and more accepted than ever, a new study finds

  • Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton: “People do not understand that there is much to marriage itself. I think that what may be prompting some of this is that these young people have seen divorce. And then they are being influenced by divorce itself and how ugly it can be and think that maybe not being married and just being together is a better way”

  • Rina Shah: “I do think marriage is on the way out. That actually saddens me because the Conservative part of me is over and over. I’ve just seen that when you live together, there’s no need to make it official from either side.”

  • Erin Matson: “I don’t think marriage is on the way out. And I think what’s actually really interesting about this new study on cohabitation is actually a different problem. I think it’s wonderful if you are in love and want to move in with someone, go for it, that’s great. The question is, there's people who are not getting married because of finances.”

  • Ann Stone: “Well, in the old days, marriage was an economic arrangement. I’m talking about way back. We sort of invented the da of marriage for love. And yeah, the pendulum has swung a little bit against marriage, I think you’re going to see it swing back. Although, ironically, in my family, my sister and I are the two that cohabited. I’ve been engaged for 16 years and people say, ‘wouldn’t you get married?’”

  • Bonnie Erbe: “But 20 years ago, we went to California because they were one of the first states to have a law against, you know, that they had to pay paternity whether they were married or not”

Pioneering Female Vet

Linda Bray was the first American woman to lead troops into battle

  • Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton: “Everybody, I think, would rejoice in the fact that you got to see these [pioneering women in the military] in order to understand that we’ve got to do more to integrate them into every part of our society”

  • Rina Shah: “The concept of a woman in our armed forces is still a very new thing. It's certainly, I don't think, has made its way down to society at a deeper level where people just say, ‘look, women are just as capable.’”

  • Erin Matson: “I find it astonishing that it took nearly 25 years after we had a woman successfully lead a mission in combat until women were actually allowed by the military to fight in combat”

  • Ann Stone: “Having women [in the military], they're finding out that we're still the most elite and effective fighting force in the world, even if we have women in the military, [that] has gone a long way.”

  • Bonnie Erbe: “Combat itself has changed a lot. I mean, a lot of combat is, you know, a computer somewhere that is telling the drone where to drop its bomb.”


Be sure to tune in this week for more discussion! Click here to check your local listings.