Money and Politics
Trade Secrets

Corporations, labor unions and other interest groups can organize political action committees (PACs) to raise money to support or oppose candidates. Between 1999 and 2000, the chemical industry gave more than $2.25 million to federal candidates and parties through 42 political action committees.

The first PAC was born in 1944, when the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) formed a committee to re-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt. As with all PACs, this one originated as a means of circumventing campaign contribution legislation. The CIO PAC represented union interests, but was barred by the Smith Connally Act of 1943 from accepting union treasury funds. Instead, it accepted individual funds from union members.

Today, there are thousands of PACs, most of them representing single corporations, unions or trade associations in every major industry. As with the original CIO committee, funding for these PACs cannot come from corporate, union or association treasuries. PAC funding comes primarily from individuals - who may give up to $5,000 each year to any one PAC - and from other PACs.

In any given year, a PAC may contribute as follows at the federal level: up to $15,000 to any national party committee; up to $5,000 to any federal candidate; and up to $5,000 to any other PAC. In addition, PACs may spend unlimited amounts on advertising and other media that support or oppose issues or candidates relevant to their mission.

Chemical & Related Manufacturing, Top 10 PAC Contributions to Federal Candidates, 1999-2000

PAC Name

Full Name and Affiliation

Affiliated Organization Select Products or Activities

Total Contribution

 

BASF Corp

 

BASF CORPORATION EMPLOYEES POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE

 

Chemicals, plastics, colorants and pigments, automotive and industrial coatings, crop-protection agents, oils and gas

 

$214,250

 

FMC Corp

 

FMC CORPORATION GOOD GOVERNMENT PROGRAM

 

Pest control, lithium-based batteries, refrigeration systems, industrial chemicals, food technology, biopolymers, agricultural products

 

$212,100

 

Dow Chemical/HQ Unit

 

POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE OF EMPLOYEES OF THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY (PACE)

 

Adhesives and sealants, chemical processing, cleaning agents, cosmetics, paintings, plastics, rubber

 

$179,325

 

Procter & Gamble

 

PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY GOOD GOVERNMENT COMMITTEE, THE (AKA P&G PAC)

 

Baby care, beauty care, feminine care, health care, fabric and home care, food and beverages, tissues and towels

 

$138,610

 

Dupont Co

 

DUPONT GOOD GOVERNMENT FUND

 

Herbicides, insecticide, fungicide, carpets, resins, fabrics, film, insulation, flouro-chemicals, cleaning agents

 

$120,000

 

American Chemistry Council

 

AMERICAN CHEMISTRY COUNCIL POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE-ALSO DOES BUSINESS AS CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION (CMA) PAC

 

American Chemistry Council (ACC), which changed its name from Chemical Manufacturers Association in 2000, is the principal association for the chemical industry

 

$110,150

 

GAF Corp

 

GAF CORPORATION AND INTERNATIONAL SPECIALTY PRODUCTS INC

 

Coatings, adhesives, asphalt and other roofing products

 

$94,500

 

Praxair Inc.

 

PRAXAIR INC POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE

 

Industrial gases, surfaces, coatings and polishing products

 

$83,000

 

Solutia

 

SOLUTIA INC CITIZENSHIP FUND A/K/A SOLUTIA CITIZENSHIP FUND

 

Epoxy resins and hardeners, fibers, solvents, carpets, film

 

$63,668

 

Rohm & Haas Co

 

ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT

 

Herbicides, insecticides, anti-microbial protection, plastic adhesives, sealants, varnishes, polyurethane

 

$60,500


For full data and methodology go:
Chemical & Related Manufacturing, PAC Contributions to Federal Candidates, 1999-2000

Credit: Information and figures provided by the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP)
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