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Unforgivable Blackness: A Film Directed by Ken Burns

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Ken Burns

Paul Barnes

David Schaye

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David Schaye: Co-Producer David Schaye has been working in film and television since 1989. After graduating from SUNY-Binghamton with a B.A. in film studies, he began working as a production assistant, researcher and associate producer for cable and network news specials and feature films.

From 1991 to 1994 he was an associate producer on Ken Burns's Emmy Award-winning 18-hour documentary series Baseball and served also as the picture researcher for the companion book. In 1995 he produced the critically acclaimed independent feature film Throwing Down, which screened at 10 international film festivals and won several awards, including the jury award for best independent feature at the Hamptons International Film Festival. Other producing credits include the theatrically released documentary feature Fastpitch: In Search of America, which follows the adventures of barnstorming fast-pitch softball teams competing for the world championship, and the documentary short 100th & Broadway.

Schaye has also been a contributing writer and consultant for several independent feature film scripts, and has written scripts for both live action and animated television shows, including multiple episodes of the award-winning Disney children's animated series PB&J.

Several years ago Schaye developed and wrote an original treatment for a film about the African-American boxer Jack Johnson, and proposed the idea to Ken Burns. Schaye is co-producer — along with Ken Burns and Paul Barnes — on Burns's most recent project, Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, a four-hour film scheduled to air on PBS in January 2005. Schaye says he is "thrilled and thankful," and still finds it "somewhat surreal that we have finally made this film."

David Schaye was born, raised, and still lives in New York City. He is currently developing a new documentary series about American inventors in the last half of the 19th century.