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My Journey Home Armando Pena Andrew Lam Faith Adiele
Your Journey HomeFor TeachersAbout the film
For Teachers
Lesson Plans

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My Journey Home: A Theme-Based Exploration
Children of immigrants or refugees who have come to the United States often live in two different worlds—that of their parents’ and the one in which they have been raised. Sometimes, they experience an internal struggle to create a personal cultural identity. Reconnecting with their origins—homeland, family—is an important way of establishing a comfortable place in American society. (Social Studies; grades 7-12)

The Homelands, The Rules, The Barriers
Understanding key historic events discussed in the film gives clarity to immigration and refugee issues in the United States. These periods in history also provide a reference point from which to assess present conditions in Nigeria, Mexico, and, Vietnam, and examine current U.S treatment of immigrants/refugees from these nations. (Social Studies; grades 7-12)

Political Events and Personal Lives
This lesson asks students to reflect on what ways political events have affected their own lives and to compare their lives in this regard to the subjects in the film. Students are then asked to interview someone who lived through many of the same events as the subjects of the film in order to make further comparisons about their impact on individuals. (U.S. History, Sociology; grades 9-12)

Cutural Awareness: A Writing Activity
The lesson begins with an exercise that asks students to look at a variety of quotations from literature that explore the meaning of home. Discussion questions then follow for each of the three segments of the film. After viewing the film three writing assignments follow: the writing of a poem about a journey captured in "fleeting images," a letter to one of the film's subjects, and a personal essay in which students reflect on where they feel and do not feel at home and why. (English, Language Arts, American Studies, Sociology/Anthropology; grades 9-12; can be adapted for middle school use)



  
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